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Found 2 results

  1. On Sunday, September 12, 1943, just after 5 PM, actor David G. G. Bacon was observed driving his wife's car erratically on Washington Boulevard in a rural part of Los Angeles. Finally he ran the car over the curb and into a bean field. He emerged from the car wearing only denim shorts, and bleeding from a single stab wound in his back. Witnesses attemped to render aid, but he died saying no more than "Please help me." Weeks before, on August 18, 1943, Bacon had wrapped a serial for Republic Pictures, The Masked Marvel. Bacon had played Bob Barton, the secret ID of the title character. (In fact except for the final scene where The Masked Marvel's identity was reveled, The Masked Marvel was played by uncredited stuntman Tom Steele.) The connectio to the film caused someone in the press to dub this "The Masked Marvel Murder." Autopsy by Dr. Frank R. Webb reveled a single stab wound 5 1/2 to 6 inches deep and 3/4 inch wide, possibly made by a Commando-style knife, that had pierced the left lung and struck the pericardium. Dr Webb offered the opinion that Bacon could not have lived more than 20 minutes with that wound. To this day the murder remains unsolved. That's the world we know as Real Life. But in the Golden Age Universe, where Mystery Man in masks and capes walked about, what if The Masked Marvel was the first Mystery Man to have died in the line of duty, albeit while in his civilian ID? Might the player characters be informed of the Masked Marvel's demise, and discretely investigate? Anyone ever run anything like this?
  2. Golden Age and Silver Age

    In order to help myself better understand how to give my games and other product the appropriate tone, I've begun to make a list of the differences between a typically Golden Age setting and a typically Silver Age one. Here are the lists I've made so far. Typically Golden Age: powers gained through magic, religious reincarnation, or (mainly) no powers except the virtues of manliness. An un-self-consciousness and mostly unwarranted ease and confidence in the face of adversity. Lurid, horrible, and ghastly ends for Bad Guys. Bad guys normally gangsters, spies, saboteurs, and mad scientists. Occasionally wizards or devils. Relatability is often achieved chiefly through the device of a Kid (or otherwise mundane) sidekick. Continuity loosely adhered to, if at all. Costumes designed to be easy to draw and print with the primitive four-color processes of the day. Typically Silver Age: powers derived from elaborately science-fiction-dressed sources like radiation, advanced chemistry, time travel, and aliens. More human-scale interpersonal relations and the problems of Real Life. Villains retained moral reprehensibility but developed powers and wore costumes. (For instance, The Melter wasn't a military saboteur, but rather an industrial one.) A different strain of adversaries, derived from Monster comics of the 50's, hang around to confound the wits of heroes both street-level and godlike. Stories became interconnected both within the title and between company's titles, and continuity becomes a strong hand guiding future development, for good and ill. Due both to better color separation and to avoid repetition, costumes become more garish and more intricate. What are some of your own ideas about the differences?
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