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My school bought hundreds of the glasses over the summer and handed them out to the students. Everyone went out to the football field over the extended lunch period and watched the eclipse.

 

It was really, really cool!

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Bah humbug. A bunch of people swarmed out into the parking lot, creating a road hazard and delaying my patrols. One of them was kind enough to lend me his protective glasses and it looked for all the world like a crescent moon with no stars in the sky. I did notice a distinct nauseous feeling when the eclipse was going on, but it cleared up when the whole thing was over. Not sure if it was physical, a psychological response to the eclipse or just a response to all the Lookie Loos interfering with my day. Come to think of it, might have been that breakfast sandwich I had earlier. :)

 

For me, it was not a big deal. I mean there is that it was some major astronomical event and all. But I didn't get superpowers and I did get nauseous. All in all, a trip to see a good movie would have been more exciting.

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I was hoping it'd be nice and dark this morning so I could sleep in. Usually, the sun's in the bedroom window that time of day. Wife woke me up to let me know the eclipse I intended to sleep through was happening. Thanks, dear.

 

During the 1970 eclipse, my dad let me look at it through his welding hood. It was just as Nolgroth describes. A dark blob with a sliver of slightly brighter stuff around it, tinted in super dark green. All in all, not too impressive. On a later eclipse (probably just an annular one), when I was in grade school, our class made pinhole projectors. Shadow with slightly brighter edges. Again, not super impressive.

 

I figure there must've been thousands of photographers with high end gear taking better pictures than those of it, and from a better position, so I'll check those out this time.

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Bah humbug. A bunch of people swarmed out into the parking lot, creating a road hazard and delaying my patrols. One of them was kind enough to lend me his protective glasses and it looked for all the world like a crescent moon with no stars in the sky. I did notice a distinct nauseous feeling when the eclipse was going on, but it cleared up when the whole thing was over. Not sure if it was physical, a psychological response to the eclipse or just a response to all the Lookie Loos interfering with my day. Come to think of it, might have been that breakfast sandwich I had earlier. :)

 

For me, it was not a big deal. I mean there is that it was some major astronomical event and all. But I didn't get superpowers and I did get nauseous. All in all, a trip to see a good movie would have been more exciting.

 

Well, I felt nauseous later, but that was because after last week's moving things around at work, and discovering a bunch of hidden mold, mildew, dust, and Lord knows what else, they decided to have cleaning day at work, with Lord know what chemicals.  So, for all I know, I merely suffered a mild chemical gas attack.

 

 

Note: Oh, and dead lizards, several dead lizards, poor bastards come in through the front and probably never find a way out.  I've caught my share and put them in a more favorable place in the woods out back, but I cant find them all in time.

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Just got home from the trip, but yes, we saw it.

 

We took it in in just about ideal circumstances in a little town called Midvale, Idaho. I cannot say enough good things about that town. 2:06 of totality. Great overall experience.

 

One huge scratch off the bucket list.

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I saw the eclipse from Western Washington using my homemade pinhole camera. Not spectacular; more exciting for knowing what was going on than for the view. But the day did briefly turn perceptibly darker. Some local birds got confused and started their dawn chorus again. Then I checked the driveway and it's true, the light shining through the nearby Douglas firs did act like hundreds of pinhole cameras, covering the driveway with eclipse crescents. Quite beautiful.

 

Two galling aspects:

 

1) I wasn't in the path of totality. I was for the 1979 total eclipse, but it was effin' February, and *heavily* overcast. (Though the clouds turned dark green, which was pretty cool.)

 

2) Watching the live news coverage of the eclipse as it crossed the country. Because the darn announcers *would not stop talking.* "Here we are in Oregon, there's only a sliver of sun left, totality comes in less than a minute! So let's turn away from the elipse itself and talk to this mayor about what his town did to prepare. Oh, it's totality! Instead of showing it, let's talk to these random people who are watching it. Because if we media people stop talking, we might cease to exist." Grr!

 

Dean Shomshak

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I didn't see totality in the Feb '79 eclipse: I had moved to Austin six months before to go to grad school. We got a bit of a partial there.

 

I was staying with friends whose feelings about TV are like mine: the set was used only by the kids, piping their Switch Zelda game to it so everyone could watch. Networks never got screen time.

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Still it was only the 2nd partial I really got a chance at.  The other being in elementary school, where 2 "geniuses" in the class kept trying to look at the sun without protection. (a dark part of me almost wished it would have "worked"

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I was in rural Colorado for the 79 eclipse, and I vaguely remember it. My mom was teaching Middle School at the time, and one of her students brought a welding mask from his farm to school that day. My mom let the kids take turns to go outside with the welding mask and look at it. I know this because she probably posted the fact on Facebook the other day.

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