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  1. 3 points
  2. 3 points
  3. 3 points
    I will bet there is a third edition rule I am using that I have never noticed changing. I play HERO, editions are irrelevant and ephemeral except to give everyone a base to start from. It is us to blame for paragraph long powers, we love to tinker and argue about the minutia - Steve simply tried to make it all clear. That took a LOT of words. Doesn't mean you have to use them. I don't have a favourite edition, I play HERO and I think arguing about details is pointless, especially as you can now download and play any edition you want.
  4. 3 points
    Pariah

    Campaign Prompts

    I started a campaign once where I asked the players to come up with some common origin for their characters. What they ultimately came up with was this: They were all VIPER agents that the organization considered troublesome and/or expendable and left to die in a major multi-Nest operation, only they all got super powers instead. The first adventure involved them deciding to rob a bank, only when they got there, another super villain group was already robbing it. So they beat down the other villains, and everybody assumed that they were heroes. So they decided to try being heroes. It was a fun dynamic.
  5. 3 points
    Cygnia

    Today's Dumb Criminal Story ...

    'Frosty had the last laugh': Vandal tries to run over giant snowman, hits tree stump instead
  6. 2 points
    How did you come up with your 'handle' (forum name)? Around 1995 I made a Shadow Knight in Everquest roughly themed after the god of disease (Bertoxxulus) so I shortened it to Toxxus. What was the first tabletop RPG you played? D&D when it still came in pastel colored cardboard boxes (Basic and Expert) What was the first tabletop RPG you GMed? D&D basic followed shortly by Boot Hill What are you currently playing/GMing? I'm playing Fantasy Hero using Pathfinder adventure paths for content. My Saturday group (mostly D&D 5e'ers) is enjoying the new system though I admit I'm enjoying it more as it comes with 30 years of nostalgia for me. When did you start to play Hero? Right around 1980 when I picked up a softcover edition that came in a cardboard box (they all did back then). Played Fantasy Hero extensively in high school and college.
  7. 2 points
    Well, I GM a lot and my first name is Joe. Plus, back in the early 70s, I loved playing with my GI Joes -- especially the one with Kung Fu grip and the one with the grappling hook! I GM'd before I played. The first tabletop RPG I played was AD&D 1e. But, really, we were playing RPGs without knowing it back when we would play with Micronaughts, Star Wars figures, etc. Before that, we were RPGing with Hot Wheels. My friends and I would build elaborate cities for them out back during summer, giving the cars' occupants personalities and acting out stories. In the winter, we'd use Lego to build the cities indoors. B/X D&D (the Moldvay/Cook Basic and Expert sets). I'm GMing a street-level supers campaign using HERO System 4e. I picked up Champions 2e at my FLGS in 1983, brought it home, read it, and it blew my mind. I began running it the next weekend. HERO has been my favorite game system ever since.
  8. 2 points
    Thanks for bumping this, GMGM-- I never knew this thread existed, or I might have made a more "formal" return to the boards (I tend to come and go as 'real life' demands increase or relax). So here we go: How did you come up with your 'handle' (forum name)? I almost wish I used my actual name, like so many others, just so I could reply with "My parents picked it out." I wasn't clever enough to invent a code or thematically-minded enough to do the clever thing and use a favorite character's name, though I really wished I had after seeing so many people doing it!). My name actually is Duke, like every third bird dog around these parts. The Bushido part comes from what I'd like to say is a really long story so let's skip it, but the fact is it's not a too-terribly long story, I'm just tired of telling it. Suffice it to say that owing to a vast number of opinions my friends have held of me, combined with the conversations held while we consoled a (then) recently-divorced and (possibly still) drunken comrade, I got tagged with then name "Bushido." It came and went, depending on how amusing it was for them to toss it out. A few years later, we're playing Boot Hill, fairly straight to the genre. As the campaign concludes, the GM pitches ideas for a new one, stating he'd like to do something a bit more cinematic, over-the-top-- something quirky, but still Western. I figured this was yet _another_ chance for me to pitch HERO at them (well, it was still Champions then), and they were curious enough to bite this time. So I introduced one group of three to our Champions group of four and pitched the idea to my then-GM (Jim), who loved it. My Boot Hill compatriots, though, needed convincing. How would changing systems make the game any different? "Well," I began, you can just go nuts: you can make _anything_ you want, so long as it's cool with Jim. You want a different old west? You could make a samurai gunman!" to which someone instantly quipped: "Yeah! And you could call him Duke Bushido!" And that was the end of that. "Bushido" had occasional comedic properties. But that one quip.... Well, "Duke Bushido" stuck, and it stuck real good.... So good, that the avatar on my posts was made by a friend some years later. I no longer have the original large image, but it's something of a merger of a stylized Japanese flag and a sunrise over a western clay desert, with a figure dressed in what appears to be jeans, a buckskin jacket, and a cowboy hat, holding a drawn katana. That's one of my bikes in the background (I still have that one, actually. I really like it). Now you know. Well, enough, anyway. What was the first tabletop RPG you played? Like so many other people, I started at some point in the mid-seventies. I can't tell you which was first, though. I can tell you it was either Traveller or D&D, as we did both pretty heavily. (The only way to know for certain would be to look up which came out first, but honestly, it doesn't matter to me enough to do it: who cares when a memory was made, so long as you get to keep it?). We did both back and forth. Not being a Tolkien guy and _really_ not liking the way D&D worked, I was always happiest with Traveller games. We tried other games as they caught our eyes and wallets, and fortunately, did not stick with D&D too long after some real variety started to pop up. What was the first tabletop RPG you GMed? Metamorphosis Alpha. I had to actually _buy_ it, but I was willing to do _anything_ to give D&D a smaller slot in our rotation. Terrible game, by the way; I don't get the nostalgia associated with it. Sure, it was pretty much D&D, mechanics-wise, but at least there wasn't any Tolkien in it. Tried Gamma World when it came out, but it was straight-up Dungeons and Mutants; couldn't even pretend otherwise. Stumbled across Daredevils and had a great time running that. Bought a boxed set of Champions 2e (my GM picked up 1e when it hit the shelves, but the game store never got another one), which my GM devoured and we promptly upgraded. When he was ready to split GM responsibilities, I became a Champions GM, but even then, I didn't consider myself one: I was just helping Jim, ya know? I _loved_ the system Champions was using, and it wasn't too long before we were using it for Daredevils and made a stab at Traveller. I didn't _dislike_ supers as a genre; I just didn't have a lot of appreciation for it. I mean, it's easy to be a brave hero when you're bullet-proof, right? And there were no comic books in my childhood, nor televised cartoons (you'd need to have had a TV, which would have been useless without electricity). Besides, Sci-Fi was my addiction at that time, and we were all familiar with Traveller, even though we hadn't played it in a couple of years at that point.' The Traveller HERO failure wasn't the system; by that point, it was just the wrong setting / theme for our group of players (which by then had swollen to nine players, hence Jim needing some relief). Best of all, though, it proved our theory that Champions was universal! Found a boxed set of Justice Inc, noticed the HERO Games tag, and immediately thought "They know it, too!" From that point on, any game I like enough to start an actual campaign in found it's guts replaced with the Champions drive train. And while it's not relevant, I'd like to add, specifically to you Super Hero fans, that I have, in the last few years, developed an appreciation for the genre. You can blame my kids for that. They got into super heroes, and I'm into spending time with them. Supers make more sense, looking at them through the kid's eyes. What are you currently playing/GMing? Everything is on HERO guts, regardless of genre. Mostly it's 2e, modified with a few things from 4e, and a ruling or two-- a couple of Power Modifiers, anyway-- from 5e. I am currently running a Supers game for some kids that I've been referring to as "my youth group." I also run space opera weekly-- or, _mostly_ weekly, on the far end of ninety miles from here. Once a month, I play in an occult-themed thriller, but that's about to wind down, freeing me up a bit of time. And that's it. That's the overly-informative basics.
  9. 2 points
    Heavy use of Mook rules would help. Having to keeping track of Recoveries would generally be a Bad Thing, although a very simplified Recovery rule might be OK. Essentially, the trick would be to find a way of reaching the same results as the full rules most of the time, with a fraction of the effort. Say, the same result 80% of the time with 20% of the rules. That said, "skirmish games" cover a lot of ground. They can involve half a dozen characters/units per side, or a hundred. You could virtually use the full rules for the smaller games. It's the bigger ones where you really need to cut things down.
  10. 1 point
    I love the setting and was curious if there's anyone else on these boards who do too? Steve did and amazing job with the book and I think it deserves more supplements. Although the base book is very detailed in terms of races, geography, theology, etc, I think there's tons of room to expand on. The setting has such good bones that it feels criminal to not expand on it. Also, an update to 6th edition would be fantastic although strictly not necessary.
  11. 1 point
    It should still be in the store. It’s only a soft copy iirc.
  12. 1 point
    Sure, megavillains are single villains powerful enough to take on an entire team. That is a tried and true comic book superhero trope. But not every encounter was with such a villain. Hell, not every issue was with such a villain. The idea that each encounter should lead to a Boss Fight is a video game trope. In fact, 90s cartoons might have been influenced by arcade fighters in much the same way that TTRPGs have been influenced by MMORPGs.
  13. 1 point
    death tribble

    A Thread for Random Videos

    Katelyn Ohashi's perfect routine. This went viral and you can see why.
  14. 1 point
    I have always had a problem with the "Boss Monster" concept anyway. The "Boss Monster", is not "The Big bad", but the "Boss Monster is a left over concept from early video games. For HERO, it's for me always been the climactic battles have been about composition and numbers of opposing teams, rather than one big, laughing, roaring punching bag at the end of an adventure. In 5e, and Pathfinder is this concept of "Legendary actions" which give them an extra slot on the Initiative list, which being the victim of it, feels like the GM is cheating. Not a fan. I really don't see the attraction of this as a GM, and even less as a player.
  15. 1 point
    wcw43921

    Supers Image game

    I've got something--see what you can make of these--
  16. 1 point
    What this always indicated is that either CON was underpriced, or the figured characteristics it provided were overpriced (or both in some combination). +10 CON for 20 points gathered +2 REC (4 points), +5 STUN (5 points), +20 END (10 points) and +2 ED (2 points), so 21 points worth of stats before considering resistance to being Stunned and the rare CON roll. +10 STR for 20 points gathered +2 REC (4 points), +5 STUN (5 points), and +2PED (2 points), so 11 points worth of stats before considering everything else a high STR provides. I recall in the 6e (maybe the SETAC) discussions, the possibility of repricing and keeping Figured Characteristics was discussed. This would have likely lowered the cost of STUN, REC and END (PD and ED being tied to other defense powers could not reasonably change), rejigged the fomuli so that a 10 STR,, CON, BOD character still had the same starting figureds, repricing the " no figured" limitation to match a 100% sellback, etc. The question then became why keep Figured at all - just reprice the stats as "no figured" and reprice the figureds to appropriately match. The bigger change, to me, was pricing OCV and DCV. That highlighted just how underpriced DEX was (or how overpriced combat skill levels were) for what it provided. I think there are still some pricing imbalances. The stats not fixed are INT and PRE, maybe EGO and perhaps DEX to a lesser extent. I think the "sum of the parts" cost should be comparable to the whole. In my view, DEX, INT and PRE could be modeled very similarly, each providing +1 to a wide range of rolls/skills (which should cost 5 points for +1 to all such rolls, scaling down for more limited rolls) and something else - initiative, PRE attacks, Perception - which would make up another 5 points for +5 to the stat (limit for more restrictive application), so 2 points per +1 to the stat. EGO should be similar, but stay 1 point (half for Ego rolls, half for PRE defense, removed from PRE). Prior to 6e, I had to increase DEX to increase OCV and DCV. How often did we hear about the need for even Bricks to be as agile as Olympic gymnasts, all of whom must also be very potent combatants? When the price points are such that it is cheaper to buy CON (or STR) than to buy the Figured without the other benefits, the pricing is not balanced. When a low-DEX concept cannot be competitive in the game because high DEX is the only efficient means of getting CV, there is something wrong. The game needs to encourage building in concept. Making some concepts (normal human agility person highly skilled at combat, say) inefficient choices discourages building in concept, or just discourages certain concepts from being built. Neither is a good result, in my view. I find some comments (not necessarily yours) that seem to move "build in concept" to the extreme of "character classes" [Brick Class gets to buy this; Martial Artist class gets something else; Speedsters get different abilities; Energy Projectors get still others; Mentalist gets something else]. I'd agree it was the biggest, and most visible and obvious, change. Decoupling has been going on for a long time and 6e was no exception (removal of things like Growth Momentum, and Stretch Momentum damage, for example). With 20/20 hindsight, what 6e really needed was a sidebar setting out revised prices for STR, DEX, CON, BOD, EGO that added Figured Characteristics back in, together with each stat's "no figured" limitation. That's what happened to a lot of other rule changes (e.g. the doubling rule for HKAs). [ASIDE: +30 DEX would then give +6 to all DEX rolls (say 30 points), +30 Initiative (30 points), +3 SPD (30 points), +10 OCV (50 points) and +10 DCV (50 points), so 190 points. Pricing DEX at 6 points would provide a small "package deal" bonus, and No Figured becomes a -2 1/4 limitation. That highlights what a bargain DEX was pre-6e, or possibly that CVs were overpriced (but the latter would require a lot more work on Combat Skill Level pricing).
  17. 1 point
    Cygnia

    "Neat" Pictures

  18. 1 point
    Not a massive fan of Obama, but thought this was funny.
  19. 1 point
    I don't know whether this poll is already past due... but I avoided voting because Canada is apparently a point of contention here (which doesn't get said that often). I finally had to put in a vote for the city where my late mother was born and grew up -- Lima, Peru. So of course, the young heroes Lima's team would end up inspiring would be in neighboring Argentina. (BTW if you read my Valley of Night sourcebooklet, you'll have seen that I have an original Peru-based NPC hero ready to join up.)
  20. 1 point
    I've tried to do it for High Fantasy, and Sci-Fi settings. The truth is, you don't want a kitchen sink game. In case you don't want to read the rest of my explanation, you'll want to look up the rules for "Hordes of the Things." It's a tabletop war game that separates units into archetypes and those archetypes have costs. They're big claim is that you can play HOTT with any models and it works. I have a friend that works in design and she said to me when designing a game, start from the bottom and build up. If you include every rule under the sun that you love and the game is unplayable, it becomes difficult to decide which rule to exclude. But if you start with a basic idea, and it's playable, you can add rules you enjoy until the game is too cumbersome. Then simply remove the last rule you added and you have a playable game with some mechanics you enjoy. HERO System works as an RPG because I only have to keep track of one character's BODY, STUN, END, ammunition... Even as a GM I tend to fudge these things with minion NPCs because it's simply a ton of bookkeeping. If you're interested in a more complex Mordheim, Kill Team, X-Wing, Infinity, Malifaux, etc., go ahead. You'll be keeping a binder of 8-12 character sheets with tactical level statistics and skills. You can even develop an economics system to recruit new members and give existing ones experience points. I'm simply going to tell you in my experience trying to do this, you will be pitching a lot of the bloat rules in favor of what it is you are trying to do - put minis on the table, and kill them.
  21. 1 point
    Put me down for India. The place is mad busy. Seriously, the traffic in Mumbai and Delhi scared the crap outta me. But if you can fly then that's not a bother. And the food is fantastic. Yes, one would have to be very careful how one behaved in India as a foreign public figure. But by and large Indian folks are pretty cosmopolitan. Melbourne would be my second choice. I go there a couple of times a year and I think it's a great place. Fantastic cafe scene. I would love to see the reactions of foreign heroes who find themselves there during the AFL finals season. As for where to inspire a team, Egypt. Because I keep meaning to get there. And I will one day.
  22. 1 point
    You may be the smartest person in the room, but it is not smart to count on being the smartest person in the room.
  23. 1 point
    Yes, be up front with things. In Bob Simpson's champions campaign we learneed that sometimes we would rup up against foes to powerful to take down, and we learned that once we figured that out, we should probably leave, lest one of us gets captured. Getting captured by certain foes was really bad. So, we would rather flee a fight in good order, than get captured, and then figure out a way to use what we learned the next time we ran across them. Bob was up front about it. so we took him seriously.
  24. 1 point
    Yes it is. No it isn't. Wouldn't have mattered, I'm afraid. : rofl: I'm going to have to find a couple more your posts and stick laughing man on them, too. That was too funny for just one guffaw. Duke
  25. 1 point
    "Chaos Squared" My artist quit one hour after I drafted Dupli-Kate and Multi-Paul. I don't blame him. The crowd scenes are going to be bonkers. I wouldn't want to draw them. More importantly, the Dee Dees are going to need some muscle if they're going to be and kind of threat to these assembled heroes. So, for my first non-sibling pairing, some wonderfully apropos villains to enhance the chaos. (Fenris is a threat, but they are more on the Lawful Evil side of things than Chaotic Evil, that's why they get the second story arc.) So, to back up the Deeds, masters of psychological warfare, two of Arkham's maddest, and one of slash fiction's favorite couples, The Scarecrow and The Mad Hatter!
  26. 1 point
    sentry0

    Campaign Prompts

    I once co-ran a game where everyone had a common origin much like the Fantastic Four (accident gave them powers). It was a lot of fun but everyone bought into the idea from the start...I think it's the only way to get a common origin story going. Also, we had a player join us later in the campaign and he was kind of the odd man out unfortunately...he broke the vibe of the story through no fault of his own.
  27. 1 point
    Pariah

    Noah's Ark: The January 2019 Superdraft

    Next pair of heroes: Fire and Ice
  28. 1 point
    The 5th Edition is the ultimate evolution of the greatest RPG Character Creation System.
  29. 1 point
    Doc Democracy

    Campaign Prompts

    Useful, I tend to make this a problem for the players rather than me. I ask that each character has a reason why they would want to team up/ help at least two other members of the group and I do not allow a closed loop of three players. This would help them think about ties that would work for two or more characters in the team.
  30. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Improving Intimidation

    One thing I cannot stress enough is to consider the character's reputation. If a character has a well-known reputation for "unpleasant behavior," and the person he is trying to intimidate is aware of that reputation... well, that's a plus. What's the current situation? If the character being intimidated is at a clear disadvantage, even if it's just in this moment--- for example, even a military general, when caught alone and dragged into an alley, is just a well-disciplined old man being held captive and threatened by someone else-- well that's a plus, too. What's the character's motivation to intimidate the target? If there is some established bad blood there, well that's a plus. So what's that thing I can't stress enough? The thing for which there is no hard math, no power to buy, no points to spend: the actual situation, and the role (with an "e" ) playing aspect of the game. Hope something there helps! Duke
  31. 1 point
    Lucius

    Improving Intimidation

    That would work if Lord Qulex were using 6th edition, but I"m pretty sure he's using 5th. However, I want to point out that one way to enhance a PRE attack is to use a PRE based Skill, like Oratory; Or possibly inventing a new PRE based Skill called Intimidation. Making the roll for the Skill adds 1d6 and making it by half adds 2d6 to PRE attacks. Lucius Alexander Animal Handler: Palindromedaries
  32. 1 point
    Christopher

    Improving Intimidation

    So this was moved from Rules Questions to Hero System, so I guess participation is wanted. One cheaper way to buff PRE attacks would be "Striking Appereance". While originally defined as "Pretty" or "Ugly", I simply view it as limited presence. So it could be used for "Intimidating Presence" just as well.
  33. 1 point
    The most AP intensive Melee weapon for Fanatasy settings I could find was the Great Axe, at 54 AP. So PD/ED should be 11 (54/5 = 11) There is no body defined, but Object Creation demands body to be bought within Defenses/2. With the lack of granularity, 8 is the target. So here is my math on Object creation, 1 Minute Time Limit: Object Creation: 20 Complexity: Most melee and Ranged Weapons are covered by the baseline. However Crossbows might require the +10 "Complex Object" Modifier Buy Defenses from 2 to 11: 9x3 = +27 Buy Body from 2 to 8 to match Defenses: +6 Every Doubling (from 1 object): +5; However I doubt we need doublings nessesarily. You can just spend several half-phases creating weapons For the Duration, Object Creation has a custom Limitation "Limited Lifespan". It happens to end at -2, same value as time 1 Minute Time Limit Additional Limitation "Limited Objects" Might be applicable. But even just having the Option to Create Weapons with this power might negate that. Object Creation: Base Cost: 53 Base Advantages: None Limitations: 1 Minute Duration or Limited Lifespan (1 Minute) (-2) Real Cost: 18 Character Points
  34. 1 point
    The big difference here is that the GM has the ability to rein in any use of wealth by quoting the availability of materials, weaponsmiths or just permission to make such things and equip them to malcontents. 🙂 A magical ability has no such limitations and should therefore be more costly. Doc
  35. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Flying Dodge to enter Combat

    Let's be completely honest: By strictest definition, "martial arts" is the "art" of combat or art of regimented military tactics. Taken more loosely, a martial artist is someone who has spent a great deal of time learning and practicing the techniques associated with a particular fighting method-- usually, but not always, a form of hand-to-hand combat. So really, it's open for anything from a skilled boxer to some sort of alienese sword fighting to what we typically think of: asian fisticuffs. Or Footsticuffs. Of whatever. In HERO terms, it's "here's some combos you can use in HTH combat. Some are sketchier than others."
  36. 1 point
    tkdguy

    A Thread for Random Videos

  37. 1 point
    Deadman

    Flying Dodge to enter Combat

    I don't think that Martial Arts is really unbalancing at all. It is available to everyone so that right there means it is pretty balanced. Consider the Multipower below which could be used instead of Martial Arts to pretty awesome effect. 16 Martial Arts: Multipower, 20-point reserve, (20 Active Points); all slots Only To Augment HTH Standard Maneuvers (-1/4) 3V Accurate: +4 OCV (20 Active Points); Only To Augment HTH Standard Maneuvers (-1/4) 3V Evasive: +4 DCV (20 Active Points); Only To Augment HTH Standard Maneuvers (-1/4) 3V Strong: +20 STR (20 Active Points); Only To Augment HTH Standard Maneuvers (-1/4) 3V Powerful: Hand-To-Hand Attack +4d6 (20 Active Points); Hand-To-Hand Attack (-1/4), Only To Augment HTH Standard Maneuvers (-1/4) 3V Lethal: Killing Attack - Hand-To-Hand 1d6+1 (2d6 w/STR) (20 Active Points); Only To Augment HTH Standard Maneuvers (-1/4) In this example the character could use any one of the slots to bolster his HTH prowess or mix and match them (because they are Variable slots) to great effect. Martial Strike - +2d6, +2 DCV when performing Strike Fast Strike - +2 OCV, +2d6 when performing Strike Martial Block - +2 OCV, +2 DCV when performing Block Martial Dodge - +4 DCV (Total of +7!) when performing Dodge Martial Grab - +1 OCV, +1 DCV, +10 STR when performing Grab Offensive Strike - +4d6 when performing Strike Killing Strike - 2d6KA when performing Strike If you want to make it even more powerful you could drop the limitation and voila! You have the ability to do a Flying Dodge. Sure, it costs more than your average Martial Arts package but it doesn't have the Negatives on any of the maneuvers either. Just my $.02, Deadman
  38. 1 point
    Spence

    Champions for High School D&D Players

    It can also backfire badly. A PC built on standard superhero points will not be the 50 gazzilian point superhero in the comic. Not that anything you said is incorrect. But I have had it backfire more than succeed. My most successful process is this: 1) Run a mini-arc with all the players using pre-gen heroes. This gives them a taste of how the game actually works. 2) Ask them what type of character they really want to play. Maybe based on a favorite hero, maybe a unique one. Have them jot down some notes and then I say. "Great! But we are not going to make this one today. Instead we'll hold these notes and make a different PC and play a short two scenario game, this way you can see the difference between what you thought you built and what you really built and how it works in game". Then we play. 3) Then after they have an idea of how to build a PC. They can actually build the PC concept they actually wanted. Sure it is a few steps, but you avoid the frustration of unmanaged expectations or disappointment at the start. It also avoids "ruining" a character concept.
  39. 1 point
    Cancer

    Champions for High School D&D Players

    I suppose that advice like this is too much, too soon for high school newbs.
  40. 1 point
    When I attended the University of Washington (and starting my first Champions campaign), I was delighted to learn the UW had its own small nuclear reactor. How convenient for radiation accidents and faculty members who become mad scientists! Dean Shomshak
  41. 1 point
    But, would that not be the same thing as comitting suicide? I mean she knows she is in some of those!
  42. 1 point
    I voted Honolulu, and no it wasn't for the weather or scenery -- I don't like heat and have pollen allergies. 🤧 But it strikes me that this would be a good location for different types of supers adventures than found in the typical American city. Hawaii is a financial and social bridge between North America, Oceania, and the Far East, so it carries much potential for international action. Tourism can bring people to the islands from almost anywhere. The extensive military facilities beg for cooperation/friction with government agencies. The vast Pacific Ocean provides opportunities for exploring lost civilizations on hidden islands or beneath the waves; fighting prehistoric survivors or giant monsters from the deep; rescuing folks from hurricanes, volcanoes, tsunamis, shipwrecks, and other disasters; or dealing with denizens of a supernatural folklore distinct from any in North America.
  43. 1 point
    zslane

    Superhero vs Fantasy

    Yep, totally. But then, I feel that managing the balance and fairness of the campaign, whether we're talking about combat encounters or PC builds, is part of the job of the GM in any game. The fact that it requires more care and attention in Champions doesn't give the GM an excuse to be lazy on this front; rather that the game should only be run by someone willing to put in the necessary effort.
  44. 1 point
    Brian Stanfield

    Superhero vs Fantasy

    It occurs to me that in the '80s most of the Champions players had no problem coming up with their own settings and creating their own adventures. My experience was that it was all set in one's local city, and spread out from there. The villains books offered new bad guys that could be plugged into anyone's already established city. Most of the people I encountered had no problems coming up with their own stuff. The points ensured that everything was balanced (one of the main reasons I picked up HERO in the first place). The problem with home-brewed stuff in D&D back in the day was that game balance was nearly impossible to establish. One couldn't create new monsters, spells, classes, or, well, anything without creating some game balance problems. So we all depended on the books to come out and establish the new rules, etc. TSR was like a pusher before the OGL was available, making sure that we depended on them to meet the demand for new rules, books, and adventures. Modules were a moment of brilliance, especially when they were linked in series of modules that led to a larger campaign arc. I think that was both a product of the "golden age" of RPGs, and also a product of a culture that still depended on books for their primary source of information.
  45. 1 point
    Spence

    Superhero vs Fantasy

    A lot of great posts and a lot of good points. But I think there is another thing that is being overlooked. Availability. With the exception of the long running closed game, usually played at someone’s house. Many gamers, maybe even a majority, have very little to no time for campaign/adventure creation. On the fantasy side for current RPG’s - D&D, Pathfinder, C&C, S&W, FFG Star Wars (yes, fantasy not scifi), SW, etc. – you have three overall types of pre-built adventures. 1. Large well-designed and self-contained campaigns built as a series (5-15) of connected scenarios. Examples are D&D’s Curse of Strahd and Rage of Demons, Pathfinders Rise of the Runelords and Ironfang Invasion and FFG SW has The Jewel of Yavin and Mask of the Pirate Queen. 2. Professional quality adventures with 1-3 scenarios designed to be played in one, maybe two sessions, and able to be plugged into any campaign. 3. A multitude of third-party adventures and campaigns of wildly varying quality published through one of several versions of the open game license. Any PC that is made using the core rules can be played and no specialized background information or knowledge is required by the players or GM. On the superhero side. 1. A few intricate and obsessively detailed large-scale campaigns. M&M 3rd has Emerald City Knights set in Emerald City. 2. The professional quality adventure for one or two sessions is represented. 3. With the bulk being third party. The big take away is that for each single offering on the Supers side, there are dozens if not hundreds for the fantasy side. Many are easily interchangeable (D&D, d20, PF etc.). Why is this important? In order to really design characters and adventures you have to understand a game in play. Right now, the big three RPG’s (in my area) are D&D 5th, Pathfinder and FFG Star Wars and they all have similar operating methods. They each have a starter box with a simple adventure, streamlined rules and pre-generated PC’s. Yes, pre-gen characters and not a single word on char-gen. There are even pre-gens at multiple levels to simulate character advancement. They also have embedded guidance for the new to roleplaying GM to shepherd them through their first adventure. Why? They realize that in order to get new players, you need to introduce them to roleplaying in general and give them some conceptual framework to understand what they are doing when the begin to build their own adventures and characters. They also have all three types of ready-made adventures plus a version of OGL so that the less profitable versions are designed and sold by the fan base. D&D is charging ahead with a series of well written adventure books while leaving smaller and one-shot adventures to their DM’s Guild. You can write and sell your own adventures as long as you do it via the DM’s Guild and abide by their guidelines and formats. No licensing negotiations and contracts, just read the agreement, use the format and sell it here. Now they have many traditional licenses out there, but the point is that there is a plethora of adventures there for the taking. New players and DM’s don’t have to stumble around trying to figure out how to make a balanced adventure that is fun. And D&D is not alone on this charge. There are several supers games out there that are beginning to follow a similar plan. But most have limited themselves to maybe one larger adventure/campaign and then all small one-shots. They are also encouraging third party OGL style contributions. You can look outside of traditional fantasy or supers and see that horror and other genres are also doing it. In fact, if their line is currently successful and moving product, they are putting out one or two major adventures a year and filling the gaps with third party & OGL style product. Right now D&D has hit the sweet spot. Their large adventures are designed to support not just the players that want to take it home, but they are designed for easy running in organized play. A GM can literally spend 20 minutes reading through the days adventure and run it. Every league night sees my FLGS selling out of Players Handbooks. Every league night. Also, they continually sell the old Adventure books, not just Sword Coast or the DM oriented monster manuals and treasure books. Yes, availability by way of ready to run adventures is one way the fantasy genre games are kicking the super genre’s behinds. And yes, I know, everyone preaches how no one, I mean no one runs any pre-made adventures. And yet those “no one’s” seem to be buying a lot of them not to mention running them every week. And also, yes, the genres are different. But not as different as one would think. The bigger fantasy adventures are generally designed so they are self-contained. The heroes travel to a location, resolve X number of scenarios, stop the threat, return to base. Or the adventure is designed to happen in the PC’s home city and is easily “plugged in”. The smaller adventures are also designed to “plug in” and generally avoid the need for pre-history or knowledge by the PC’s. Some of the newer supers games are pushing forward and making gains, Supers!, Bash! and ICONS are some. M&M 3rd Edition has some great stuff and there is a lot of good third party and OGL type material out there. If I could grok the condition system they use instead of damage and effect I’d be running it. Seems simple when read, but I just can’t seem to run it. Just isn’t fun for me. In the end RPG’s have three distinct and separate components. 1. Playing the game 2. Building characters 3. Building adventures Until players have some kind of understanding of how to play (#1), trying to do 2 or 3 is difficult or not worth their efforts. However, once they PLAY a game or two, and decide it was fun, they almost always want to make their own character. Making characters always leads to buying a rulebook. Play as a PC for a while and they are going to want to try their hand running a game. WotC and Paizo know this and have tailored beginner sets to set the hook and a continuing line of adventures for the modern gamer with little time to build. To wrap up. Super’s RPG’s are behind compared to Fantasy, Scifi and well, to be frank, the field. To catch up or expand the market share they need to sell more rulebooks. This is where you say “no duh”. Get people to play, intro’s, pre-gen PC’s and plenty of adventures to learn from. Then get them to build characters. If they want to make a character, they will get rule book. Then get them to build adventures. They will buy GM aid books. Make sure the product is modern, i.e. color and decent art. Something that pops on the shelf and then sucks them in with layout and interior art. In that battle, Fantasy has been in the vanguard with Scifi close behind with Horror in support. Of course all this is my opinion and if the past is any indicator, not a popular one.
  46. 1 point
    zslane

    Superhero vs Fantasy

    Maybe so! Then again, Iron Man is totally metal, and Frodo is fairly square.
  47. 1 point
    Killer Shrike

    Superhero vs Fantasy

    D&D as the first rpg set the trend, and had first mover advantage plus hit on the zeitgeist of its times. In the 60's, early 70's Tolkein's books entered the public domain in the US on accident due to a bizarre clause in the US copyright laws regarding import of books from other countries. Ace published a bunch of royalty free copies at a reduced cost compared to other books of the time. The themes of the books in regards to "back to nature" / anti-technology and an overall anti-war sentiment meshed well with the counterculture movement of the day (what we think of as hippies these days), and the idea that the "pipeweed" hobbits made and smoked was marijuana found favor with the same group as well (Tolkein himself stated it was just a kind of tobacco). Consequently, Tolkein-isms and similar derivatives became a cultural phenomenon of the era, and you end up with wizards painted on the sides of panel vans and rock ballads such as The Battle of Evermore and so on. It resonated with a lot of people who did not conform to the mainstream norms of their day, particularly creatives. In the downstream ripple of that, we get D&D and other vaguely Tolkein-esque content including some early video games made mostly at colleges by young techies who were hip to the youth culture of their day. Superheroes on the other hand had their original heyday in the 1940's and then again later in the 80's. For a very long time, they were seen as being strictly for kids. This began to change in the 80's and 90's, and of course the last decade has been insanely big for superheroes. Unfortunately, most people only know DC and Marvel characters from the movies and TV shows, and for whatever reason both Marvel and DC have never really been able to get their act together when it comes to RPG's and videogames. There's been a lot of good rpgs published. I myself enjoyed Marvel FASERIP from TSR in the 80's, Marvel SAGA (the card one, which was actually pretty fun if you gave it a chance), and Marvel Cortex+ (which was a GREAT game). But either they don't catch on, or they are not supported and die off, or the license lapses. I think that perhaps part of the problem with getting more people hooked on superhero rpgs is that fantasy stories are mostly literary; you read them and imagine them in your minds eye. They attract readers who are good at imagining things in their minds eye. This is the very same skill one needs to get into and enjoy roleplaying games. Superhero stories are mostly comic books / graphic novels or now movies and tv shows; you experience these stories mostly by looking at pictures or cinematic representations. You don't have to imagine anything in your mind's eye...what is happening has been drawn or acted out for you to look at. It is a visual medium, and it draws people who appreciate a visual medium and want to be SHOWN what it is vs imagine it for themselves. There is some overlap; some people enjoy both traditional textbased books and graphical books, but a lot of comic book fans are not big readers in the general sense.
  48. 1 point
    I don’t really grok the question. I have played Champions since it was a poorly typeset black and white rulebook. Each Edition has a different kind of feel and they are on a continuum. There is a lot of love for 4th edition, and I think that is probably because it was created with an emphasis on the genre rather than the rules, 5th and 6th focussed on the mechanics over the genre and the rulebooks reflect that. i think what we have is a rulebook preference. I think, rulebooks aside, I prefer having 6th edition. I note most of those who prefer earlier editions port in the things that they like from later editions. I also think that while many call later editions bloated, these very forums demonstrate a desire for more detail on how things work - that indicates that the drift to textbook like rulebooks was a response to what the fan base seemed to want. I appreciate all of the detail when I am getting into debates here on the forums, it explains the detail of how the power is intended to work. as such, I do not have a favourite edition. I prefer more information over less, I like having all the editions as they provide me with alternative ways to do things. Personally, I am looking forward to a new 7th edition which utilise modern technology, a true e-book that focuses on utility. It should deliver the core system with virtually no detail upfront. I would bet you could make the system look really streamlined that way with lots of colour and art. The detail would be readily available on virtual pages that explained the detail necessary when building characters or thrashing through a rule query in game. It would also provide a ready GM reference for in-game reference. I write in for 7th Edition (interactive). 🙂 Doc
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    Old Man

    John Wick / Keanu Reeves for 6e

    More Keanu 3 gun. There are multiple reasons to view this vid.
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