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  1. 3 points
    Not only is it not their job, it'd be incredibly irresponsible of them to do so. Any concessions would merely empower the GOP to take the government hostage over and over and over again. On top of that, Trump is impossible to negotiate with because he's unable to negotiate in good faith. He changes positions more often than he changes his underwear. Just look at the negotiations leading up to this shutdown, where he proudly proclaimed he'd take ownership of it and then turned around and blamed the Democrats for it a couple of days later. I can't think of a more clear cut situation where negotiations should not even be attempted.
  2. 3 points
    Did someone say artist?
  3. 2 points
    Border security was offered. Trump said no. If Trump and McConnell were gone, the government would reopen as soon as the the new senate majority leader passed the vote, and the new president signed the paperwork. One of the CRs sent back was held by the GOP before Congress was seated. Basically the Democratic Congress voted on a bill that the GOP came up with and McConnell is like I am going to let this expire so Trump won't veto it. You can't get a better compromise than that. CES
  4. 2 points
    You say that like it is a strange occurrence... 🙂 Are not all gamer groups like that??
  5. 2 points
    sentry0

    what would you call this skill?

    Probably a PS: Detective roll or something like it
  6. 2 points
    The wisdom of Solomon Grundy.
  7. 2 points
    Pariah

    "Neat" Pictures

  8. 2 points
    Their complaint is more along the lines of; we don't play often enough (every two weeks). To which I reply, anyone who wants to step up to the plate is welcome to!
  9. 2 points
    Self-Inflicted Damage: This is a rule I adapted from the original (pre-4th Ed.) HERO sourcebook, The Golden Age of Champions. As it stands now the HERO rules make no provision for someone striking a hard, unyielding object with a part of their bodies and injuring themselves, like punching a stone wall, which would often occur in real life. Strictly by the rules as currently written, a human being could eventually beat a car into scrap with his bare hand. This rule is intended to create a more realistic situation for people who prefer that in their games. Whenever a character strikes a "soft" target without Resistant Defense, like normal human flesh, he never takes damage from the attack himself. When a character strikes an object with Resistant Defense (which most inanimate objects have, and even some characters such as those wearing armor), he may suffer STUN and BODY damage up to the maximum rolled for the attack. The character's own applicable Defenses would reduce this damage. If using the optional Hit Location rules, the damage can be modified by the multipliers for the Hit Location of the body part you used to strike with. If the Body damage the character rolls is higher than the Resistant Defense of the object, and enough to destroy all of its remaining BODY after subtracting its DEF, or do Knockdown or Knockback to the target, the character suffers no damage from the attack himself. If the character rolls more BODY Damage than the Resistant DEF of the target, but not enough to destroy all its remaining BODY, and does no Knockdown or Knockback, he takes half the damage from the attack, reduced by his total applicable DEF. If the character doesn't roll more BODY Damage than the Resistant Defense, and does no Knockdown or Knockback, he suffers the full damage himself, minus his total applicable Defense. This is a useful rule to explain how trained martial artists can break boards, concrete blocks etc. without breaking their hands, feet etc. It can also work as a weapon-breaker, with the damage being inflicted to the weapon a character strikes with, or a weapon used to block an incoming blow, instead of his own body. It works for any object with Resistant Defenses, without the need to stat out a Damage Shield for every wall. It could also apply to that classic scenario of a normal person striking a superhuman with "skin of steel" and injuring his hand. As an optional rule for "normals" as opposed to supers, it helps distinguish the two in a superheroic campaign.
  10. 2 points
    Thank you. Maybe I should be in the business of writing back cover blurbs. Given that, 1) the relatively small number who will see a phrase like "The Desolation of Skarm" and automatically think of Tolkein's line "They were come to the Desolation of the Dragon, and they were come at the waning of the year," and given that 2) of those who DO think of it, most will respond approvingly and only a vanishingly small portion (perhaps a single individual) will sneer and say "really?", I will venture to suggest that yes, even if it we regard it as a crib, it's still a good idea. Lucius Alexander The palindromedary looms up to say that overuse of the word "looming" is not necessarily such a good idea. Everyone's a critic.
  11. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Duke's scans

    Okay, folks-- for the two or three of you who were watching, I have started a new thread, primarily as a courtesy to those folks who kept seeing the "Fantasy HERO" section show new posts, only to be disappointed that it was yet another update on the scanning of Western HERO-- which, if you are one of the two or three who actually cared, is going quite well. All pages are scanned, and about sixty of them have been fully corrected. It won't be too long before I will be able to send Jason a decent PDF of the original book, for legal dispersal as he sees fit. Hopefully, it will be offered as inexpensively as the other 4e books. When that's done, I intend (doesn't mean it will happen soon, but it will happen eventually) to give Horror HERO the same treatment, as I have a donor copy of that as well. "Why Western first?" you might ask if you didn't grow up watching cowboy movies in the second-run theater, or throwing yourself into your chores with wild abandon with the desperate hope that you might get done in time to watch Gunsmoke after supper? Or maybe you didn't think Chuck Conners was all that cool making machine-gun fast deadly-accurate hip shots with with custom-cut Winchester repeater? Well because wether you're a western fan or not, you're a HERO gamer, and Western HERO is not just a part of HERO's history, it's an extremely important part of HERO's history. We all know that in third edition, there were actually a number of different games all using what was essentially Champions, rubbed smooth here, chiseled a bit there, re-named or re-worked a tiny bit to give each Power, each Skill-- each Advantage and Limitation that we know today as "HERO System" a bit of genre-inspired flavor. Most of the five Children of Champions even had additional rules or brand-new Skills or Modifiers unique to their particular title. Then Fourth Edition-- even I, a dyed-in-the-wool 2e player-- recognize what an amazing feat Fourth Edition was. Fourth edition took everything from everywhere-- everything found in previous editions, previous Champions-rules games, and all the previously published material, re-polished and re-chiseled and re-named and re-branded everything until it worked into one cohesive system (except EDM. That's just a bugbear no matter what you do with it) in which everything worked with everything else. It was incredible! Most incredible? It was _completely_ backwards compatible! Change END costs back to 1/5; change Range Modifiers back to what they were (usually 1/4) and bam! old school could use all the new stuff, too. It was a Golden Age for HERO, and one that I confess to missing terribly. But life goes on until it doesn't! Or, as my grandfather would tell me when I felt crushed, "it either kills you or it don't. If it didn't, you can either keep going, or waste a hell of a lot of time and effort pretending that it did." With the combining of all the rules into one book, HERO had, perhaps unintentionally; until I meet Bruce Harlick, I'll never know for sure, created a vacuum for those folks who played those Champions-based games that were not actually Champions. Thus, the genre book was born-- there was a need for more specificity: how do I use the rules in this kind of game? What are the core themes that make this genre a unique environment in which to play? And all that room! Those big, vast 200-page and more books! Not only were there notes on the genre, but details and, when appropriate, histories of the genre, typical recurring themes of the genre, example characters, suggestions for running games over-all and your favorite genre in particular. (Oddly, the closest we ever got to Justice, Inc was Dark Champions, and frankly-- that ain't real close.) Still, as talented people set out to write these books, they would realize that the conventions of many genres required additional rules not in the new Fourth Edition rules. Why not? Well, when players opened a box labeled "Espionage!," they instinctively knew what the them was-- what the conventions were, and their mindset slipped into that with ease. The rules had been custom-tailored to keep that feel all the way from learning to play to closing a ten-year campaign. It was much harder to get that feel if you _knew_ that you were using a flavor book to recolor a set of rules for a superhero game. How to get that genre feel? In addition to all the above-mentioned things, writers of these books often discovered things unique to that genre-- well, perhaps "unique" is too-strong a word. They discovered things that were taken for granted in the main rules, but that were important to the flavor of a particular setting-- adding new Characteristics is an excellent example, as is Quick Draw and Hip Shot. So these things were added as additional rules, right there in your genre book. New Skills, new rules, new ideas-- all designed to custom build your unique genre-themed experience. Steve Long would again, many years later, do what Harlick had done before him, and compile everything into one vast tome. But even then, there were genre books. The 5e genre books were full of exposition, and full of examples and ideas.... But they just didn't have the same feel as the 4e books. The tiny print, the pages crammed with information overload, the general "sameness" of each book. In spite of all the new genre books-- most of them larger than the entire Fourth Edition!-- they simply didn't have the same feel as those old books. At the end of the day, they were exhaustive setting books. There were a few new things here and there-- a new modifier or two, that sort of thing. But there was just a bit of flavor missing. Not the fault of Mr. Long, to be sure. It felt more like his desire to cram in as much information as he could, as much finite detail as possible, was simply... overwhelming. There was just too much to make for fun light reading. To be completely fair, they are _all_ far and above what I could have done; I lack the Speed Reading and Speed Writing perks that Mr. Long is blessed with, and they perfectly suit his "Research: 23-- " Skill Rolls. I will also say, that in spite of my less-than-love for Fantasy, Tuala Morn was probably the most perfect support book written for 5e. (I know: it's not a genre book; I hold it up as an example because, if I remember correctly, Mr. Long wrote it, and it was wonderful. I want it to be abundantly clear that I am _not_ criticizing the most over-worked man in the gaming industry. He's awesome! We just have different tastes in books. Period.) But much like my Rule Books, I want my genre books punchy and easy to read, with suggestions and ideas taking a more even portion of the book with new rules, historical information, character examples, and campaign suggestions. A nice even mixture, leaving plenty And that is one of the reasons I wanted to track down and permanently preserve the 4e genre books. They are, to me and many other fans of the older editions, about as perfect as a genre book can be. Not perfect (more on that in a minute), but very close. So why did I decide to do Western HERO first? Inspiration, I suppose. It has always been my favorite genre book; I used it for almost any genre. Why? Well let's face it: whether it's "cool and trendy" or not in this day of "everything should be dark and cold and we political intrigue and morose and somber themes, the western is _still_ the quintessential format for American entertainment. We don't see it as such, but even Tom Selleck in a loud Hawaiian shirt in an Italian sportscar was a cowboy sort of character, bucking the rules, using suave and charm to achieve his goals, and living how he wanted, when he wanted. He saved poor damsels every week from the oppression of the big ranchers uh, powerful men who would seek to crush them. We like the strong-willed independent-- often downright hard-headed hero who triumphs because he is brave and tough and refuses to backdown; who wins simply because he is right, and that, my friends, is justice. We like watching Charles Bronson go out into the mean streets and take on the bad guys, man-to-man, gun to gun. No matter what the flavor of the movie is, we still crave the westerns. Second, and most importantly: Western HERO, hands-down, was the single best genre book of 4e, period. No; not because it's a western. Frankly, that, I think, is why it was so under-circulated. People had already moved into the "westerns are dead" mindset, refusing to accept that a large chunk of what they really enjoyed was westerns with ray guns, or westerns with talking cars. I say that Western HERO was the best because not only did it follow the formula that I dearly love: equal mixes of important information like settings, history, tropes, and themes, combined with GMing advice, playing advice and a few new ideas thrown in that we use to this day: Quick Draw, for example. More than that, it contained what we now call "Adventure Seeds." Sturdy ones, too. Not the two-sentence things we call by that name, but full paragraphs for each one, helping a new GM really get a grip on the idea, and just how he can use it for his current story, and modify it for recycling later. There is an example adventure included that has maps-- not a map or two, but MAPS! Lots of them! Even a few smaller topographical maps (which, if you've never actually war-gamed, are really nice to gain that feel of range, isolation, cover, etc, when the shooting starts) There is an _entire_ train in this book! An entire town! And, for good measure, a smaller nearly-ghost town. The story is simple, but still lots of fun, and has tailoring suggestions for keeping it more-or-less on rails for newer players, or turning it into a full-fledged campaign. It follows nearly all the tropes of a good western book or movie without making you feel like you are being "forced" into the setting. Seriously, folks (at least, the two of you still reading at this point), this "sample adventure" is full enough and rich enough to have been marketed as a stand-alone adventure module (do we still call them that?)! And if that wasn't enough, there's a campaign setting, too. A starter campaign, set in the real historical town of Deadwood, complete with write-ups of many, many NPCs and real historical figures from the period. HERO games, under any publisher, has never produced another genre book anywhere near the caliber of this book, and for reasons I don't even understand, I very much wanted to make sure that not only would I have a permanent archive of this book (after my shock to discover my own copy had walked away), I wanted to find a way to share it with everyone who never had a chance to at least decide for themselves wether or not they wanted it. And that, friends and fellow fans, is why I'm doing Western HERO first. I've got a couple of images of "progress so far" posted in the Fantasy HERO forums, under the thread "browsing through the HERO store," if you want to take a peek at my quality goals for this and other projects. I was going to do an update, but I've done quite a bit of typing at this point. Time to get back to work! Duke EDIT LIST: P001, c1U, p1: Under first "E" and "S" in Western Hero splash banner: noise that shows on printing P003, c2, pLast: under second column and under right side of footer bar: noise P006, C1, p1: over first column, just left of center: Noise: three dots over "you're familiar" in upper margin P006, c1, p3: under last paragraph: Noise. Immediately under paragraph, then a spatter of three or four further below and to the left. Ghost margin on LH side P007, C1 (art page): noise up and down margin on left side of image. P008, (art page): noise in an arc around picture and both margins of both columns. Additional noise over "8" in footer bar P009, c1, pLast: noise under footer bar, mostly in center under page number p010, c2, p3: Noise in right margin near "see" p010, cBOTH, pLast: noise under each column P010, c1, pLast: noise directly to left of "If the" p010, C1, Banner: "Characters Based on Fiction and Legend": noise directly to right and just above banner p010, C2, pLast: noise directly under "rubbing shoulders." P011, c2, p1&2: noise between paragraphs: directly under "resemblance" p011, c2, p5: noise directly to the right of "surveyors for a" p011, c2, pLast: noise directly under last word on page p012, c1, p1: Noise directly to the right of "and entertainment." (last words of paragraph) P012, c1, p5: Noise below paragraph 5 above and to the left of --- 12 ---- P012, c2, p4: Noise directly left of "they generally." P012, c2, p2: Noise above the word protect on the last line of the paragraph P016, c2, bottom: Noise three patches, about an inch above the bottom of the page 2.5" below the picture, right margin inside - - P021, c1, Noise - above the R in Scholar P021, c1 Noise - just before the word Note; second para of Traveler skill enhancer P021, c2 Noise - an inch in from the numbers 21 top of page P021, c2 - Word PERKS is a touch difficult to read P021, c2, p1 Noise - below the rk in the word Perk P021, c2, p3 Noise - below the word Contact P021, c2, p4 Noise - .5” right of the word notorious P021, c2, p6 Noise - below the word the and above the picture slight right of P022, c2, p “Vehicles and Bases” Noise to the right of the word character’s P022, c2, bottom Noise - an inch below the m in simultaneously P023, c1, top Noise to the right of HERO P025, c1, bottom Noise - below the word is P025, c2, p1 Noise - beneath the l in ruthlessness P025, c2, above Susceptibility and Vulnerability - the y in the second word P026, c2, p2 Noise - after the word (Location P028, c2, p1 Noise - right of the word lengthen P029, c2 bottom Noise - below the —-29—— to the right of P031, c2, p6 Noise - beneath the “s” in the word those P032, c1, p3 Noise - above the word corridor P032, c1, p6 Noise - beneath the word medium P033, c2 Bottom of page, past the table roughly 2” from the margin edge P034, c1, p5 Noise - beneath the word “with” P034, c1, p9 - in the sentence The Blocking character and also “The character executing” the word “The” has the T and h joining together - not sure this can be fixed P034, c2,p3 Noise - above the word vs. P036, c2, p4 Noise - just past the word “and” P036, c2, p10 Noise - Beneath the word “vs” (second line) & “STR” bottom line P038, c2 Noise - outside chart wall -right of the phrase “Integrated Combat Maneuvers Chart” P038, c2 Noise - inside wall right side of line “Remove Cap & Ball Cylinder” P040, c2, p3 - Are we correcting the text as well? Holsters section third line “hipshooting holster does not the the bonus” one of those “the’s” should be “get” In the section where Clint and Billy are going through the motions there are some errors as well - want them corrected? P040, c2, p11 Noise - Above the word Break in the Being Covered section P041, c2, end of page Noise - to the right of—-41—- P043, c1, p8 Noise - Beside the picture right of the words Riding roll. P044, c2, bottom Noise beneath the word fall. P045, c1, Trampling paragraph - fifth line the word “of” is faded P045, c2, p1 Noise - left of the word he in the fourth line P045, c2, end of page Noise - beneath the word glass
  12. 1 point
    "Blood" was also a very popular prefix in comic names in the Nineties.
  13. 1 point
    SPELLS ARE FINITO!! At least the entry. There is still some proofreading and such that needs to be done but they are all entered. Phew!
  14. 1 point
    Cygnia

    Order of the Stick

    New one up! http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots1152.html
  15. 1 point
    "Birdnose help Grundy?" This is the second time in 2 days that I heard this specific phrase regarding this specific movie.
  16. 1 point
    In the earliest days in our Champions games (1e) the PCs were all 250 points to start, so there was not very much point diversity, and our teams very much followed the X-Men/Avengers paradigm. Our group at the time was very much Marvel heads, and kind of curled our lip at Superman, as a Deus Ex Machina in a red cape The disparities arose when that first generation of Champions characters, after two games a week, 2-3’experiejce points per game, over the course of two year, became 400 point veterans. Someone cycling in a new character had the benefit of player experience to build a much more efficient, and rules savvy character, but it was lacking the mileage, of the veterans. After buying back some disads, adding flash defense goggles, getting encrypted coms with the other team members, and a few more strength and con points, and a few levels, the veterans were polished by experience and became quite capable. Our GMs never even thought of allowing a new character being built for anything other than 250 points, for the first year, and when it was allowed, the resulting builds had more offensive and defensive capability then some of the vets, but also glaring gaps in their builds, sometimes resulting in “glass cannons”. However the new 250 pointers, were a bit under powered for their first few months, but because they were lower points than the veterans and knew it, were played more cautiously, working on tighter teamwork to compensate for any short comings. There are few things as satisfying as good, right, teamwork. Our teams would become expert set up artists, and were very effective (when we could assembles the band together) at convention games, bamboozling unfamiliar GMs with held moves, perfectly timed hay makers and fastball specials. As anti- social as some of my characters were, I was always a team player.
  17. 1 point
    Christopher

    what would you call this skill?

    We actually have a similar Thread: The downside would be that you can not make a police officer that is just bad at this part of the work. PS: Policing presumably also includes stuff like "doing Paperwork". Interogation in the Precinct setting Knowledge of the streets on your city part And if you give it to players, you can bet they will try to find new ways to use something so poorly defined. You know, stuff like it replacing Weapon Skill or even Weapon Repair skill for pistols, Quickdraw and just about any other gun related skill. I want to try something new for these challenges/questions, and that is to look how other Systems dealt with it. Warhammer Fantasy: Charm, Intimidate and event Torture might apply for a uncooperative witness (hates the police or whatever). But you need to know someone is lying/omitting something to even know to try. So that does not solve the problem. Gossip might work, but only for "easy" information. Stuff they want to talk about anyway or at least do not mind. But it is also a "Racial Skill" for all Humans. Shadowrun 4E: Assensing and the Judge Intentions derived score might be used to figure out someone is lying. Con, Negotiation and Leadership could be used to convince a unwilling informant Ettiquette might also have a palce (like Warhammer Fantasy Gossip) Hero 6E: Bribery, Charm, Interrogation, Persuasion can be used to convince a unwilling Witness Oratory might work too, if you do not know a specific person who might have omitted/lied towards you Conversation matche the Ettiquette/Gossip Scenario of the other systems. The way to get the low level information. Streetwise/High Society act as complimentary skills And we could not agree what even to use to detect a lie/omission I want to point out that OpenLegends has two interesting options for failing the roll: "Success with a Twist" (like an additional challenge at the next step) "Failure but the Adventure continues" (you might notice someone was lying and you need to apply interrogation) If it is information you need the players to have, you will have the alternative route pre-mapped (hopefully). But there is still a bonus to having good rolls. And my group just had a case where 3 Characters failed 3 Spot checks each in a row. For a critical piece of information.
  18. 1 point
    Seriously, that. The group I play with it can be like herding cats.
  19. 1 point
    Michael Hopcroft

    In other news...

    I've heard reports that he works hard at his craft and takes it very seriously. He also seems to have a near-encyclopedic knowledge of music, enabling him to effective parody and perform just about any type of pop song. Very few people can pull off hip-hop and then switch to doo-wop or "classic rock" in the same set within minutes of each other. In many cases, his parodies prove more durable than the songs on which they were based, and he's outlasted scores of the artists he's riffed upon.
  20. 1 point
    Previous trailer is after the new one. Nifty speed of Mercury effects.
  21. 1 point
    Starlord

    2018-19 NFL Thread.

  22. 1 point
    Simon

    HDv3 hiding windows

    If you're referring to editing a power or ability within a character, then you may have positioned the edit dialog off of the screen (happens if the screen resolution changes, for example). Delete the appPrefs.xml file before starting HD and all positions will be reset.
  23. 1 point
    Old Man

    2018-19 NFL Thread.

    Yes, we are all Rams fans now.
  24. 1 point
    Michael Hopcroft

    In other news...

    Now that's what I call a Lame Claim to Fame... 😉
  25. 1 point
    Okay, Chris: As promised, I'm going to give this a shot. Problem is that I have a lot of them, and I don't want to type all that any more than anyone wants to read all that. Like you, I'm a fan of "named powers." I don't require it, but I do suggest it. Usually mentioning that it helps to individualize your power from someone else's similar power, and that it can help you get a better feel for your character does the trick. Sometimes, the player just has to get comfortable with the idea that this is, for our groups, "normal." Also like you, i tend toward the +/- notations as well. This, however, I adopted because I noticed it was easier for new players to grasp the Advantages / Limitations concepts when they viewed them as "distinctly" positive or negative. But neither of those are rules, so let's move on: First, because I feel I am in positively esteemed company, I use the "break it completely or break your hand" rule (I tend to name house rules, too, but mostly because it makes them easier for players to remember for those who don't think they need to write stuff down ) similar to LL above. This came about when Street Fighter came to the Sega Genesis. Everyone remembers that bonus round, I know. When players start discussing how much END or how many punches kicks, etc, it takes to break a Lexus, well... you just try to head that off before it becomes an issue. I admit that I tend to let it slide a bit when PCs are fighting villains in power armor, for dramatic reasons. However, even then there is some downside for the bare-knuckled brawler without enough PD to absorb his own damage in that regard (it's just not much when they are actually fighting the bad guy. Who wants to discourage that?! ) I have found this one also let's the energy projectors appreciate their value even in close-quarters combat. But that's just a feeling, and could be completely wrong. Your first player character cannot have electrical powers. You're first villain cannot have electrical powers. Yes; this a real house rule. I have no stinking _clue_ how it happened, but we went through a period of lots of new players drifting in and out of the session during the 4e Renaissance, and I swear to you, we and no less than six different people across a period of a year all create electrically-themed characters, and every one of them wanted to use the name "KillerWatt." Was there a movie or something? And that brings us to the related house rule: No joke characters. Seriously. We've all done it at some point. We've come up with a great pun or a comical theme, or whatever. The problem comes up when you actually start to _like_ the way the character is shaping up. You start taking him seriously, and wanting to do more with his development, etc. But you gave him that one extra little power to create ladders from thin air and called him The Panty Raider. No. Just no. Don't get me wrong: I don't run a grim and dark game. I don't even run a hardcore game. Hell, I don't run an _especially_ serious game, but it _is_ serious enough that we have believable (comic-book wise) stories, plots, and characters. Sometimes, we might do a light-hearted and humorous game to break tension or before starting a new campaign. Use your joke guy then. Those have yet to go more than three sessions, and they're for blowing off steam anyway. For the most part: no joke characters. Sit down at the table _knowing_ that you _want_ to be teamed up with the other players; your character _wants_ and _enjoys_, for whatever reason, the knowledge that his teammates can rely on him as much he is able to rely on them. Leave that lone gun crap for the choose-your-own-adventure books. This is a co-operative game, and if you don't want to cooperate, there's no reason for you to be here. But these aren't really rules modifications, are they? These are house rules, but they don't relate much to play. Problem is I don't know which ones I've already discussed on the board. There are no special vehicle rules. You want a vehicle, you grab a character sheet and you build it. If you don't want certain traits-- EGO, INT, etc, (handy for computers, AI, the Ship who Sang, etc) you can sell them down to zero and spend the points elsewhere.. Size is emulated by Size Powers, mass by Mass Powers. Movement is emulated with Movement Powers. Defenses, etc: there is already a really great system for building anything, so we didn't see the need for special rules for vehicles when they came about. As a result, when they came about, we ignored them. We _did_ adapt the pricing though, for those characters who wanted to be assured that they wouldn't occasionally be deprived of them (for anyone else, it's still a big 'ol Focus, and since you're not paying points for it, it's not always handy). This rule came about, honest-to-Pete, the third session we played Champions. One of the characters had no movement powers of his own, and decided he wanted a motorcycle so that he could rush to the scene without being carried by the flying telekinetic. There were.... no rules for building a motorcycle. He, a people is a roughly motorcycle-sized. Let's use one of those people sheets and see what happens. Works great. Team bases are a plot device, period. There is too much obsession over them if the players use points to build them, and too much temptation on me to simply wring out a quick dungeon crawl on those nights when I've got little prepared. If your team wants a base, you got it: simple forensics lab; simple science labs appropriate to the skills on the team (plus 2 if you do your thing in your lab, plus more if you put some prep work and take your time), sleeping quarters, semi-private baths (two-rooms share the bath between them), conference room, lounging area, and a ping pong table for the speedsters to show off at. One lonely spire high above the roof for the Batmunch clone to hang out on. It's always dark there. It can be anywhere you want, so long as it's accessible by every member of the team using whatever movement powers they have at their disposal. It can look like whatever you want, too. This has worked out _way_ better for us in the long run, as people aren't obsessed about which points should go where, and who gets first crack and what, and who is going to hang back and guard the joint, etc, etc, etc. No one has picked out furniture or designed a floor plan since we instituted this, and I couldn't be happier. making a called shot (hit location charts are not used with supers, but periodically with heroic. I try to discourage it, but when someone needs to snipe someone or something....). If you make your roll, check the amount by which you made your shot. That amount can be used as a negative modifier for any armor activation rolls, if your target is wearing armor with an activation. Called shots again: If you missed your called shot, but your "to hit" roll would have succeeded as an uncalled shot, roll your location. The difference by which you made the shot can be used to "walk" that shot that many steps up or down the chart to your selected location. Sometimes you make it anyway. Killing Attack is not Stunning Attack (name of house rule). Killing Attacks have a default Stun Multiplier of 1. You can buy it up to 2. "real" guns, etc, are exceptions to this. I let them go to a multiplier of 3. After being presented an _extremely_ well-thought-out and well-researched argument many years ago, I also allow Killing Attack: Does not Stun. Evidently, the perfect samurai sword was able to remove a limb without the opponent suffering any pain. I didn't know that at the time. Ego Defense (MD) and Presence Defense (FD) are base-zero characteristics. It makes for a cleaner sheet, and it's easier for newer players to grasp than is ripping a characteristic in half and building it as a power. T-port can take a -0 Limitation: only to transport between dimensions. Dimensions are represented by Locations: ten fixed locations means ten dimensions. Floating locations are allowable for this, but you must first have a fixed location somewhere in that dimension to represent your familiarity with said dimension. "Mis-ports" can mean you go to a dimension you've never been to, or somewhere you've never been in a dimension you usually have access to anyway, or to the wrong fixed or floating location in your target dimension, depending on how badly you flubbed your roll. Desolidification isn't Invulnerability. Players are expected to define a reasonably common type of attack (special effects, usually) that will affect them, or a short list of unusual things that will affect them. If it's appropriate, other things may effect them as well (I don't abuse this, and everyone is aware of it before they make a character with this power). Mental powers will almost always affect Desolid characters. However, there are some desolid SFX that aren't affected by mental powers, too. Characters with Deslidification who have a vulnerability will suffer those attacks as normal while Desolid, unless their SFX makes it inappropriate. Which leads to: SFX trump mechanics. This is what I tend to call a 60/40 rule. Regardless of raw mechanics (I am vibrating so fast I can pass through solid matter, which means I am invulnerable! Fine. Solid objects pass right through you. KillerWatt is still going to stun the crap out of you, though, as is Professor Solar and his heat ray). In the interest of fairness, and as a nod to the mechanics, I don't usually allow full damage, and almost never allow BODY against a Desolid character if the SFX is not of those he chose to affect his intangible self. Does it depend on it, or is it linked to it? Linked caused some issued when later editions came out: Linked, for us, had always been a way to create a brand new power (and it was specified as such in the rules book). Thus, when you used one power, you used the other, period. After all, it was a single unified new power. Then later editions featured "Linked" between two powers that did _not_ have to be used together. That is, you could use one power by itself, but you could only use the second power if you were using the first power. Then there were the weapon examples (machine gun with a grenade launcher, if I remember right-- and I probably don't) that could use either power by itself or both together. Honestly, I think these could have been better handled as multipowers, so that's how I handled them, for a while. Then we added "Dependent." If you can use power 1 by itself, but can't use power 2 without power 1, then power 2 is Dependent on power 1. If you can't use one without the other, you have a whole new and unique power (if you want to define it as such. You can also say it's a machine gun with a flame thrower attachment; whatever) that you create with Linked. Equal portions. To keep things easier on me, you, and the assigned "check man" (the guy who keeps us both in line), if both powers in a Linked are attacks, they must have equal DCs. Thus, when you use it at "half power" or anything below full strength, there's a crap load less mathing and arguing about math. Equal portions here, too. If they are not both attack powers, then they must each cost equal END, and for the same math reasons. Shot clock. Yes; I actually use one. Well, a stop watch. Well, it was a stop watch; now it's an app. I don't use this one when there are new players, and I don't use it in small groups, and i don't use it when we don't have a wide variation in SPD scores (unless we're in a large group). There are nine players in my Brunswick group, so I use it there a _lot_. When it's your "go" (Your phase, your dex), you have fifteen seconds to announce your moves, or your considered to be "surveying the scene" for options. This has made combat _so_ much faster and easier. I don't feel bad about it, either. Fact is, the player has _plenty_ of time to study and do his tactics while everyone else is having their actions. There is only one reason that he shouldn't be ready to announce his actions when it's his go, and that is a question for the GM. If he has one, I will answer it, and then he has ten second. If he has two questions, or five, he still gets ten seconds. (Yes; that's less seconds, but rarely does the player not already know what he's going to do based on my answers). Monologues and PRE attacks: all you want, if there's four or less of you. If there's five or more, you can get one on your go and one other during the Turn. Continuing a PRE attack does not count against this, nor does continuing a monologue. Other players will continue to act during your monologue. Don't worry; in a well-disciplined group, I _can_ hear both of you. There are many, many more, but I feel like I have fairly contributed to your thread. If not, let me know, and I'll get some more up here. Oh-- almost forgot. I've recently been using Killer Shrike's idea of advancing Skills by assigning dedicated Eps for characters who roll "3" on a skill check, but I have modified it so that it has to occur and a particularly dramatic moment or on a particularly difficult Skill check. I include here even though it's not a rule of my own devising, it's right that I acknowledge the use of someone else's idea, i think. Good night, all. Duke
  26. 1 point
    Pariah

    What Have You Watched Recently?

    Crocodile Dundee. So very, very 80s.
  27. 1 point
    Lord Liaden

    "Neat" Pictures

    Or maybe, "the Day After Tomorrow?" 😛
  28. 1 point
    I don't know if it's a _good_ idea, but it's an idea. Unfortunately, it's a lot of up-front work for the GM. I'm thinking "cookbook" magic: every spell has a recipe of "ingredients" that are the specific items required for that spell. Problem is you will have to create that recipe. Going in a slightly different direction with that same root idea is something not unlike certain primitive medicine men used: Everything (well, for us, we won't do _everything_, but let's say everything related to making magic in your world) had innate magical qualities. Feathers from one particular bird granted celerity; feathers from another granted fierce fighting prowess. A strip of skin from a particular animal wrapped 'round the wrist heightened your pain threshold, etc, etc. Only the shaman knew how to unlock or utilize these abilities, and often there was a great deal of ceremony involved. But before I digress--- Working with that, prepare a short list (say, for starters, a dozen. Don't worry: if this works for you, you'll have a list of fifty before you know it) of items in your world that have magic properties. Give each item say.. I don't know.... four magic properties. These do _not_ have to be the only "magic properties" in your magic system. In fact, I would encourage you to have more than four; perhaps a dozen or even more, but no one item should have more than a small subset of those traits. Assign each of those properties a strength rating. Not too extreme, of course. Let's use one to four again. One of the properties could be (if you're interested) "doubles the effectiveness of X," where X is either a particular magic property, or to keep it nice and esoteric, a particular ingredient. You might even have a few items here and there that have only one or two traits, but at spectacularly high levels (the eye teeth of a blood enemy, or running water dipped from under an eclipse or something). Assume that, as-is, only four (I seem to be stuck here) ingredients can be used to create a magic spell / magic effect. Now build some spells. How about everyone's favorite example: Fireball. Let's say that you decide Fireball requires two properties: Fire and Wind (no; I'm not suggesting elemental effects; that was just a real easy example. I'll try harder next time ). So your magician has to build a focus / poultice / medicine bag / burnt offering-- whatever-- that is predominantly composed of Fire and Wind attributes. How much and how many? (No point in me deciding what kind or how rare, because that's the GM's department, and will depend on just how available you want magic to be ). Suppose, as an example, that each "attribute score" represents the number of AP that ingredient can contribute to a spell. If you happen to have four items-- say two with Wind attributes of 4 and two with Fire attributes of 4, you can build a 16 AP fireball. Not spectacular.... But let's say you have four items, and three of them have Fire 4, one of them has Wind 4, and two of them have Fire 3? 22 AP. Better. Nowhere near great, but better. Now let's say that one of them has "doubles the effect of Wind? Now you're at 26 AP. Suppose another had the trait "doubles the effect of Salamander mucous, which you happen to be using as two of the Fire 4 ingredients.... Now you're at 34 AP. You can, of course, rate an item as high as you want. You can require certain AP levels of individual traits. You can require only one trait, or you can require six. This is just a bare-bones, seat-of-the-pants answer. You could raise the number of ingredients allowed per sack of magic, or you could even have items that allow the addition of up to X number of additional items, or even X number of additional items with a particular trait.... Look; I could go on with this all day, because shamanistic magic plays to a personal strength: it's one of the magic concepts I enjoy most, and have used quite a bit in low fantasy settings, and even a couple of western campaigns where I wanted get a bit eerie with the old west. You think the crazy old medicine man is joke? Probably because you've never seen him in his bear form..... Now as I said: it's not necessarily a good idea, for your purposes (though it's kind of fun seeing your magic-reliant party members track inventory, consult books, select ingredients and discard others, etc), but it is an idea. There may be _something_ there you can use. Duke
  29. 1 point
    Seriously though the Master mind, iirc, was the best. 50pts and your villain can have anything he or she needs or wants!
  30. 1 point
    Lord Liaden

    "Neat" Pictures

    He still wears the scarf with panache.
  31. 1 point
    Cygnia

    2018-19 NFL Thread.

  32. 1 point
    massey

    Medal of Honor Scene

    That's why he got the Medal of Honor. Really good rolls.
  33. 1 point
    Cygnia

    "Neat" Pictures

  34. 1 point
    I think personally every player should GM a scenerio or two. Just so the player has the feeling of the other side of the screen. I know since I’ve been a GM, when I’m the player, I do things in game and build things as characters to help the GM. For example I took a DNPC of a Master for my (surprise) martial artist, I could tell the GM wanted him (the Master) to disappear. So I improvised a scene where the Master could leave unnoticed. Another was for my dwarf. I lived away from the group at the time so I made a character that could come and go as needed. Hence he was cursed by the Cult of the Anvil and at various times a fog would come and take him away.
  35. 1 point
    I love the Turakian Age and it is where I've set all of my numerous Fantasy Hero campaigns. If I ever get off my butt and finish writing it (I'm actually about 50% done the first "book") (and figure out how to get some decent art for it) I'd start third-party publishing some mini-linked-modules/campaign for the setting. It has all been "playtested" a few times now, I just really need to devote more time to trying to finish writing it (well writing out the first 3-4 linked adventures that would be the start of the campaign).
  36. 1 point
    Cygnia

    "Neat" Pictures

    It's Tom Baker's 85th birthday today.
  37. 1 point
    The thing is that Damage Reduction is ideal for Solo Boss Combatants in Hero, Giant monster or not. On the one hand it only affects damage past defenses, so you leave those mediocore. That way everyone in the team can chip in to bring the enemy down. On the other hand, it affects the check if you are "Stunned". Wich makes it a ton less likely that the Villain is getting stunned. And getting stunned is a huge issue if you are literally the only character on your side. And it is also easily "slapped onto" any existing villain, if you decide Ogre should be buffed by the plot to become the Solo Villain for today. Actually "Kaiju" are a perfect example of enemies that: Have to fight a whole superhero team on their own Do not have minions For me DR is just a mechanic like everything else. You already made half the connections by giving the Solo Villains called "Kaiju" DR. Now you just need to generalize it for all Solo Villains (that actually act alone in this adventure)
  38. 1 point
    Lucius

    The Turakian Age is Seriously Underrated

    Also crossposted from rpg.net Panorama of a lush rolling plain, scattered groves thick with trees, a river gleaming in the distance. The camera pans around to show a mounted group of typical adventurers who have obviously just come over the crest of a ridge - an obvious female Elf and male Human armed with bow and sword, and a male Dwarf in plate armor with an ax. Narrator: It is a world in many ways comfortably familiar.... Striding uphill behind the group, and soon looming over them, appears the gray and rocky figure of a Stone Giant. The Elf looks back and up and asks "What do you see ahead, and what is the land telling you?" Narrator: Yet holding endless surprises. A world of Dragons ... Cut to a scene of people fleeing a burning town. An enormous green dragon lands right in their path so heavily as to knock them from their feet, before unleashing a blast of flame that conceals and presumably consumes them. Cut back to the Giant and companions. The Giant speaks in a voice deep as a mountain's root, "This land was cut by the plow, long ago, and then fell the heavy tread of a Dragon. We are closer. There is....something else...." Narrator: ...of Dungeons... Cut to a man framed from the waist up, chained to a wall, ghastly pale and unshaven, leeches clinging to his bare chest. His eyes open and focus on someone outside the camera view. "Why don't you let me die?" A cultured voice responds "Very well. Here is a vessel of poison....I am content for you to die now." All that is seen of the speaker is a scarlet sleeve and a pale hand holding an earthenware bottle covered in script resembling insects and crawling worms, presenting it to the lips of the victim, who drinks thirstily, then chokes, gasps, and goes limp as the leeches fall away. His head then begins to melt, before reforming into something slimy and grey and mostly featureless, the mouth becoming a circular and obscenely pulsing sucker. The unseen voice continues "Die...and rise again to feed upon the blood of the living." Cut back to the Giant, still speaking "...in hidden places under the earth, foul things are done. The Dragon, Skarm the Desolator, is not the only evil thing in this land." The Human says "Sounds like we came to the right place. Tell me again why we're here?" The Dwarf answers "Because Dragons always have gold." The Elf responds "Because we're heroes." Narrator: ....and of Demons Cut to the courtyard of a ruined castle. The archers are firing into a looming inky black form with spidery legs and long snaky arms looming at the far end of the courtyard. The arrows simply strike the blackness and vanish into it. "No gold is worth this" declares the Dwarf. "We must be heroes then" answered the Human, drawing a sword and charging, followed by the Dwarf as the Elf continues to ply the bow. The Demon seizes and hurls one of the great stones fallen from the ruined wall, which the Human evades by dropping prone. Black fluid sprays as the Dwarf strikes, then he is seized and held aloft. Close up shows the ropy black tentacles exuding a slime that corrodes the armor and eats right through the ax haft until the ax head falls away. Cut to the Elf apparently whispering to an arrow before nocking and loosing it; there is a burst of light when it strikes, and the Demon shrieks and drops the Dwarf. The head and long sinuous neck of a Dragon - the same one seen earlier - rises over the castle wall to glare at the Demon, which cowers down and then sinks into the ground. The dragon turns its gaze to the adventurers and opens its maw. Dissolve to flame. Title card appears in the flames: TURAKIAN AGE The Desolation of Skarm (Brought to you by Hero System) Lucius Alexander This preview has been approved for all palindromedaries
  39. 1 point
    Lucius

    The Turakian Age is Seriously Underrated

    Crossposted from RPG net
  40. 1 point
    TA is my go-to fantasy game setting: Recognizably "generic" yet with a number of distinctive elements; broad and detailed but with plenty of room to elaborate; almost every location having plot seeds ripe for development. Admittedly, I've made a large number of modifications to the history and geopolitics of Ambrethel to suit my own priorities and preferences, but I couldn't and wouldn't have done so without having been given such a solid frame to hang them on. Previously I posted to the forums what I would suggest if I were a GM (or writer) looking to further develop a place in the Turakian Age world as home base for my campaigns. I would look for a spot with plenty of story hooks built in, but also lots of unspecified room to expand upon. I'd want the home base to be large enough to be interesting, but small enough to be manageable. I would prefer it to be able to support a variety of adventure styles without going very far afield: wilderness exploration, city skulking, dungeon crawling, monster fights, political intrigue, military conflicts, etc. But I'd also like there to be ready potential for PCs to travel to other interesting places, as their abilities and ambitions grow. On the largest continent of Arduna there are two enormous bodies of water which are the centers of vast geographic regions, with multiple kingdoms on their shores engaging in trade and political interactions: the inland Sea of Mhorec, and Lake Beralka. These two bodies are linked by the long Shaanda River, navigable along its entire length, making it one of the most heavily trafficked trade routes in the world, potentially bringing people from almost anywhere. There is no single state dominating the Shaanda; pairs of rival kingdoms are at each end, but the central stretch contains several independent small cities and large towns. The largest of these cities, Ishthac, is smack-dab at the middle of the river (according to the included map). One would expect the larger kingdoms at the ends of the Shaanda to vie for control over the strategic central river. One of those kingdoms, Valicia, is ruled by a powerful wizard with ambitions of conquering the whole region (and who makes for a fine "big bad" for a campaign). But the cities of the Shaanda are described as too independent and clever to be ruled. To me this implies that they probably cooperate to defend themselves and play the kingdoms against each other; but that doesn't preclude rivalry among the cities themselves. Otherwise the Shaanda cities are given little further definition -- nothing about city layout, population, society, government, or the like. Ishthac lies at the south-western edge of the huge, rugged Valician Hills region, said to be populated by "monsters" which sometimes raid the river settlements; as well as independent-minded "hill folk" with only a few other clues as to their nature. The Valician Hills also rest above one of the largest regions of the "Sunless Realms" (TA's analogue to D&D's Underdark). Somewhere within the hills is a hidden coven of powerful witches whose agenda is unknown. Chonath, a large ancient ruined city once the home of mighty magicians, and now monster-infested, is perhaps a hundred and fifty miles west of Ishthac. Traveling a couple hundred miles along the Shaanda River in either direction from Ishthac will take you into the territory of the larger kingdoms, and the dangers and intrigues they feature. From there it's a relatively short trip to the Sea of Mhorec or Lake Beralka, and ready transport to half the continent. I also previously posted a set of plot seeds set in one area of Ambrethel which IMO is particularly well suited to a campaign inspired by A Song of Fire and Ice/ Game of Thrones, emphasizing politics and diplomacy more than fighting and looting: Besruhan Intrigues.
  41. 1 point
    Ternaugh

    What Have You Watched Recently?

    The Thin Man: Nick Charles (William Powell) drinks his way through a missing persons case around Christmas with the help of his wife, Nora (Myrna Loy), and their dog, Asta. (DVD) After the Thin Man: Nick continues drinking his way through a murder investigation involving Nora's relatives after arriving back in San Francisco by train at New Year's. (DVD) Both are a lot of fun, and I'll be working my way through the rest of the movie series.
  42. 1 point
    assault

    Golden Age

    To point out the obvious, preventing PCs from being drafted is an out-of-character concern. In character, the question is why were they rejected when they volunteered?
  43. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Hero Does It Better

    If I may address one possibility that hasn't been mentioned: The workload will vary considerably depending on a selection of things: How involved are the players in creating and maintaining the universe? Do they enjoy fleshing out their own backgrounds, their own Hunteds or other bits of their history that will fall into the campaign universe? Are they allowed to? Do they create a few villains or other NPCs for the world at large? Are they willing to bounce around some ideas of the technology or scope of the game universe? And as for the GM who creates the world: each GM is as different, ultimately, as any two people. Some like the growth of the world to be organic, developing with the history the players are creating, allowing the world to grow and unfold as fits the needs of the story. Which personally, I think is great, because it saves me a _lot_ of front-loading. Why design eighteen alien races and thirty-five populated worlds for those stars a few parsecs spinward, just to have the party head the other way and never look back? Of course, this has the side-effect of making sure that everything gets recorded, because you're making cannon as you go. It's not really a big deal-- well, I'm really tired of typing, but let's say that there are ways to make this lighter on you, too. If they work in your group. Also, there are those GMs who _hate_ letting the story spin on wherever, or who aren't comfortable having to make up something appropriate and remember it forever. There are also those guys for whom the _best_ fun is from planning and mapping and designing every single aspect of the world, right down to the political situations on a thousand planets. They want to map all the continents, design all the ships, and place every city and plant in the entire universe before the game begins. They want a thousand years worth of established lore, and want the players to ooh and aaah over a marvelous and complete and ready-to-be-explored world. For those guys, starting a new campaign is a _huge_ job that takes time not just to do, but to research in order to do. I should know: I used to be one. Players being what they are, I realized that less than half of a percent of my efforts were _not_ wasted, and eventually just resorted to plotting out a few things "local" to the players, some crib notes on where they are and where they could be, plopped up a short list of characters, races, whatever, and places, and designed the "must have" and "will always be x" (such as magic be this" or "FTL work so" or "country X hate you and your guts" )points into a bullet list. I could plop what I wanted where it needed to be as we went along. Either way, the players still saw what they were going to see, and I saved months of prep work. A little heartbreaking, but I found I really enjoyed the side-effect of the world becoming something that we _all_ created. And then there are the players. How do you craft something they will be interested it? What happens if they _aren't_ interested, or at least aren't intrigued by the "right" parts of your universe? You've got to make contingencies. A few scenarios, a few different scenarios, and a few more scenarios that can change one to another. Etc. Either way, a lot of it comes right down to the kind of GM you actually _are_, and what you, as the GM, enjoy doing as part of your campaign planning. If someone is happy being one type of world builder, I wouldn't ask them to change for anything. I mean, we play because we like it, right?
  44. 1 point
    Cygnia

    "Neat" Pictures

  45. 1 point
    Cancer

    Hero Does It Better

    I played RPGs in '75-'78, a bit in the very early 80's, but then gave it up and got back in only late in 1988. Had characters die back in those early days; not so much after the hiatus in the '80s. Almost exclusively a fantasy gamer in RPGs (until the '90s), but I was a hexgrid wargamer starting Christmas 1967 through 1978. The Gygax pontification Old Man linked ... goes back to a different time, an era of badly "designed" game systems where characters got killed for dumb reasons (Runequest = notorious here) or even in character creation (yeah, I'm not a great fan of that happening in Traveler) and gross lack of understanding of probabilities. There was one supplement (I want to say City State of the Invincible Overlord here, but it's been too long for me to be sure of it) where any given character stood a good chance of not making it through a day before being attacked by an angry god purely due to random encounters, and you had a vanishingly small probability of making it through a week, unless you had crooked dice. Gygax showed his background as a miniatures battle gamer, where there could be no personification of the player into the pieces on the table, unless of course the player puts himself on the table in the persona of the Napoleon figure. It also reminds me (in terms of tone and patronization) of some of the later diatribes that came out against "silly" games that existed before Paranoia but had much the same flavor, and of course Paranoia itself, where the point was to get all your clones/characters killed in patently stupid ways, preferably with as much collateral damage as possible. We in our group try different systems frequently, but I actually think the last real RPG in-game player character death we've had at our table was in a HERO System superheroes campaign. The GM overreacted to a back-rank character's overly effective ranged power (ranged Entangle against Ego Combat Value) and started teleporting literally rampaging uber-bricks into the PCs' back rank. Another less-experienced player had bought his alpha-strike power with some big defensive weakening (full turn at DCV 0 and some other unfortunate "features"), so the berserk uber-brick thin-red-misted him in one charge. AND the players were all required to have the CvK psychlim, and I all but had a shouting argument with the GM demanding why I couldn't shoot him in the back of the head with the anti-tank rocket since nothing else had slowed him down. The versatility of HERO means players and GMs can go way out into their corners and do stupid things if they are both making invalid assumptions about what players and GMs will do. In this situation, HERO doesn't do it better, if avoiding character deaths is what we're talking about, because it can enable newbs to do the character-building equivalent of putting the four-year-olds in with the gun collection with live ammo and no supervision. Here on these boards we are pretty much all HERO grognards and know not to do that. A roomful of people new to the system may build stuff that'll get multiple characters killed in a single dozen-segment round. For all we know, more than a few people had exactly that experience and decided it was too bloody a system and went looking for something else.
  46. 1 point
    Michael Palin Diaries 1969-1979 The Python Years. This covers the entirety of the Monty Python series and the Python films upto Life of Brian and Palin's Ripping Yarns. It covers the background, filming etc. Very good.
  47. 0 points
    tkdguy

    In other news...

    It is raining in the San Francisco Bay Area, so I get to miss out on another eclipse yet again.
  48. -1 points
    Hugh Neilson

    Improving Intimidation

    If StatMan has to pay double for abilities MagicMarvin and SkillMonkey pay standard cost, who will actually be disadvantaged? StatMan pays 50 points for +30 STR, so he has 40 STR. Along comes Magic Marvin with his Mighty Thews spell (+50 STR for the same 50 points), which has a minor "only to activate" limitation. Now who is overpowered? I do agree with niche enforcement, but your limiting of characters example would work just as well with no NCM. Seems like it is StatMan's niche getting trampled. Any ability StatMan buys at double cost can be matched by a spell which has no NCM for passing any breakpoint. Tossing out NCM does not mean tossing out all oversight for balance. Show me the builds for StatMan, SkillMonkey and MagicMarven - each designed efficiently, under NCM or not, - and let's see the huge overpowering impact characteristics provide. So why isn't 60 STR (40 of which is "only if he never cuts his hair, -0" so it is limited and NCM does not apply) overpowered? My -0 is, of course, somewhat facetious, but we can simply make it Gestures only to Activate for a Spell of Great Might, and a similar Grace of the Cat spell to bump DEX similarly. If the issue is niche enforcement, reduce total points available and avoid the need to double the cost of anything.
  49. -1 points
    Diamond Spear

    2018-19 NFL Thread.

    After watching yesterday’s two games I am officially done with the NFL. Between the Saints being robbed of the win by that non-call and the Chiefs not even getting a chance to play offense due to the league’s asanine overtime rules I just can’t take it anymore. I’m not a fan of any of the teams that played yesterday but between officiating that’s at best wildly inconsistent and an overtime format that quite literally comes down to a coin flip I can’t take it seriously anymore. Looks like I’m down to two pro sports now.
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