Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
dsatow

Do you believe Mimicry is an Int or Pre based skill?

Do you believe Mimicry is an Int or Pre based skill?  

13 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you believe Mimicry is an Int or Pre based skill?

    • INT
      7
    • PRE
      1
    • Neither, it should be a general skill or talent.
      5


Recommended Posts

Before answering with a rules page or quote from the rule, I know the official answer.  What I'd like to know is your opinion.

 

Do you believe Mimicry is an Int or Pre based skill?

 

If you think your answer differs from other peoples opinion, please explain why in the comments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Considering disguise is an INT based sill, and mimicry is basically disguising your voice it should also be a INT based skill.  

 

PRE based skills are skills that involve interacting with other creatures.  While mimicry often also deals with interacting with other creatures sometimes it does not.  Mimicry could be used to fool a device like a computer or voice activated security system. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, but the real point here is that it doesn't matter how smart you are.  Mimicking a voice is a physical adjustment to create the new voice.  I think there's considerable similarity to, say, singing.  With no training, people have both a range and (often) a key where they're comfortable.  Learning how to switch keys yet stay *on* key....is a skill that needs training and practice.  So is switching between your different voices.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem with mimicry is that to be good enough to impersonate people is really tough.  Some people just can't do it or can only do a few people within a degree of similarity to their own voice.  This doesn't seem like the mimicry which you see in movies or even impersonators do who will often say its also mimicking the mannerism and approach-ability of the character which in turn sounds like PRE to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without giving it too much thought . . .

 

I think the key to Mimicry would not necessarily be how well you "project" (which would be PRE), but how well you "perceive" the sounds other people make, in order to imitate them.

Which would lead me more to INT.

 

Personally, I don't think of myself as having any real musical talent, I can pick out a tune on a piano, but that is about it.

However, when dating a girl who owned a violin, I was able to produce a recognizable tune from that after a few minutes, never having played one before, because I knew exactly what the tune I was playing should sound like.

 

So, I don't think that Mimicry would allow someone to get up on stage and perform like Frank Sinatra, but with a little practice they could pretend to be Frank Sinatra during a brief phone call by having a high enough INT to mentally record and reproduce exactly how Frank Sinatra sounds when talking.

 

Another personal example:

There is a fellow that works at our local Costco.The first time I met him, I realized he sounded exactly like a minor character on an episode of The Big Bang Theory that I had seen once, months before that. His voice is fairly unique, but I think that was more a question of perception (INT) to record the information that would have helped me imitate him if I wanted to, than projection (PRE) to deliver the imitation.

 

However, I can see that having a very low PRE could be a drawback when trying to Mimic someone.You could have the ability to Mimic, but be too shy to pull it off.

 

Just some random thoughts at four in the morning . . .

 

KA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making your words sound like ExampleMan's is INT.  It's 100% about experiencing, recalling, and reproducing a sensory stimulus. 

Acting like ExampleMan, including picking the same words ExampleMan would, is Acting and thus PRE. 

Successfully imitating ExampleMan for an extended period is INT and PRE. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impersonating a person would fall under acting not mimicry.  Mimicry would be a complementary skill, but the primary sill would be acting.  The first line in the description of acting even mentions speech patterns.  Mimicry by itself allows you to alter your voice so the tone and pitch matches the person being mimicked, but does not cover things like accents and speech patterns.  Those would be done by acting which is a PRE based skill.

 

Many tasks actually require more than a single skill to pull off properly.  That is what the complementary skill rules are for. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talent.

 

You can understand every nuance of the voice or sound you hear.  You can know precisely what must be done to your vocal chords to recreate those sounds.  Being physically able to do it, however, is beyond your control at any level of training.  It's like wiggling your ears, of shifting your scalp, or twitching your nose.  Either you have the base mechanisms to do this, which you can then experiment and play with, or you don't.   If you don't have an elongated frontalis muscle, you aren't going to wiggle your scalp. 

 

With rare exceptions, every human being can use their vocal chords.  Most of us will find our voices vary considerably under various stressors, but they will remain our voices.  Some of us can do character voices of a sort-- not all of us.  Some folks, no amount of training will let us create a sounds that isn't our voice.  Even those that can do character voices can't necessarily do _someone else's_ voice.  Or birdsongs.  Or animal grunts and growls.

 

The fact is that the largest chunk of mimicry is a direct result of something that _can't_ be trained for:  the ability to alter the length, thickness, and tension of the vocal chords far in excess of what most people can.   How much enervation and how much musculature is devoted to the larynx is not something you can change through study or practice.  Like flexing your Eustachian tubes: either you have the voluntary muscles in place, or you don't.  You can't just grow them because you studied really hard.

 

Even people with the ability to produce an unusually wide range of sounds may not be able to produce a wide enough range to genuinely mimic-- to perfectly recreate a sound or voice done by someone else.  Billy West, for example, does one of the worst Nixons I've ever heard, but he's one of the best voice guys in the business.  Rich Little did far fewer unique voices that West is known to do, but he did an astounding range of other people's voices, which is something that West really can't achieve.

 

I won't deny that there is lots and lots and lots of endless practice and understanding of nuance-- all those things that could class this as an INT Skill-- present in the act of mimicry.

 

I won't deny that PRE plays a factor in really selling the impersonation you're putting forward, whether it's the voice of a general, or a world leader, or the creaking of a rusty furnace.

 

But if you were not born with the proper mechanisms to make this all possible through voluntary control-- that is, if you weren't born with the rudiments of the talent-- there isn't enough brains or charisma on earth to make it happen anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve got to go with it being a general skill.  You can be the smartest person in the world and not having the ear or vocal ability to be a good mimic. Presence is a good stat for acting but again, a certain range of vocal agility is needed for mimicry.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...