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These are military templates, converted to 6th edition from my "Global Task Force Omega vs. the World Terror Front" Danger International game.  

 

I haven't run any of these through Hero Designer, so there may be errors.  And there may be straight up military errors as well; feedback and corrections from other prior service members here are welcomed.  

 

(The document is here and that's what I'll keep most up to date.)  

 

Military Hero

Adapted from GTFO vs. WTF.  Any errors are mine; any assistance correcting them is appreciated!  

 

Stat Blocks

Choose one from the spreadsheet.  

 

Total Cost:  65 points

 

Skills

Everyone gets the Basic Military Template.  

 

Basic Military Template

3     Breakfall

3     Climbing

3     Concealment

1     Paramedic 8-

1     Stealth 8-

3     Survival

1     KS: Enemy Forces 8-

2     KS: Theater Operations 11-

2     KS: Military Procedure 11-

2     PS: Soldier/Sailor/Airman/Marine 11-

4     WF: Small Arms, Light Machine Guns, Handheld Grenade Launchers

5     +1 with Ranged Combat

 

Total Cost:  30 

 

The Basic Military Template represents a typical combat-oriented troop, especially one that comes out of US Army basic training or US Marine Corps boot camp.  

 

The Background Skills listed above are as follows:

 

KS: Enemy Forces.  This refers to the general training military members receive about the forces of countries that are opposed to the US.  These will usually refer to Russia, China, North Korea, and various Middle Eastern or Central American countries.  Coming out of basic training, a character typically has an 8- in this skill; AIT, A-school, or tech school will move this up to 11-, and will usually specialize in forces based in whatever theater the individual is ultimately assigned to.  

 

KS: Theater Operations.  This refers to specific operational knowledge of the theater the individual will ultimately be assigned to, and refers as much to unwritten rules and customs as it does to anything learned in a classroom.  "FNGs" or "newbies" straight out of secondary training might not have this skill at all, or if they do it will be at 8-.  

 

KS: Military Procedure.  This includes general knowledge about the military the individual learns in basic and secondary training.  It usually refers more specifically to the individual's home service, but most characters will learn a fair amount about other services, especially regarding their officer ranks and when to salute.  Any character coming out of secondary training should have this at 11-; most characters will have 11- in this by the time they complete basic training. 

 

PS: Soldier/Sailor/Airman/Marine.  This represents the character's day to day ability to function as a professionally trained member of their branch.  It includes things like drilling/marching, the wearing of the uniform, grooming standards, military bearing, and so forth.  Career military members might have this at 12- or 13-.  

 

Taking one stat block and the Basic Military Template puts a character at 95 total points.

 

Everyone also gets up to 15 points worth of options from the Personal Skills Template:

 

Personal Skills Template

Options:

 

5     Additional Skill +1

3     One of:  Brawling (Talent: +1d6 HA), Additional Skill, or Skill Enhancer

2     KS: _____ (interest or academic study) 11-

2     PS: _____ (hobby or past job skill) 11-

1     One of:  Language (1 point) or Weapon Familiarity (choice)

2     Additional Skills or Characteristics (choice)

 

This template is largely optional, and represents skills, knowledges, or abilities the character may have brought with them from their time before enlisting.  Sometimes these will prove helpful to the character in their MOS.  If the character doesn't take these specific skills, they may spend up to 15 points on similar items, or ignore them entirely.  

 

Stopping here leaves the character at 110 points, assuming they spend the full 15 points from the Personal Skills Template.

 

MOS's

The most expensive MOS package is the Navy Seal at 45 points, bringing the character to a total of 155 points.  Decide how many total points characters will be (150-175, depending on the campaign).

 

Everyone gets at least one MOS.

 

11B

MOS 11B refers to an Army infantryman.  In the Army, every soldier is considered infantry at their core; the Basic Military template above refers to a bog standard infantryman.  The following MOS templates represent other MOS's that are often assigned to infantry platoons.  

 

  • Armourer/Mechanic
  • Comms
  • Demolitions Expert
  • Driver
  • Heavy Weapons Expert
  • Leadership
  • Marksman
  • Medic
  • Research/Intelligence

 

Armourer/Mechanic

5     Gunsmith +1

5     Mechanic +1

2     +1 to one of the above

3     +1 with Crafting Skills

3     +3 STR (max 20)

 

Total Cost: 18

 

Comms and/or Hacking

5     Bugging +1

3     Computer Programming

7     Electronics +2

5     Security Systems +1

3     System Operation

2     KS: Electronic Surveillance

2     KS: Radio Communications 11-

3     +1 with Electronics & Security Skills

 

Total cost: 30

 

Demolitions expert

5     1d6 Luck

7     Demolitions +2

1     Electronics 8-

1     Lockpicking 8-

1     Mechanic 8-

3     PS: EOD 12-

10   +1 Overall Level

3     +3 EGO

3     +1 Enhanced Perception

 

Total cost: 34

 

Driver

2     Area Knowledge (area of operations) 11-

5     Combat Driving +1

1     Mechanic 8-

3     Navigation

1     PS: Loadmaster 8-

2     TF:  Wheeled Military Vehicles, Tracked Military Vehicles, Large Motorized Ground

 Vehicles, Two-Wheeled Motorized Ground Vehicles (choose two)

5     +1 with Ranged Combat

1     WF: Vehicle Mounted Weapons

 

Total Cost:  20 points

 

Heavy Weapons expert

3     Gunsmith

1     WF: Light Machine Guns

1     WF: Mortars

1     WF: Heavy Machine Guns

5     +1 with Ranged Combat

3     +1 with one of the above

6     +3 STR, +1 PD, +5 END, +2 STUN

 

Total Cost: 20 points

 

Interrogator

3     Interrogation

3     Persuasion

3     Charm

5     Language (4 points plus Literacy)

3     Streetwise

2     PS: Intelligence Collection 11-

4     +1 with Interaction Skills

3     +3 PRE (max 20)

3     Perk: Security Clearance

 

Total Cost: 29 points

 

Medic

4     Paramedic (full skill) +1

2     KS: Anatomy & Physiology 11-

3     KS: Emergency Medical Protocols 12-

3     PS: Diagnosis 12-

2     +1 DEX

6     +3 EGO

4     Movement Skill Levels:  +2 with Running

 

Total Cost:  24 points

 

Navy SEAL (combat plus underwater)

20 Commando Training

3 KS: Scuba

3 PS: Scuba Instructor

5 +1 with Ranged Combat

6 +6m Swimming

8 +2 CON, +3 EGO, +1 PD, +5 END, +2 STUN

 

Total Cost: 45 points

 

Pilot

2     Area Knowledge (area of operations) 11-

7     Combat Piloting +2

1     Mechanic 8-

3     Navigation

1     PS: Loadmaster 8-

2     TF:  Small Fixed Wing, Large Fixed Wing, Rotary (choose one)

5     +1 with Ranged Combat

1     WF: Vehicle Mounted Weapons

3     Rank (officer)

 

Total Cost:  25 points

 

Research/Intelligence

2     AK: (area of operations) 11-

5     Languages

3     Linguist

3     Scholar

3     Three KS's relating to enemy forces/disposition/techniques at 11-

3     +1 to Perception 

3     +3 INT

5     Speed Reading

3     Perk: Security Clearance

 

Total Cost:  30 points

 

Search and Rescue

As Medic, plus:

 

4     +2 to Survival Skill

3     PS: Parachuting 12-

3     +3 STR

2     +2m Running

1     +2m Swimming

 

Total Cost: 13 points

 

Stealth expert

2     +1 to Concealment +1

4     Full Stealth +1

2     WF: Bows/Crossbows

3     +1 with Bows/Crossbows

5     +1 with Ranged Combat

2     +2m Running

 

Total Cost:  18 points

 

Finally, one or more of the following (not MOS's, but official or unofficial additions to any of the above):

 

Leadership

2     PS: Leadership 11-

1     Rank

 

Gym Rat

10     +3 STR, +3 CON, +1 PD, +3 REC

 

Hand-to-hand Combat Expert

5     +1 with Hand-to-hand Combat

 

Lucky

5     1d6 Luck

 

Marksman

6     +2 with a Small Arms weapon group

 

Runner

2     +2m Running

2     +2 REC

4     Movement Skill Levels: +2 with Running

 

Weapons Expert

5     +1 with ranged combat

 

Tough

5     +2 PD, +1 ED, +1 REC, +2 STUN

 

Fast

10     +1 SPD

 

Cool

6     +3 PRE, +3 EGO

 

Primary MOS

5     +1 with Primary MOS Skills

 

MWR Specialist

3     Bureaucratics

3     Charm

3     Streetwise

2     KS: Mixology

2     KS: Who Knows Who

1     PS: Barber, Tailor, or similar 8- (from before service)

3     Well Connected

5     Contacts

 

(MWR = Morale, Welfare, and Recreation.  This usually refers to recreational facilities on base, but here it's used as an inside joke to refer to the unit's horse trader, dog robber, wheeler dealer; this person usually ends up serving drinks at parties and giving their buddies emergency haircuts at $5 a pop the night before an inspection.)


Complications

The military works very hard at weeding out individuals with Complications, especially Physical, Psychological, or Social, that would tend to be disruptive to military discipline and unit cohesion.  That's not to say that some don't sneak through, but the character will likely have to work to keep them a secret.  

 

All active duty military characters will have the following Complications:

 

  • Distinctive Features: Uniform, Grooming, Military Bearing (conc.)
  • Hunted: Branch of service (more pow, frequently, NCI, large group, watching)
  • Social Complication: Subject to Orders 

 

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I spent a tour in the Army as an 11B and then went Navy where I retired as an ATC.

 

I would suggest renaming the Basic Military Template to Basic Army/Marine Template.

Then create two new templates called Basic Navy Template and Basic Airforce Template.

 

For the Basic Navy Template I’d suggest something like

3     Climbing
3     Paramedic  
2     Survival
3     Electronics/Mechanics/Navigation/Systems Operation (pick one)
2     KS: Enemy Forces 8-
2     KS: Theater Operations 11-
2     KS: Military Procedure 11-
2     PS: Damage Control 11-
2     PS: Fire Fighting 11-
2     PS: Soldier/Sailor/Airman/Marine (pick one) 11-
2     PS: Welder/Metal Working/Electrician/Electronics/Seamanship (pick one) 11-
2     WF: Small Arms

 

Total Cost:  27

 

I’m a 5th ed players so that is where I grabbed the costs.

Someone familiar with the Airforce would need to speak to that template.   But what the Navy needs is a large step away from what the Army or Marines need, especially combat arms.

And one last thing, the Navy doesn’t use the term MOS (Military Occupational Specialty), they use Rates (a descriptive occupational designation such as AT = Aviation Electronics Technician, ET = Electronics Technician, MM = Machinist Mate which are then narrowed into sub-specialties by the NEC (Navy Enlisted Classification).   An AT works on aircraft electronics (radios, radar, acoustic, etc) and an AT’s NEC identifies exactly which type of aircraft or system they specialize in.

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Awesome!  That's exactly the kind of feedback I was looking for.  🙂

 

On 10/16/2020 at 4:31 PM, Spence said:

And one last thing, the Navy doesn’t use the term MOS (Military Occupational Specialty), they use Rates (a descriptive occupational designation such as AT = Aviation Electronics Technician, ET = Electronics Technician, MM = Machinist Mate which are then narrowed into sub-specialties by the NEC (Navy Enlisted Classification).   An AT works on aircraft electronics (radios, radar, acoustic, etc) and an AT’s NEC identifies exactly which type of aircraft or system they specialize in.

 

Yep... it's AFSC in the Air Force   

 

I was USAF from 1988-1992, so in theory I'd be the one to write that... but they've added two weeks of, I'm told, actual combat arms training.  When I went through we learned how to shoot AR-15's chambered down to actual .22 caliber, with one day for classroom training and one day at the range.  

 

But I'll give it a go.

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17 minutes ago, Chris Goodwin said:

Awesome!  That's exactly the kind of feedback I was looking for.  🙂

 

 

Yep... it's AFSC in the Air Force   

 

I was USAF from 1988-1992, so in theory I'd be the one to write that... but they've added two weeks of, I'm told, actual combat arms training.  When I went through we learned how to shoot AR-15's chambered down to actual .22 caliber.  

 

But I'll give it a go.

 

For the Navy the ships security force gets the "combat" training as well as station security.  I also tried to stay RPG generic instead of too much detail.  Broad strokes for playing the game.

 

Spec Ops types like the SEALs are their own category and should, IMO not be lumped into the conventional templates.   I really don't know how much the various team skill sets blur together these days, SEALs, Raiders, Rangers etc.  Or if they even use the same names for the Army and Marines.  Out of my wheelhouse you could say.

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1 hour ago, Chris Goodwin said:

Spence, do you mind if I steal your Navy template?  Let me know what name you want me to credit. 

No problem, feel free. 

I would change the term "metal working" to "Structures".   It's a little more accurate since they do more than just the metal parts and are responsible for the entire structure.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Spence said:

No problem, feel free. 

I would change the term "metal working" to "Structures".   It's a little more accurate since they do more than just the metal parts and are responsible for the entire structure.

 

I'm going with Structural Metalwork, which should include metal parts as well.  

 

Do sailors come out of boot camp being trained in the professional skills (welding, etc.)?  I know Damage Control and Firefighting are definitely part of basic training. 

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4 hours ago, Chris Goodwin said:

Do sailors come out of boot camp being trained in the professional skills (welding, etc.)?  I know Damage Control and Firefighting are definitely part of basic training. 

Now I am bit out of date here, but in broad strokes this is fast overview of how things work.

 

In Basic training every sailor receives a very basic introduction to the overall Navy.  This includes basic structure as well as an intro to shipboard life and very basic critical skills such as general shipboard firefighting and damage control.

 

From basic most sailors will then go on to their Rating’s A School.  Ratings are how the Navy defines a person’s job.  The list of ratings has changed over time as technology has changed.  Some Ratings have been retired and some are “new”.  Over time some have even been combined.  But for our purposes think of the Rating as a person’s career field.

 

After A School a sailor will either go directly to their assignment or they will go to a C School.  A C School addresses a specific specialty.  A particular aircraft type, ship type or system depending.  DC (Damage Controlman) is a Rate as is HT (Hull Technician).  Both utilize welding as a skill, but with different emphasis. 

 

And then there are a laundry list of specialized training schools.  Shipboard Firefighting and Aircraft Firefighting are two specialized schools that concentrate on, well firefighting. 

 

I don’t see your templates as being for someone out of boot, but rather someone that has spent a few years in. 

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