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Degrees of Success (or Failure)


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So, in both 5th Edition and 6th Edition the statements are the same.

 

"When the GM asks you to make a Characteristic Roll (such as a DEX Roll to walk along a narrow beam), you roll 3d6 like normal. Th e more you make (or fail) the roll by, the greater your degree of success (or failure)."

 

"If the character rolls less than or equal to his Skill Roll, taking all modifiers into account, he has succeeded. The more he makes the roll by, the greater his degree of success."

 

Just how do you apply the concept of Degree of Success or Degree of Failure

What kinds of degrees do you use, as in how do you define a single degree or more? 

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I just accidentally erased a more elaborate post.

 

Sometimes a narrative difference between describing how you barely make a Climb or do it easily.

 

Sometimes tangible. Gambling well means winning more money (and/or doing it more impressively if your intent is to impress). Combat driving is the difference between an unblemished car or a car full of so many dings and bullet holes so that you couldn't drive the car around town or put it into a regular body shop without attracting police attention.

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To give a concrete example....player has Analyze (Magic);  the GM allows the skill to apply to magical items.  The campaign rules might have differing levels of info depending on the degree of success:

 

--enhanced damage:  don't roll an 18

--elemental damage (or 'bane' damage...against a race or type of critter):  very easy (miss by 2 or less)

--fire damage (or dragonslayer):  make the roll

--how much?:  GM might consider this more subtle, so make by 2

--Ohhhh it does THAT????  (an undead bane weapon actually has Affects Desolid Undead, but it doesn't impact the damage):  make by 5

 

It's also plausible that there's, say, 3 clues.  Miss by 2, get 1;  make, get 2;  make by 2, get all 3.  

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14 minutes ago, unclevlad said:

To give a concrete example....player has Analyze (Magic);  the GM allows the skill to apply to magical items.  The campaign rules might have differing levels of info depending on the degree of success:

 

--enhanced damage:  don't roll an 18

--elemental damage (or 'bane' damage...against a race or type of critter):  very easy (miss by 2 or less)

--fire damage (or dragonslayer):  make the roll

--how much?:  GM might consider this more subtle, so make by 2

--Ohhhh it does THAT????  (an undead bane weapon actually has Affects Desolid Undead, but it doesn't impact the damage):  make by 5

 

It's also plausible that there's, say, 3 clues.  Miss by 2, get 1;  make, get 2;  make by 2, get all 3.  

 

That's why you spend a lot of extra time on your Analyze roll....

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It depends on what the roll is for.  

 

If it is an opposed roll then the better the roll the harder it is for the opposing roll to succeed.  So for an opposed roll this is already kind of built in and not a lot more needs to be done.

 

In combat using the critical hit rules pretty well takes care of it. Add in some fumbles on a bad roll to cover the opposite spectrum.

 

For some rolls the results are binary by the nature of the task.  When you are trying to disarm a bomb with demolitions you either succeed or fail.  Sure you could say that if you make it by more you do it quicker, but on that skill you are usually taking extra time if you can.  These type of tasks any degree of success is pretty much cosmetic. 

 

For tasks involving information like perception or knowledge skills the more you make the roll the more information you get.  Making your perception roll exactly will give you the basic information.  With a better roll you gain more details.  So if you make the perception roll exactly you notice someone is sneaking up on you.  If you make it by more you get more details.  
 

Task falling outside these categories are handled depending on the circumstance.   

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I have also used degree of success to determine how long a task takes for skills that have a more nebulous time frame.  So for character using a Mechanic skill to repair a vehicle or a scholar doing research with a KS, or a gadgeteer using Electronics and some SS to invent a new gizmo, the more they make their roll by the faster they complete the task.  That said, I have also set the time it takes to complete such tasks with an eye toward pacing the plot or for dramatic purpose, so it depends on the situation.

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