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Category talk:Fictional mad scientists

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Question: Why is it necessary to include fictional in front of mad scientists? Is there a list of real ones? And if so, how do I put myself on it?

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45 minutes ago, Cancer said:

 

Question: Why is it necessary to include fictional in front of mad scientists? Is there a list of real ones? And if so, how do I put myself on it?

 

Don't worry, I'm sure you're already on several lists by now.

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About six inches of snow on the ground in my end of Seattle, still lightly snowing off and on.  And my bird feeder is insanely busy.  The varied thrush showed up today for the first time this winter.  All the other regulars in higher-than-usual numbers., from flickers and jays down to chickadees, bushtits and wrens.

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The funniest thing about this is the reaction of the 18-month-old cat.  We had no heavy snow last winter, and she was too small to be introduced to it anyway, so she'd never seen snow before.  Last summer we started letting her out in the yard.  When I opened the door for her (and the older cats, neither of whom wanted out in it, but they had seen it before) this afternoon, her reaction to six inches of snow on the deck was something like shocked, horrified fascination, not daring to step out into it, craning her neck to see as much of the disfigured landscape as she could.

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We've got snow sticking to the roads for the first time this season.

 

In other news, the latest water report shows that the area's snowpack this winter is 62% of average, and last month was the 7th driest January on record for the state.

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Still some six inches of snow on the roads, so between that and the pandemic restrictions Valentine's dinner will be here at home, and I'll make chicken pie.  I did get to a store this morning and bought a cake.  We have wine in the house.

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5 hours ago, Cancer said:

 

How about the law of non contradiction which Stanford's online encyclopedia defines as: "

It is impossible that the same thing can at the same time both belong and not belong to the same object and in the same respect, and all other specifications that might be made, let them be added to meet local objections (1005b19–23).

ps: I'm genuinely curious. And thanks for the link, never heard of that before. I can see its applicability with a set of 1, however am also curious to your response to LNC. 

 

 

4 hours ago, Pariah said:

 

This works just fine if (not x) = 0.

 

/literal

/pedantic 


THat's just it, as we are talking about existing things. Can an existing thing essentially be its opposite? 

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Well, I'd heard of Russell's paradox, but I've never worked with it; I have no training in working with formal logic, mathematical or otherwise.  It interacts with Gödel's incompleteness theorems in possibly relevant ways.  What a Real Mathematician would say in response ... I have no idea what they'd say.

 

The non-contradiction law seems like an axiom to me, but the others are theorems, and Godel's work indicates that a set of axioms from which theorems are constructed must be either incomplete (i.e., there exist true things which cannot be proven) or inconsistent (i.e., there exist false things that nevertheless be proven true).  (I assume it is possible for both to hold.)

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