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Can everybody share some things they do to speed up the combats in their champs games? My last game went roughly half the pace I wanted, so I am doing a few things to speed it up for the next game.

 

I made a GM screen with all the charts I keep looking up.

I put the stats of my most used villians right on the screen.

I put a picture of Trogdor on the other side of the screen to scare the players!

 

I also made up sheets with pre-rolled dice results. Each sheet has 30 results (Stun + body) for 5d6 through 14d6. I didn't bother with 4d6 because the only common 4d6 effect in my campaign is the speedsters area effect, selective on his str, which is quick to roll anyway. And I didn't want pre-rolled hit rolls, as that would certainly effect the players moves too much.

 

I will be going back to using that speed chart application on a laptop again. Anyone have a link to that? My main laptop died a horrid death and I don't have that proggy on my decrepit old ones.

 

Any other suggestions?

 

How about stuff on the player's side of things?

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Can everybody share some things they do to speed up the combats in their champs games? My last game went roughly half the pace I wanted' date=' so I am doing a few things to speed it up for the next game.[/quote']

 

When I wanted a fast combat I told the players that I wasn't going to roll damage but instead have three hits. If I was between 1 above required to hit to two below it then the villain would do a glancing blow - dice*2, anything between three and five below the to hit would be a solid hit dice*4 and anything else til a three would be dice*5.

 

Saved a lot of time....

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Re: Speeding things up

 

The general rule we played with was that the amount of Body inflicted would always be equal to the number of dice rolled, unless the player particularly wanted to count them. It would really speed things up when 10-15 dice were being rolled each time.

 

What do you think of distribution charts though?

 

You could list a roll of 1-10 on the top going across, and the number of dice rolled on the left going down. Then each one of the entries on the table would have the amount of damage dealt. It means that all damage could be boiled down to one d10 roll. The numbers 5 and 6 would be average damage, with less damage (as per the correct bell curve for the number of dice) with a lower roll and higher damage for a correspondingly higher roll on the d10.

 

If the Body counting is standardised like I mentioned above, this would probably really speed things up.

 

 

 

The Horror

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Hmm... good question.

 

1) I use a home-brewed speedchart app that I wrote to run the speed chart. Usually helps, at least a bit.

 

2) Knowing the villains/NPCs always helps (preparation)... when I am using complicated published characters, it sometimes takes a little longer to figure out what the villain is going to do.

 

3) Make sure your players know their characters. Sometimes complex characters are a problem!

 

4) Keep defenses low when compared to attacks... the higher the defenses (especially when Damage Reduction is in play), the longer the battles. Of course, players hate it when you try and lower their defenses... ;)

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Here are things that I find speed things up without doing anything to modify the way the game is played (such as replacing dice rolls with pre-rolled results):

  • Have the GM prepare a Combat Record Sheet which shows all the possible characters in a combat or combats in DEX order and which phases they act in. With this, the GM can simply call out who's up (and possibly, who's up next so they can start thinking). If you simply call out phases and DEXes, you'll be there forever.
  • Declare levels and maneuvers but don't calculate OCV, then roll to hit. A lot of times, it is obvious whether the roll hits or not. If it is not obvious, then work it out.
  • When counting pips on the dice, group the dice in groups of 10.
  • When counting BODY, simply count the number of 6's and the number of 1's: BODY=number of dice rollled + number of 6's - number of 1's.
  • If counting dice takes too long, perhaps you should get some simple Arithmetic flash cards and spend a few hours on improving your group's addition skills :)

Rod

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Re: Speeding things up

 

[*]Have the GM prepare a Combat Record Sheet which shows all the possible characters in a combat or combats in DEX order and which phases they act in. With this' date=' the GM can simply call out who's up (and possibly, who's up next so they can start thinking). If you simply call out phases and DEXes, you'll be there forever.[/quote']

 

Corollary: NEVER allow DEX or SPD affecting adjustment powers, as these throw the chart off something fierce. [Yes, it takes out some legit power constructs, but if speeding up combat is the goal, this helps considerably.]

 

[*]Declare levels and maneuvers but don't calculate OCV' date=' then roll to hit. A lot of times, it is obvious whether the roll hits or not. If it is not obvious, then work it out.[/quote']

 

If you trust ypour players, let them make rolls (activation, to hit, etc.) in advance of their phase and announce the result when the phase comes up. They can even roll, and add, damage in advance in case they hit.

 

[*]If counting dice takes too long, perhaps you should get some simple Arithmetic flash cards and spend a few hours on improving your group's addition skills :)

Rod

 

You could also go to standard effect, or perhaps standard effect for all but, say, 3d6. Instead of rolling 15d6, count the BOD and STUN, you would roll 3d6, and add the STUN to 36 (3 per die) or 42 (average 3.5 per die) and the BOD to 12.

 

Another suggestion: ensure PD and ED are in multiples of 10, which is easy to subtract.

 

I don't worry too much about speed of combat myself, and I do call out segments and phases. But I also keep my villains sorted in order of DEX so I can page through them. If they fall below -20, I pull tem out of the stack to remind myself I no longer need to look at them.

 

Putting them in plastic protectors so you can make notes (STUN used, END used, BOD or other stats down, Stunned, Flashed to phase x, Entangle's BOD and DEF, etc.) can also make it easier to track things, especially if you design the character sheet to have "white space" for these notes.

 

Oh yes - and the three second rule. If you can't announce your action within 3 seconds of being called upon, you are reserving until you make up your mind and the game goes on. [This cuts both ways - the GM doesn't measure out hexes to each target, consider 15 different half move and attack combinations and then finally move the villain.]

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Have the GM prepare a Combat Record Sheet which shows all the possible characters in a combat or combats in DEX order and which phases they act in. With this' date=' the GM can simply call out who's up (and possibly, who's up next so they can start thinking). If you simply call out phases and DEXes, you'll be there forever.[/quote']

I give that chart to the players. They can track their own characters, thankyouverymuch. I've got enough going on with the villains.

 

For each Segment in the Turn, I list the characters who act that Phase in their DEX order. One line each, with OCV, DCV, ECV, and favored attack. They can follow along and be ready when called on. Usually one of the players takes charge and keeps things moving on their side.

 

 

Always use Standard Effect for all Adjustment Powers. Write down what that standard effect is as a note for each power (e.g., 3d6 DEX Drain - note: -3 to DEX).

 

I also forbid any character with a VPP to use a power that hasn't been written down beforehand -- even if their VPP can be changed in combat, or on a whim. Slows things down too much.

 

Finally, some players just aren't good with characters that have 1,000 combat options. I try to steer them toward simpler character archetypes (e.g., bricks). This is particularly helpful with new players.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Relative SPD helps greatly to keep combat moving. As a general rule. I try to make sure that everyone has SPDs 4 and 5 with 3 being "Brick" slow and 6 being "Speedster" fast. This keeps everyone involved and each person gets roughly the same amount of time. This is sort of a bastardization of the optional combat turn style that allows for some diversity. The optional combat turn thingee is a lot quicker and more simple as well. If you like, when I get home I'll check my book for the page number. It's probably in Fifth, but the last place I read it was in Sidekick.

 

As a GM, the best thing you can do to SPD up combat is to expedite your own actions. That way, you don't have to restrict your players and you probably don't mind too much if Grond gets shorted a little, plus you control the more combatants than anyone else. Skip recoveries, fudge close rolls so your villains get hit more when combat starts to drag on, agents can go down after one hit (usually do anyway), cheat in the players favor and combat becomes more enjoyable for them and quicker. In all things moderation and be sneaky, if they know you're cheating for them it ruins the mood.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

It's easy for Champs combat to run on forever, though that's really more of a problem with most rpg's than Champs, itself. The real key, I think, is simply to keep the ball rolling. Here are a number of things I do and/or have seen other gm's do:

 

1) Don't stop. If a player wants to roll and count 20 dice, that's fine. Unless that roll has the potential to end the combat or drastically affect what happens next, go on to whatever character is going to act next and pick up the numbers when they're finally available.

 

2) Pre-rolled numbers are perfectly fine. So are programmable calculators that can get the results of hideously large die rolls quickly. I'm quite thankful that one of my players brings one of these to every session.

 

3) Have your NPC's come into play with a game plan, including contingencies for a variety of situations. It doesn't matter if the NPC's, themselves, know the game plan or not, so long as *you* keep it firmly in mind so that you don't have to stop and think too long about what they're doing next.

 

4) Get logistical details out of the way in advance. Prepare your battle maps, get your minis together and be ready to rock and roll. A great time to do this is either before the game begins or while people are getting something to drink/lining up for the rest room.

 

5) Take care of the real world first. Announce that a combat is about to happen and that anyone with something to take care of -- bathroom break, smoke break, refill on a drink, pizza order, whatever -- should do so immediately.

 

6) Expedite at all opportunities. When you see the writing on the wall -- i.e. the bad guys are going to eventually be beaten down and there's nothing that will stop it -- offer to concede the ending to the combat. If Muscle Man's been winding up for his huge hammer-hand-strike for ten minutes, let him have at it, if he wants, but if the gradual wearing down of a villain who can't stop it isn't boring, then let's go watch some paint dry.

 

7) Don't let players lolligag. If a player doesn't have enough time after one action to figure out what the next one is, remind him that the character in question has about a 10th of a second to make the decision, then demand one. If the player needs more time to think, then so does the character, so let him hold his action while he cogitates.

 

8) Crush all who oppose you! (Good advice for any situation. :) )

 

-- Mike

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Another suggestion to speed up combat is to adjust the campaign Active Point/DC limits. My players like quick combats (usually 1-2 turns, max), so we've kept the defenses of all characters lower than recommended for the power level we're running at.

 

For established campaigns, you can just raise the maximum allowable DC of attacks. Players will quickly inflate their stats to match, and combats will be much shorter as more damage will get through on each attack.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

#> Use miniatures and a tape measure instead of hexes. This speeds things up dramatically on its own -- except for "turn mode" for movement powers. I've yet to come up with a satisfactory solution for that one that doesn't involve woodworking skills ;)

 

#> Consider pre-roll sheets and/or a dice-rolling program. We tried this for a couple of sessions and it speeds things up -- but the players decided that rolling the dice was part of the fun and that it didn't "feel right", so we went back to rolling. It *does* speed things up noticeably.

 

#> Instead of using STUN totals for henchman/shrubs, use "hits" -- where a good result from a moderate attack or a moderate result from a normal attack takes them out in one or two shots.

 

#> Prepare a list of "standard END" costs and list it on the battlesheet. For example I list 3 standard costs: keeping all constant powers running while making a half-move and making a standard attack; standing still with all constant powers running and attacking; and a "special" circumstance for that character (such as Tunneling instead of Flying).

 

#> Sometimes you have to put your foot down. If you have a player like one certain guy in our D&D group, break out an egg-timer and enforce it.

 

#> Disallow the optional manuevers that alter DEX for the purposes of going first. These are *NOT* worth the trouble they invoke in my opinion.

 

#> I cannot emphasize strongly enough the importance of preparing a good combat sheet before the session begins. I hate to sound rude but if you don't do this you should reconsider being a GM

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Re: Speeding things up

 

My favorite technique for speeding up combat is NO FIGURES and NO MAPS (aside from a quick sketch, maybe, to explain a complicated situation). Describe the situation, let the players respond to it without getting bogged down in exact hex counts and ranges. I'm more concerned with speedy play and simulating a comic book battle than wargaming the exact results of the rules.

 

"Am I close enough to punch the Man-Bear?"

"Close enough for a half-move and attack, sure."

"Okay, I'll do that."

 

"I throw a flame blast at Patty Neutron (one of the Neutron Sisters)."

"She's pretty far away, you'll have a minus to hit."

"Okay, I'll spread my blast by 4d6."

 

"Is there something big and heavy I can throw at Mr. Fusion?"

"Sure. A big mailbox is a couple of steps to your right."

 

Yeah, occasionally you have to stop and sort out who's where, when the players' mental picture of the battlefield diverges too much from the GM's. But even so, the time saved by not moving figures and calculating exact distances (and the minimaxing wargaming mentality that tends to go along with such things) is worth it.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

For established campaigns' date=' you can just raise the maximum allowable DC of attacks. Players will quickly inflate their stats to match, and combats will be much shorter as more damage will get through on each attack.[/quote']

 

For a less visible approach, raise all opposition DC's by 3 and lower their defenses by 10 each. They'll average 10.5 more STUN per hit inflicted, and take 10 more STUN per hit they receive.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Eyendasky80 and Lightray use some of the same techniques I do:

 

Keep SPD levels lower than the CU (most heroes have SPD 4 in my game).

 

Keep defenses lower. I'm particularly restrictive on Damage Reduction.

 

Use fewer opponents.

 

Once an enemy goes down, he stays down (possible exception for the biggest bad guys). This also keeps the PCs from having to waste actions non-heroically pounding on unconscious foes.

 

Use abbreviated sheets for the enemies. I can sometimes fit 6-10 enemies on one side of a page. That keeps me from having to flip pages looking for the right enemy.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

#> Consider pre-roll sheets and/or a dice-rolling program. We tried this for a couple of sessions and it speeds things up -- but the players decided that rolling the dice was part of the fun and that it didn't "feel right", so we went back to rolling. It *does* speed things up noticeably.

I'd suggest using the pre-roll sheets or dice-rolling program for your own stuff, and let the players roll theirs. Typically, the GM is running as many characters, or more, than the players combined, so this cuts time in half and still lets the players enjoy the dice rolls. At the very least, pre-roll for the mooks and throwaway villains.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Btw guys. I've started drafting up the table of results I mentioned. I know you guys won't need it, but it may help some people here and there if they are really sick of adding up 10-20 dice every time.

 

I'll post it up here and at RPGnet (where most of the complaints about speed of play in HEROcome up) when it's done. Should be tonight or the next night.

 

 

The Horror

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Re: Speeding things up

 

My favorite technique for speeding up combat is NO FIGURES and NO MAPS (aside from a quick sketch, maybe, to explain a complicated situation). Describe the situation, let the players respond to it without getting bogged down in exact hex counts and ranges. I'm more concerned with speedy play and simulating a comic book battle than wargaming the exact results of the rules.

 

[snip]

 

Yeah, occasionally you have to stop and sort out who's where, when the players' mental picture of the battlefield diverges too much from the GM's. But even so, the time saved by not moving figures and calculating exact distances (and the minimaxing wargaming mentality that tends to go along with such things) is worth it.

 

I always draw maps, because I'm a visual person. Some people are; they can't easily visualize something, or miss key details (since we game at a friend's house and they have kids, the noise level sometimes gets out of hand). I make them in advance and often fairly detailed, and I've found it helps the players get into things and come up with some interesting tactics.

 

I agree with the non-wargaming mentality. But you can just skip hex-counting altogether (maybe don't even use hexmaps, just plain paper) and move the characters and judge ranges by eye.

 

At GenCon, I was in a game where the GM didn't draw anything, and he sucked at describing things. When we were getting our butts kicked in the big battle and finally convinced him to sketch out the layout, we saw things he failed to mention, and managed to work together (instead of acting almost randomly) to win.

 

Of course, different strokes. What works for me may not work for you.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

I always draw maps' date=' because I'm a visual person. Some people are; they can't easily visualize something, or miss key details (since we game at a friend's house and they have kids, the noise level sometimes gets out of hand). I make them in advance and often fairly detailed, and I've found it helps the players get into things and come up with some interesting tactics.[/quote']

 

There's nothing wrong with using maps, but I switched to a more freeform no-map-use style after we had been playing map-heavy for a while. The results made a believer out of me; my players tend to be wargamers as it is, taking away the props and the temptation to minimax helped speed up my game immensely.

 

At GenCon, I was in a game where the GM didn't draw anything, and he sucked at describing things. When we were getting our butts kicked in the big battle and finally convinced him to sketch out the layout, we saw things he failed to mention, and managed to work together (instead of acting almost randomly) to win.

 

Well...yeah. If the GM sucks as describing the situation, using maps can help a lot.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

I have had combats that have been very drawn out in the past and I am sure I shall in the future also. Nature of the beast overall, but I have done considerable time saving on my combats. And here are the methods I use.

 

1. Make up good combat charts. I use hero designer and several different templates of the Combat Records to have a Standard chart, offensive chart, defensive chart, movement chart, and disadvantages chart. I run Firefox on my laptop during the games and have the charts loaded in under different tabs.

 

2. Get a good dice rolling program you like. I went through several and am still open for a better one although I useRPG Dice 2.0 for my villains but not my players. Also do have a set of prerolled 3d6's for those misc skill rolls for the villains. I also have about 10 prerolled skill rolls from each of the players that I use for those perception rolls and such.

 

4. A combat sequencer program can help also.

 

5. Limit the time people get to act. I usually don't bring out the little minute glass timer but there are always times that people just fart around some times. At those times the little timer comes out.

 

6. While using a dice rolling program for all rolls does speed up combat it does diminish my players feelings of involvement in the game so I will not recommend that.

 

 

These steps have helped speed combat up quite a bit and make it move along well. Also I also usually go along with the general mook hit rule. A mook is generally knocked out from any decent hit from my players, although this does not apply to the supervillains.

 

 

Hope those help out.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

I forgot who, but somebody else suggested this long ago:

 

Require each player to make a quick, short soliloquy before each action. If they don't say something, they don't do anything. This gets around setting a time limit on the player, and it motivates the players to think beforehand about what they're going to say and do when they're "on camera." I haven't actually done this, but I've heard it speeds up player actions, and adds to the fun besides.

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Guest Champsguy

Re: Speeding things up

 

First, take down the picture of Trogdor. This'll just encourage your players to start saying

 

"Trogdor! Trogdor!

Burninating 'de countryside..."

 

"Bob? Bob, it's your phase. Bob..."

 

"Burninating 'de peasants...

Trogdor!!!"

 

"BOB!!!"

 

"Huh?"

 

Second, as has already been mentioned, count pips by groups of 10. Put 5s wth 5s, 4s with 6s, etc. That'll cut down on people trying to add 6+4+3+5+6+4+2+1+1+3+3+4. I've seen players stare at 37+5 like it's the hardest freakin' math puzzle in the universe.

 

Draw out a quick sketch for a map, unless it's some important place (or you just want to have a cool map). Put down some markers for people if you wish. Don't worry about counting hexes. "This room is about 40 hexes across. He's about in the middle of the room." Don't count hexes too much. If Bob is 1" outside of his half move, let him make it. Likewise, don't let players count hexes too much. They shouldn't be staying at 17" just because they have enough range levels. If you can get away with it, don't even bother with maps. Just point around the room you're sitting in. "Okay, this room is about 40 hexes across. He's over by the TV. You guys come in by the fish tank. There's a large computer panel where my dirty underwear are sitting."

 

Make players think fast. Don't give a newbie more options than his brain can handle. Likewise, don't give an experienced player who is prone to dicking around more options than he needs. "I'm going to form a force wall over the innocent bystanders, and calmly tell them that they need not worry." "...Dude, it's frikkin' Bulldozer. You could have just knocked him out with one punch."

 

Help players think fast. If you have the options of writing up the characters, avoid giving guys too many combat levels. Pure Dex is faster. Even I have trouble sometimes when 2 martial artists who each have 6 combat levels start fighting each other and moving levels around (plus their martial bonuses). Disallow levels that don't apply to both ranged and hand to hand attacks.

 

Stay away from adjustment powers in general. While cool, they don't operate as fast as big ass energy blasts do. They're too expensive for enough dice of effect.

 

Be nice with handing out dice for attacks. When the player flies over, grabs up a car, and does a pushed move-through on the bad guy, give him an extra 2 or 3 dice for carrying the car. Yes, it means the bad guy will probably be unconscious, but the fight will go so much faster.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Any other suggestions?

 

How about stuff on the player's side of things?

Make the players be prepared when it's their turn. If they hem and haw around it, tell them they need to lower their SPEED by one and spend the points elsewhere. (Drastic effect)

 

For minor villains and "normals," don't allow them to RECOVER. Just get it over with. I tend not to worry about NPC ENDURANCE with NPC groups of four or more.

 

If an NPC has just a few stun left after a hit, knock 'em out.

 

Use an area effect attack against all your heroes, if the scene design is for the villain to win or get away. (Don't be afraid for your villain to flee.)

 

In the longest running group I played in, we stopped using miniatures and kept the images in our heads. (Besides, D&D minatures looked kind of strange for supers.)

 

Cut down on the number of NPCs in a battle. I had a real bad habit of creating large battles (the PC team + an NPC team, ambushed at base by a VIPER nest, kind of thing). If you run another NPC hero team with your PCs, let the players run a similar NPC hero also. The GM has lots to keep track of, it might be fun for the players to play NPC heroes also. My previous GMs used to always hand me an extra NPC hero first when there was a large fight, because I would almost always prepare their attacks ahead of time. I was also the first to run TWO NPCs + my PC because I liked to help out.

 

NPC hero vs NPC villain situation? You decide. I would sometimes play these battles out ahead of the game to determine who would win, and just insert the battle in the game by describing basics.

 

I hope these help.

 

What do your combats normally consist of? That might help us concentrate on your specific problem(s) as opposed to some in general.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

I don't see how lowering PC speeds changes anything. All it does is give normals and agents more phases relative to the PCs and that can't do much to speed things up...

 

The best advice I can give is: Don't let slow players play complicated characters.

 

$0.02

 

No, no, I said keep SPD relative. I tell my players they can have between 3 and 6 but if they pick 6 they have to have some form of super SPD/reflexes or such in their conception to justify it. 3s are usually heavy hitters and I encourage them to bump it up to 4 unless their concept is slow and strong.

 

What I find this does, is keep everyone involved and the momentum moving forward. If you have a super speedster with a SPD of 9 than the brick with a 4 is going to get sleepy while this guy runs around in circles. I just like everyone to have equal turns so no one wonders off. If we need a break, we all take a break together. Before I did this, slow characters would go to the bathroom, grab a drink, whatever and it amazed me how these guys could have twenty to thirty minutes to plan their next action and still say "huh?" when I call thier name. So I basically adopted a turn based combat system that still uses the SPD chart and has a little room for variation. I swear it sped up combat at least %100. It made it more fun, too. My group may have been a little extreme, though, that example I gave above was true. Except the speedster was SPD 10 and he wasn't a speedster, he was a ripoff of Ash from Evil Dead. After that, I decided to come up with some strict rules for SPD because min/maxing SPD is a gamebreaker.

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Re: Speeding things up

 

Ok, I don't want to actually change any rules. But I have considered an alternate speed chart, one in which speed 1 goes in segment 12, speed 2, segments 11 and 12, speed 3 10-12, speed 4, 9-12, speed 5, 8-12, speed 6, 7-12 and so on. It might be a just mildly unfair towards the slower characters, but it would still speed things up a bunch. In fact I think I might try this alteternate chart next game and see how well it works.

 

Another consideration is considering all actions in a segment simultaneous, regardless of dex. Of course sometimes that can break.

 

I think I might also try to work up even more pre-rolled stuff for the bad guys. Like for major villians having a nice chart with pre rolled hit and effect rolls for all their powers. Like "Ok, Jennifer Lopez runs towards Time Bomb and swings her lazer sword", it looks like she hit for 9 body and 23 stun, be sure and subtract your resistant defense from that".

 

Skill levels, stun, body, end.

 

I have noticed in my game we don't have a good enough way to keep track of these items. I am changing that next game, where everyone will get a sheet with a column for each of these items, and one for anything they have with charges, and a skill level isn't shifted from OCV to DCV to whatever unless they change it on that sheet.

 

Also, it would be great if I could train my players to call out what DCV they hit. Way too often it is "Ok, I am doing using my Trogdor Punch* on Jennifer Lopez, Ben Affleck, and Grond, I got a 10, did I hit?" I of course then have to figure out the player's OCV and then figure out what they would have hit to see that they decked Jennifer Lopez and missed Ben Affleck and Grond entirely.

 

For that matter it would be great if my players sat in order of DEX!

 

 

*TROGDOR PUNCH EVERYONE!! (Speedster power): Area effect radius on str. Selective, double radius.

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