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CubeSats going interplanetary

 

That is labeled "Full Access", so I think that should not be locked behind the subscriber wall, but I have been deceived about that before.

 

CubeSats (that's a Wikipedia link) are small spacecraft intended to be cheap and relatively easy to make.  Originally single cubes 10 cm on each edge, later versions include spacecraft made of several cubes.  The point is that you can launch lots of them all at once for cheap, often as hitchhikers on some other launch.  Bunches of them have been sent into Earth orbit.  It was originally intended that there was no engine aboard them: they just went into whatever orbit they happened to land in; there's useful things that can be done (both science, and engineering testing) with that sort situation.  And it is cheap.

 

There are several now going on interplanetary missions, and the concept of sending many tiny, inexpensive interplanetary missions is very interesting for planetary science.

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2 hours ago, Cancer said:

CubeSats going interplanetary

 

That is labeled "Full Access", so I think that should not be locked behind the subscriber wall, but I have been deceived about that before.

 

CubeSats (that's a Wikipedia link) are small spacecraft intended to be cheap and relatively easy to make.  Originally single cubes 10 cm on each edge, later versions include spacecraft made of several cubes.  The point is that you can launch lots of them all at once for cheap, often as hitchhikers on some other launch.  Bunches of them have been sent into Earth orbit.  It was originally intended that there was no engine aboard them: they just went into whatever orbit they happened to land in; there's useful things that can be done (both science, and engineering testing) with that sort situation.  And it is cheap.

 

There are several now going on interplanetary missions, and the concept of sending many tiny, inexpensive interplanetary missions is very interesting for planetary science.

 

I understand the usefulness of the darned things but I just cringe at the idea of putting even more things which are too small to be detected/avoided into Earth orbit.

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On ‎8‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 7:43 AM, L. Marcus said:

Using a planet as a space ship? That's metal.

See also: Fritz Leiber, The Wanderer; E.E. Smith, Lensman series; and Olaf Stapledon, who probably started the idea (and about half of SF as a whole), Star Maker.

 

Especially Stapledon. Later writers built entire careers around ideas he tossed off in a paragraph.

 

Dean Shomshak

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In the August 1 Astrophysical Journal Letters: They have detected carbon monoxide, water vapor, and hydrogen cyanide in the atmosphere of the "hot Jupiter" planet HD 209458b.  That planet is not Earthlike (it's between Saturn and Jupiter in terms of mass, but it is in a 3.5 day orbit around its star) but seeing that stuff in the atmosphere, especially HCN, gives you more of a handle on what the chemistry in such an atmosphere might be like.  "They" here are four authors, G A Hawker, N Madhusudhan, S H C Cabot, and S Gandhi.

 

Another one, which I can only link (it says "open access") because the concept would never have occurred to me:

 

 The Search for Extra-Galactic Intelligence Signals Synchronized with Binary Neutron Star Mergers

 

*If* you can predict accurately when and where a binary neutron star event is going to occur, *then* you could send a signal appropriately synchronized with the neutrino etc. signal of the subsequent merger event so that a civilization in another galaxy could detect your signal and know you were there.

 

I note without further comment that it is likely that any species that actually detects your signal will not have evolved to sapience yet at the time you send your signal,  and who knows what will have happened to your own species in that interval of time anyway, but ....

 

EDIT: The neutron star merger event that was detected last year was in NGC 4993, which is about 145 million light-years away.  I note that at this time, Order Primates is believed to be only about half of 145 million years old.  So it goes deeper than just "species" ....

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