Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

CourtFool

Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

Recommended Posts

Pirate Heroes Online, arrrrrg!

 

Seafarers are notoriously superstitious. Just because there is no magic in my campaign does not mean people do not believe in magic.

 

I say 'cursed' simply as a plot device or GM fiat. Whatever bad things I want to happen to the ship, do. When the PCs earn another ship I will not hit them with so much bad luck. Neither of the characters paid points for a ship or followers. I figure that gives me free reign to make the ships whatever I want and the crew as unruly as I find amusing. Do not get me wrong. I am not out to stick it to my players. I am just trying to make it interesting and taking some creative liscence.

 

I would seriously consider taking this campaign online if I had the time and there were enough interest. If my current group were to disband I would consider runing this online.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

I was looking at FH last night, and I thought the following package deals would be appropriate for a nonmagical pirate campaign:

 

Mariner: Self-explanatory

 

Merchant: The main target of the pirates. Sea trade is at its apex.

 

Crusading Priest: A missionary. Just remove all magic and (probably) weapon skills.

 

Light Fighter: These could be marines.

 

Archer: Just replace bows with flintlocks.

 

Martial Artist: Extremely rare. However, you can have a sailor who is adept at boxing, wrestling, or savate.

 

Commander: This could be an officer of the Queen's Navy or the Royal Marines. Or he can be an exceptional captain of a merchant ship.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

Martial Artist: Extremely rare. However' date=' you can have a sailor who is adept at boxing, wrestling, or savate.[/quote']

 

Great catches but I would disagree that Martial Artist should be extremely rare. Fencing itself gives you the English School, the French School, the Italian School and the Spanish School.

 

There is also Sevillian Knifefighting which, according to the UMA, was invented in the 1600s.

 

And certainly a bawdy tavern or a boarding action is a perfect place for Dirty Infighting/Fisticuffs/Cinematic Brawling.

 

Maybe it is just my style of play which leans towards cinematic and away from realistic, but I have never had a problem with allowing a street thug to buy a couple maneuvers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero, arrrrrg!

 

Seafarers are notoriously superstitious. Just because there is no magic in my campaign does not mean people do not believe in magic.
Beat me to my next suggestion! Arrrrr!

 

Okay, here it is: the pirates come across a lone small merchant ship well away from the normal trade routes. Its sails are furled, it is flying no flags, and it appears to be drifting. It does not respond to warning shots or hails. Moving in, no movement is seen, no shots are fired. Curiously, it bears no nameplates, so it cannot be identified.

 

Boarding it, it is found to be abandoned, and in fact, there is no sign of anyone ever being aboard. There are no personal effects, no provisions, no cargo. The ship's boat is missing, but the ship itself appears to be whole, hale, and perfectly seaworthy.

 

The backstory: In 1610, the remaining Moors in Spain were forced to convert to Christianity or be expelled to North Africa. The Moors who were expelled were known as 'Moriscos' and some of them took up piracy against Spanish Christian vessels as their new profession.

 

A group of these Morisco corsairs captured a trio of Spanish ships and decided to sail them to the Caribbean and continue their piratanical activities against the Spanish infidels there. However, they did not realise the difficulty and danger of such a lengthy sea voyage, and the group suffered losses from injury, disease, and malnourishment as a result. It reached the point that they no longer had enough fit, able-bodied crew to man all their vessels efficiently, so they transferred the crew from the smallest vessel to make up the numbers on the others, and abandoned it. However, since they were near to their goal, they did not scuttle it. There plan is to return in one ship to the point of abandonment and hopefully relocate it in a few days once they have landed and established their new base. The exact fate of this expedition, and whether or not they do return to claim their prize, is up to the GM (note that in appearance, language, action, and weaponry - haggard Moors in traditional dress and wielding scimitars - the Morisco will be unlike any other inhabitant of the Caribbean, and maybe worth including for this reason alone).

 

The Reaction: The abandoned, creaky and nameless ship will quickly be regarded as a 'Ghost Ship' by the superstitious crew; an NPC should use the term 'Ghost Ship' even before she is boarded. Her appearance will be unlike any other ship in the region, being from the Mediterranean and not intended for long sea voyages such as she has just survived. Any incident or accident or illness that befalls a crewman while aboard the Ghost Ship will quickly become the fault of the 'spirits' that 'haunt' the ship. [in fact, if the GM decides the biggest issue facing the Morisco was a simple illness, like gastroenteritis or influenza, then anyone who boards the Ghost Ship will come down with the same illness, although anyone who doesn't stays healthy]. Whether they are ultimately able to sail this ship to port, claim salvage and/or convince authority that it is not stolen is up to the GM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Island of the Damned review...kind of

 

Thanks for the hook, Mantis.

 

To illustrate my point about magic allow me to present some highlights of Island of the Damned, an adventure for Skull & Bones. The basic premise is that a pirate captain hires the PCs to help him recover his treasure from an island not on the charts. Fairly simple and straight foward? This much I can use. The captain though...is a monkey. A monkey! Yes, transformed by a bokor. O.k. that is going to need a re-write. Still salvageable. So the monkey hires the PCs and navigates them to this island that only he knows about. How many islands exist that were not mapped in the 1640s? I mean, I do not mind one or two, but I want to keep things fairly true to life. I digress.

 

So the PCs plus one monkey land on Isla de los Maldecidos and trek across the length of it until they find a plantation. Did I forget to mention the roaming monster table? That will just be tossed completely out except I may use the former crew member of the captain's that is stranded on the island. Of course the plantation is nothing more than a dungeon just better squared off at the edges; complete with traps and monsters. Can you hear the sarcasm dripping from my keyboard yet? O.k. so I replace some of the monsters with guard dogs. That seems reasonable enough to me. The magical traps are going to have to go. The worst part? the major encounter is suppose to include the zombified remains of the captain's crew. Oh, and the monkey/captain just wants the magical artifact (whoa, didn't see that one coming) which controls aforementioned zombified remains.

 

This will take some major re-writes. O.k. So the former crew are not zombies. They are scouring the island to find the captain's burried treasure. That could lead to some interesting role playing as the PCs try to figure out who is telling the truth; captain or crew.

 

The adventure is still usable, but it does require some serious overhauls. I thought D20 was really trying to push out of old molds, but, honestly, tell me this is not D&D on boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Island of the Damned review...kind of

 

I thought D20 was really trying to push out of old molds' date=' but, honestly, tell me this is not D&D on boats.[/quote']Okay, its AD&D on boats :P.

 

Reminds me of the adventures I got for Top Secret (published by TSR) many years ago. They were straight ports of D&D adventures, with underground "bases", finding "krugerands" instead of treasure, and fancy guns and gear instead of magical swords and items. These would have been so easy to port to D&D.

 

Here's a suggestion: the boat hits an underwater obstacle near an island and is holed beneath the waterline, and has to be hurriedly beached so it can be repaired. Due to the extent of the damage, a significant amount of timber of a minimum length is required. In the distance, a stand of trees can be seen which look suitable candidates to provide repair material. A party from the crew must set off on a trek to collect and return with the timber needed (the ship's boat is too small to carry enough men and equipment for the task. Or it will meet them there. Or can get the men there, but not back. Or something to make them walk.). At least you can use the map for this :).

 

Add a mad hermit who hates outsiders, and/or some aggressive island fauna, or a bunch of weird voodoo cultists, or whatever, if you want to add spice to the journey. Again, if they are mysterious and sneaky, make creepy wailing noises in the middle of the night, and generally give the impression of being supernatural, then the players may think something 'magical' is happening when it is not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Heroes Online, arrrrrg!

 

Seafarers are notoriously superstitious. Just because there is no magic in my campaign does not mean people do not believe in magic.

 

I say 'cursed' simply as a plot device or GM fiat. Whatever bad things I want to happen to the ship, do. When the PCs earn another ship I will not hit them with so much bad luck. Neither of the characters paid points for a ship or followers. I figure that gives me free reign to make the ships whatever I want and the crew as unruly as I find amusing. Do not get me wrong. I am not out to stick it to my players. I am just trying to make it interesting and taking some creative liscence.

 

I would seriously consider taking this campaign online if I had the time and there were enough interest. If my current group were to disband I would consider runing this online.

 

Egad! I thought you meant it was cursed game mechanically. I absolutely agree with your definition of cursed. Love it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

I've played in a pirate campaign, and one way of freshening things up is to diversify your criminal enterprises. Between a couple of ambitious and inventive players and the somewhat lunatic schemes of our NPC captain, our pirates devoted a fair amount of their time to smuggling, kidnapping, pillaging, espionage, shipbuilding, merchant ventures, hotel management and anti-piracy patrols.

 

Sure, some of those things at the end there may sound legitimate, but we managed to make crimes out of them, anyhow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirates: The Plundering

 

Are you kidding? I picked up two packs last weekend so I would have minature ships. Thanks for the tip' date=' though. I was reading the short stories yesterday for plot hooks.[/quote']

You can also run a few ship-to-ship battles in between rpg sessions and use the results as part of the campaign's continuity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miami Vice to Pirate Hero Arrrrr

 

---Long---

 

I love me some vice. I just finished season one of Miami Vice. When are they going to release season two?

 

Miami Vice Hero was one of the campaigns I offered up to my players for a campaign. Not surprisingly they passed and went with Pirate Hero Arrrrrr. I do not blame them. Not everyone is a Vicie or Vicer. But as I sat watching the flamencos scurrying about while the credits rolled I wondered how I might use the episode in my current campaign.

 

 

The episode was Lombard. I thought I would post some notes on converting a 20th century cop show into a 17th century pirate tale. Synopsis provide by www.miami-vice.org Albert Lombard is aboard his yacht, having a conversation with his son, Sal. It's obvious the two don't get along.

  • O.k., the names will need to be changed but at least they are on a boat. And a father/son disagreement is universal.

Miami vice cops sneak aboard the yacht, neutralize Lombard's henchmen, and make their way on deck, where they serve Lombard with a subpoena to testify in court against a criminal named Labrizzi.

  • I could have the PCs come across a merchant ship where there is an obvious confrontation on the poop deck. I just love saying 'poop'. The PCs strike the Jolly Roger and the ship immediately surrenders. They are really not in the mood for a fight. Besides, 'Lombard' is a notorious pirate in his own right. Surely the PCs will leave his ship unmolested once they discover whom they are dealing with.

After the cops leave, Lombard talks with his friend Charlie, and tells him he has no intention of ratting out Labrizzi.

  • Assuming the PCs do not kill 'Lombard' he makes it a point to inform the Brethren of the Coast (BotC) that the PCs attacked a fellow pirate.

At the OCB, Castillo recognizes that Al Lombard is between a rock and a hard place because of his immunity agreement. If he testifies, he's dead; if he doesn't, he'll go to jail on contempt of court charges. Castillo orders the vice squad to keep Lombard alive.

Someone tells the PCs who 'Lombard' is and that they have made a bad mistake. If they only took him prisoner, they could release him at this point and avoid a lot of grief.

 

Charlie goes to meet Labrizzi in a soda shop [My Boy Lollipop]. Labrizzi feels certain Al will testify, and asks Charlie if he's ready to take over Lombard's action. Charlie nods his agreement.

  • The soda shop will have to be a tavern, The Rock Candy. Again, more name changing…'Labrizzi', a high level member of the BotC finds out what happened to 'Lombard'. He decides this is a perfect time to move in on 'Lombards' action. Maybe a particularly juicy region of the Caribbean.

Later, Lombard has lunch with friends. As he's leaving the restaurant, two hired guns attempt to assassinate him. Lombard is shot, but was wearing a vest, and escapes relatively unharmed.

  • The PCs hear rumors that assassins made an attempt on 'Lombard'. They figure out that there is dissention amongst the BotC.

A warehouse owned by Labrizzi is torched, presumably by Lombard's people. Crockett and Tubbs go to visit one of their snitches, Augie, at the dog track, to try to find out what's going on. Augie doesn't know much, but promises to sniff around.

  • The PCs hear more rumors that 'Labrizzi' was attacked.

Sonny and Rico then pay Lombard a visit, offering to put him under protective custody. Al declines.

 

  • The PCs offer to throw in with 'Lombard' or maybe not. I would need to come up with some kind of hook why they would care at all about an internal war that has very little to do with them. Maybe 'Lombard' showed mercy to one of the PCs at some point.

Lombard's men catch one of Labrizzi's thugs, and Lombard tries to get him to cough up the name of the person who set him up. The man points at Charlie. Even though the man has complied, Lombard concludes the meeting by having him shot. He has other things in mind for Charlie; he orders him to set up Labrizzi.

  • More behind the scenes stuff. 'Lombard' finds out one of his most trusted officers is two timing him. The scurvy dog.

That evening, Lombard receives a call from Charlie. He did set up Labrizzi, but things didn't work out exactly as planned, so Al needs to get out of town for a while. Charlie says he's prepared all the necessary papers for Al, and that the two need to meet.

  • Things are really getting hot in the Caribbean for 'Lombard'. 'Labrizzi' is leaking information to Spanish pirate hunters where 'Lombard' is. 'Lombard' plans to meet up with 'Charlie', the scurvy dog, to dig up some treasure to finance a trip to Europe until things cool down a bit.

Al leaves his yacht to rendezvous with Charlie, with Crockett and Tubbs tailing him [Wire]. It quickly becomes clear, as Al and Charlie face each other, that Charlie intends to kill Al. The two vice cops prevent this from happening by shooting Charlie before he has a chance to shoot Lombard. Now, Lombard is taken into protective custody and transported to an old apartment complex comprised of small, single-residence buildings.

  • The PCs find out the location of an un-named island the two are going to meet at and arrive just in time to see 'Charlie', the scurvy dog, fire on 'Lombards' ship. More assumptions that the PCs help 'Lombard'

Lombard sends Tubbs to get the fixings for a vermicelli dinner and, over the meal, Lombard tells the story of how he got into the criminal life and became estranged from his son. An undercurrent throughout this episode is a strange appreciation, even admiration, which Sonny Crockett develops for Al Lombard. He's a hard guy not to like. There's something about Lombard with which Sonny identifies - perhaps his loyalty, or the honor code, of a sort, that Lombard lives by. It's never completely clear.

  • The PCs prepare to take 'Lombard' to the Ivory Coast where he can pillage and plunder a while until things cool off in the Caribbean.

The next morning, Lombard asks to go for a walk. Crockett and Tubbs escort him into the courtyard. As Lombard is doing a little stretching, a truck pulls up and shooting erupts. As the vice cops are busy trying to stop the truck and the people in it, Lombard slips away.

  • 'Lombard' pleads with the PCs to make one last score before heading off for the Ivory Coast. Afterall, he is going to need a little sumptin' sumptin' to finance his piracy once he gets there. Assuming the PCs agree and attack a ship, 'Lombard' manages to take over one of the ships and sail off.

Al goes to visit Sal, who berates him for never having been there for him when he was a kid. Lombard clearly wants to make amends. Sal insists that the only way that can happen is for Lombard to testify. He also wants his dad to stick around and tells Al that he loves him. Lombard agrees to testify and go into the witness protection program.

  • 'Lombard' heads straight to [insert port city here] where his son is.

He spends his last evening before the court appearance on Crockett's boat. He has a talk with Sonny, telling him that he and Crockett are a lot alike. Crockett disagrees because, he says, he has never murdered anyone. Crockett then accuses Al of the murder of a woman named Barbara Carol, but Lombard claims he wasn't the one responsible for her death. Al Lombard does appear in court the next day, with his son waiting proudly to hear his father testify.

  • The PCs should figure out where 'Lombard' went and catch up to him. 'Lombard' refuses to give up piracy in the Caribbean much to the chagrin of his son and the PCs.

When the moment comes, Lombard takes the fifth and refuses. His son angrily leaves the courtroom. Al tells Sonny that he will never rat out his friends, and it's clear that Sonny respects that stance. In the final scene, Lombard leaves the courthouse in his car. Two men in another car immediately begin following him. They are carrying some big guns.

  • A week later the PCs learn that 'Lombard' was captured by the Spanish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

For this adventure, you could make the PCs Privateers, operating under a Letter of Marque. Then they would be like 'cops' and would have reason to react the way you want them to react.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

For this adventure' date=' you could make the PCs Privateers, operating under a Letter of Marque. Then they would be like 'cops' and would have reason to react the way you want them to react.[/quote']Not even that; the "pirate" society in the Caribbeans had laws anyone respected so it's posible that the PCs could be designated (or elected if you prefer) as investigators by their fellow pirate citizens.

Pirates invented the concept of "medicare" after all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

Here's some other ideas.

 

Based on your proposed ideas, the players are going to have some people pissed off at them soon. A friend of one of these people pretending to be a "contact" can let them know about a spanish treasure galleon which is taking a solitary route while the loudly proclaimed "treasure fleet" acts as a decoy. The treasure galleon is really a man o'war trolling for pirates. When /if the players escape they're probably going to want to talk to their informant :) Finding him/her and finding out why they stiffed the players is an adventure in itself. It might lead to more conflict with the rival/enemy (always good to have a defined enemy or two)

 

Take a page from real life. Henry Morgan led a pirate army across the isthmus to attack Panama. Since the players already have a letter of Marque, introduce an annoying noble with a plattoon of Royal Marines turn up and suggest a profitable looting expedition of a Spanish town (with a royal command, of course). While fortified against a sea attack it might be vulnerable to a surprise assault from the landward side. They'd probably need to do a deal with some other pirates, involving a certain amount of diplomacy. It'd give your pirates something different to do - swamps, crocodiles and possibly annoyed Carib.s to start with, then a battle and storming the walls, followed by looting and escape.

 

If you want, they can escape with a map showing the route of the real treasure fleet hidden in among the loot (they can find it later, letting you split this story arc up with another adventure in between) - they'd need to gather a pirate fleet to have any chance of taking it (maybe try sneaking some pirates on board disguised as honorable but lusty seamen before the fleet sails, maybe involving their companions from the town escapade), and even if they do, they'll have their work cut out keeping a share of the spoils after the battle - treachery among pirates and all that.

 

At the end of that, they'll be established pirates with both contacts among the English (and possibly Dutch) and enemies among the Spanish, to provide plot hooks. And if you play it well, one of their erstwhile pirate allies will sail off with most of the loot, leaving them with several chests of stones. They'll need to find him, extract the location of the place where he's buried the loot (he's tattooed one half of the map onto the back of two different slaves...). Even when or if they get it back, they'll need a base and to outfit their own ship, and some way of using their ill-gotten loot (start a merchant business on the side, or a plantation, or etc, etc)

 

cheers, Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

A couple more inerseting tidbits, percolating up from my barely awake brain...

Remember that you have some freedom to play with isolated colonies of critters that are extinct and or never documented in the modern age. Gives you a bit of the "monster" element without breaking credibility. The example that made me think of this was from the book I mentioned in my previous post (The Pirate Hunter). As late as the 17th century, IIRC, there was documentation of a tribe of people with very sensitive and partially prehensile tails. The Catholic Missionaries were scandalized by some of the things the natives did with these tails (use your imagination....) They are now gone, thanks to disease and interbreeding, but back in the day, you got to see a lot more of this kind of thing.

Another idea, less of a "bit" and more of a theme, is again taken from Cpt. Kidd. He set out as a Privateer, who's crew turned pirate when they failed to take any prizes. This is a particularily evil and tense thing to pull on players, but can be a good start for "good guy" pirates... Hunted by the crown for going renegade while at the same time trying to track down your former flagship and retrieve it from the mutineers, while trying to find a way to clear your name or earn a pardon...

Just hope you don't end up the way Kidd did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do you think we talk with these outrageous accents?

 

My group has missed a few sessions so we decided to do some e-mail updates until the next session.

 

The captain and the surgeon are in Martinique taking on supplies. They were asked by the governor to bring back food stuffs because they were recently hit hard by a hurricane.

 

The surgeon decided to honor any diner invites from the governor and spend some time in the local taverns while they are provisioning. I am sending him the following update:

 

You gain the following from your dinners with Lord Beuregard:

 

Lord Beuregard, governor of Martinique, has two daughters, Alice and Laetitia, and one son, Orville. Orville is the oldest being of 13 years of age. Laetitia is 12 and Alice, the girl who had the tumor, is 10.

 

Lord Beuregard felt stifled in Paris. He was a wealthy, land-owning baron. Despite his wealth, or perhaps because of it, he was looked down upon by higher ranking lords. He felt that moving to the Caribbean would get him out from under their disdainful glare.

 

Orville is brimming over with curiosity, especially about sea adventures. He also shows quite an interest in a certain female captain. His father intends him to attend university at Paris. Orville seems resigned to his father's wishes.

 

Lord Beuregard has been having problems with the local Caribs. They will attack the out-laying plantations and then disappear back into the interior jungles. He does not want to risk pulling too many of the local garrison to go chasing after them.

 

Most of the ventures in Martinique were financed by The Compagnie des îles d'Amérique (The Company of the Islands of America).

 

Martinique does not have trained doctor and Beuregard offers to hire you on multiple times.

 

King Charles I (England) is in real financial trouble. There is talk he may recall parliament.

 

England and France are at war with Spain.

 

 

You gain the following from your slumming:

 

The Company of the Islands of America are only concerned with turning a profit.

 

Many ships of questionable repute make dock in Martinique and trade with the port. As long as they do not make trouble, Beuregard turns a blind eye.

 

Who cares if England and France are at war with Spain, we just want some food!

 

The surgeon does have Conversation, High Society and Streetwise so I thought this was reasonable. It is not as detailed as I would like; me being a perfectionist and all. I just want to try to keep things going while I work the cobwebs out of my brain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

You are SO giving me ideas for TravellerHERO! :)

 

One of the best Traveller games I ever ran, all the players wanted to be pirates. My GM PC and the main character had both been pirates, and both mustered out with a pirate cruiser. They sold one of their ships to get the money to up-gun the other one.

 

Then the whole crew went on a pirate rampage, that lasted for about 5 years (game time). They were wildly successful, but got bored.

So they went legit, opened a shipping line, and made more money in 6 months as legit merchants than they had the whole 5 years they were pirates.

 

If I get to run TravellerHERO anytime soon, I WILL be using this material. Good ideas, oh llama!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pirate Traveller Hero arrrrrg!

 

Good ideas' date=' oh llama![/quote']

 

Oh stop! You are making me feel all warm and fuzzy.

 

Curiously, the only reason I am running this campaign is because the GM who was going to run Traveller Hero baled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

Hi,

I agree in a certain way that pirate and generally seamanship adventures tend to be repetitive but if the overall feeling is similar the plot twists can be numerous. And also the situation can be varied enough to keep the player entertained ( they must love the genre nevertheless...)

 

I think that the best inspirational writer in this field is James Nelson with his books about the Brethren of the Coast ( historically perfect for your setting)and the Revolution at Sea ( can be adapted with not much effort).

 

Among the book consituting the two series the Maddest Idea is the one most ripe with ideas... you got Bermuda and New England and a lot of interesting situations for your players to face.

I don't want to spoil the book so if you want a brief synopsis I can send one to you via email.

Then you can consider to adapt some adventures that were created for Run out the guns, the pirate game that ICE ( Rolemaster) supported for a brief period. i don't know the availability but at the website www.guildcompanion.com you should be able to find some used in conventions.

 

Ciao

Andrea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Pirate Hero arrrrrg!

 

You may even want to run around on the Yohoho! Puzzle Pirates forums for some thoughts from the regulars. They may be even willing to give you plot ideas and useful things for Pirate HERO.

 

But I would be careful if they start nitpicking about the differences between a cleaver and a scimitar...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...