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zornwil

Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

I didn't do Hogan because he's more than "Marginally Powered" in my book, he's sort of like a low rent Doc Savage, as it seems he can pull off almost anything his team can. But I love the character, don't get me wrong!

 

I'll think about the thumb but inclined your way. What I like is what some players have asked for is a change environment or transform based on his gestures, such as kicking a soda machine to make a soda come out and the like. This can sort of come in with the thumb.

 

The summon women thing would be great, maybe something like giggly non-useful women, very low-point figures.

 

PS - and thanks much!

 

I find it interesting that you find Hogan more than "marginally powered" but not the Fonz.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

I find it interesting that you find Hogan more than "marginally powered" but not the Fonz.

It's a tough call. But I think Hogan can get any woman as much as Chico or the Fonz, has combat skills on top of it, has disguise and other abilities, leadership, etc.. So I think he deserves the low-rent Savage tag.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Oh. I understand why you do it. I guess I would just rather see the GM commit himself and possibly be wrong rather than take the wimpy "well' date=' there are several ways to do it, you decide" approach.[/quote']

I'd probably do a harder "stop" if I didn't constrain the characters to 50+50, but I like doing so because when I find characters that absolutely don't fit I can be pretty sure they're more than marginally powered. So with those constraints I think flexibility should be encouraged. I don't think it's "wrong" or "right," it's "what should I reasonably fit onto this sheet." There are various things that would also be 'right' but I wouldn't want, because they don't fit in a story whereas they might have fit into one episode, or the like. But I think there's such innovative things you can do with these types of characters, I'd like to hear what a player with his own solid feel for the character would propose rather than inadvertantly discourage it.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

It's a tough call. But I think Hogan can get any woman as much as Chico or the Fonz' date=' has combat skills on top of it, has disguise and other abilities, leadership, etc.. So I think he deserves the low-rent Savage tag.[/quote']

PS - I should admit, too, that as a child Hogan was a hero of mine, so I might not be objective. ;)

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

I'd probably do a harder "stop" if I didn't constrain the characters to 50+50' date=' but I like doing so because when I find characters that absolutely don't fit I can be pretty sure they're more than marginally powered. So with those constraints I think flexibility should be encouraged. I don't think it's "wrong" or "right," it's "what should I reasonably fit onto this sheet." There are various things that would also be 'right' but I wouldn't want, because they don't fit in a story whereas they might have fit into one episode, or the like. But I think there's such innovative things you can do with these types of characters, I'd like to hear what a player with his own solid feel for the character would propose rather than inadvertantly discourage it.[/quote']

 

Fair enough, I guess. But it can be a bit unfair to a player who may end up with a character that they are not terribly familiar with.

 

For example, I am a big sitcom fan and the following characters on your list are all ones that I am familiar with but would have no idea of what should be added to bring them up to their full potential:

 

Chico Rodriguez (of Chico and the Man)

Detectives Yo-Yo and Holmes

Mr. Ed and Wilbur

The Flying Nun (Sister Bertrille) (HDZ file)

The Ghost (Captain Daniel Gregg) (HDZ file) and Mrs. Carolyn Muir (HDZ file)

Phoebe Figalilly (The Nanny) (HDZ file)

Uncle Martin (HDZ file) and his "Nephew" Tim O'Hara (HDZ file)

 

I can just imagine what the unfamiliarity rate must be for people who aren't dedicated sitcom fans. There just isn't enough information on the character sheets for someone unfamiliar with the source material to be able to play the character.

 

Frankly, when I sit down to play a game, unless the write-up specifies that we will be creating characters, I expect to just sit down and play after a brief intro. I am usually not wearing my "character designer" hat at that point and I find being asked to tweak a pre-written character to be an unwanted nuisance and creates a negative impression (to me) of the GM.

 

Also, I'm not sure that forcing the characters into a 50+50 point structure is the right approach to writing up characters like this. As a contrast, I find Darren's Hero All-Stars does a much better job by giving each character the points needed to represent their abilities and better backgrounds as well. The shallow approach that you have taken leaves me with a feeling of the GM not really being familiar with the source material. For example, why do none of the Hogan's Heroes characters have any aircraft-related skills when they were being held in a Luftwaffe prison camp, meaning that they were flyers of some sort?

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

You frighten me...I suppose because of being a lizard-equal and all... :lol:

Well, that's fair, since the thought of a Sith Lord driving the General Lee while waving his lightsaber out the window is very intriguing... :D

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Fair enough, I guess. But it can be a bit unfair to a player who may end up with a character that they are not terribly familiar with.

 

For example, I am a big sitcom fan and the following characters on your list are all ones that I am familiar with but would have no idea of what should be added to bring them up to their full potential:

 

Chico Rodriguez (of Chico and the Man)

Detectives Yo-Yo and Holmes

Mr. Ed and Wilbur

The Flying Nun (Sister Bertrille) (HDZ file)

The Ghost (Captain Daniel Gregg) (HDZ file) and Mrs. Carolyn Muir (HDZ file)

Phoebe Figalilly (The Nanny) (HDZ file)

Uncle Martin (HDZ file) and his "Nephew" Tim O'Hara (HDZ file)

 

I can just imagine what the unfamiliarity rate must be for people who aren't dedicated sitcom fans. There just isn't enough information on the character sheets for someone unfamiliar with the source material to be able to play the character.

 

Frankly, when I sit down to play a game, unless the write-up specifies that we will be creating characters, I expect to just sit down and play after a brief intro. I am usually not wearing my "character designer" hat at that point and I find being asked to tweak a pre-written character to be an unwanted nuisance and creates a negative impression (to me) of the GM.

 

Also, I'm not sure that forcing the characters into a 50+50 point structure is the right approach to writing up characters like this. As a contrast, I find Darren's Hero All-Stars does a much better job by giving each character the points needed to represent their abilities and better backgrounds as well. The shallow approach that you have taken leaves me with a feeling of the GM not really being familiar with the source material. For example, why do none of the Hogan's Heroes characters have any aircraft-related skills when they were being held in a Luftwaffe prison camp, meaning that they were flyers of some sort?

I think you're misunderstanding. I didn't leave anything deliberately out of any importance. All characters are made to be equally functional, although some are fewer points. Within the scale, I don't think any of the points discrepancies matter. You reference being "asked" to tweak, which is hardly the case.

 

Among these characters and for the type of play, I think there is some balance needed, it is different than the other games and so I like to be sure a PC isn't going to be a lot more than 50+50.

 

As to notes on the characters, I don't find that longer notes helps people, the characters are largely caricaturish, and it hasn't been otherwise expressed as an issue.

 

I don't recall a clear reference to which of Hogan's Heroes was realy an aircraft operator, if there's some cite it'd be handy. To your point I should give Newkirk some sort of heavy weaponry/aircraft weaponry familiarity, although it's not exactly as factual as stated that he was a waist turret gunner (it can be inferred somewhat reasonably).

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Re the above, I should add there may be some other misunderstanding here: I do not require or necessarily desire strict adherence to the original character. It's up to the player to define that direction. OddHat's addition of a "cute drinking problem" (very old-school sit-com, too) to Mrs. Muir was a stroke of genius and enjoyment for the table, as an example (even if one of the more outstanding ones).

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Well, we'll just have to agree to disagree. But many of these arguments about portrayals and write-ups of established characters are a big part of the reason that I dislike (or am at least leery of) games with established characters.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

I'

4) It falls into a category of games that I think have been overdone in recent years, which is the grouping of fictional characters from different backgrounds. I blame Alan Moore.

 

It is very popular right now, in part because of the success of Moore. Personally, whie I've never done that in play, I've been doing it in back stories since around 1985. My inspiration was Philip Jose Farmer. As I'm sure you're aware, Farmer and Moore were both following in an honorable tradition themselves.

 

So, plenty of guilt to go around. ;)

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

It is very popular right now, in part because of the success of Moore. Personally, whie I've never done that in play, I've been doing it in back stories since around 1985. My inspiration was Philip Jose Farmer. As I'm sure you're aware, Farmer and Moore were both following in an honorable tradition themselves.

 

So, plenty of guilt to go around. ;)

 

Yeah, I meant that I blamed Alan Moore for the technique currently being overused. I'm well aware that it dates much further back and I think it's an interesting technique but like many interesting techniques it is best used sparingly. For example, I never cared for Roy Thomas' blending of things like Gladiator and Frankenstein (and others possibly but I can't recall right now) with the DC Universe back in Young All-Stars in the late '80s.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Yeah' date=' I meant that I blamed Alan Moore for the technique currently being overused. I'm well aware that it dates much further back and I think it's an interesting technique but like many interesting techniques it is best used sparingly. For example, I never cared for Roy Thomas' blending of things like Gladiator and Frankenstein (and others possibly but I can't recall right now) with the DC Universe back in Young All-Stars in the late '80s.[/quote']

 

I never read those, though I've read of them. Personally, from a game perspective, I think that keeping established characters as back story works best in an ongoing campaign, though for a one shot or convention game I don't mind taking a shot at playing an established character. I can understand not wanting to as well; tastes be tastes.

 

In books and comics, I tend to find off screen references to established characters more interesting than direct character mixing, but once in a while it can go very well. Close tributes work even better for my tastes, as when Farmer introduced Grandith and Caliban, with the conceit that these were the characters on whom the "fictional" Tarzan and Savage were based,

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

All that and not a single mention of Lurch from the Addam's family...

 

For that matter, the whole bloody family is low-powered supers (in my opinion anyway).

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Well' date=' that's fair, since the thought of a Sith Lord driving the General Lee while waving his lightsaber out the window is [i']very[/i] intriguing... :D

thisone should go in the "cross genre nightmares" thread ASAP

edit i put it there myself

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

What are some of the characters that would be included today? Sitcoms are not as popular nowadays as they were.

 

In fact I have a hard time think of any.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

What are some of the characters that would be included today? Sitcoms are not as popular nowadays as they were.

 

In fact I have a hard time think of any.

 

In this decade, most sitcoms that run for a while are the ones aimed at younger viewers. Generally these shows (we're talking about things like Hannah Montana and Corey in the House)are pretty dire, but their audience doesn't care.

 

Characters that might fit in from that genre include Raven (a mild psychic) and Sabrina Spellman (a powerful but inexperienced Witch).

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

I'd just need to write up the major German characters (Klinck, Schultz, the SS guy who's name I forget) and we're off to the races.

 

I believe that the SS guy was Major Wolfgang Hochstetter. You also need to have General Burkhalter as well.

 

:)

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

All that and not a single mention of Lurch from the Addam's family...

 

For that matter, the whole bloody family is low-powered supers (in my opinion anyway).

Yeah, they're a little too powerful actually, I tend to find. Although I have wanted to incorporate certain ones. Same for the Munsters. Lurch is a good pick - though it requires a player with a strong sense of timing and how to make minimalism work.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

Well' date=' we'll just have to agree to disagree. But many of these arguments about portrayals and write-ups of established characters are a big part of the reason that I dislike (or am at least leery of) games with established characters.[/quote']

Yeah, but in my opinion, re such hagglnig, that's largely childishness on the part of people who can't accept that fictional characters can - and should - vary.

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

What are some of the characters that would be included today? Sitcoms are not as popular nowadays as they were.

 

In fact I have a hard time think of any.

Also, the types of sit-coms have changed, with less emphasis on the fantastic and more on the mundane. Scrubs and Seinfeld are my all-time favorite sit-coms but making marginally powered sit-com heroes either stretches those characters unduly or just seems wrong (though you could do it with Kramer or The Todd - what can't that high 5 do, it's saved lives!).

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Re: Marginally Powered Sit-Com Heroes

 

No Heroics

 

British sitcom of low level supers and their day-to-day lives.

Website Wikipedia entry

I've been watching it - and 3 of the 4 main characters are played by folk who used to be in the Absolute Power sitcom about marketing.

 

 

Characters-

No-Heroics-The-Hotness-f8b8993d-cf4b-45d0-aa51-07eca453d225.jpg

Alex, "The Hotness" – Nicholas Burns

 

Alex controls heat and is desperate to be famous for saving the world (or at least someone), but somehow Excelsor always manages to save the day before him. His main work comes in winter when he fills in for the heaters at old peoples homes when they are broken.

 

No-Heroics-Electroclash-dc34092d-9423-4b93-afad-d735940fbb1a.jpg

Sarah, "Electroclash" – Claire Keelan

 

Sarah can control machines with her voice. However she would rather steal a pack of cigarettes from a machine than help the ‘normal’ world with her power. Seen as the most rock ‘n’ roll of the bunch, Sarah is the daughter of famous superheroes "Rampart" and "Velvet Veil", described by Sarah as the "Torvill and Dean" or the "Richard and Judy" of the superhero world. She is Alex’s on-off love interest, having broken up with him some time prior to the start of the series. Sarah was a member of the short lived superhero team known as Ladytrouble, alongside Jenny (She-Force).

 

No-Heroics-Timebomb-e80aceb2-0e1e-4afc-9ec4-fecbe2f1c2a3.jpg

Don, "Timebomb" – James Lance

 

Don can see sixty seconds into the future and is an expert in torture. However, these days the homosexual Spaniard only uses his abilities to his friends’ advantage, due to his retirement only taking on a sparse few jobs to keep the cash rolling. He is also an ex-drug addict, and appears to be addicted to sex with strangers.

 

No-Heroics-She-Force-b8af477b-e02f-4a78-b4bf-16d4bb6e1aa7.jpg

Jenny, "She-Force" – Rebekah Staton

 

Jenny has super-strength and is the third strongest woman in the world, but doesn't feel comfortable being a superhero. She would much rather spend her days at her desk, waiting for Mr Right to come along. Socially awkward, Jenny revels in having a secret identity as an office worker, a charade her friends find pointless. Jenny was a member of the short lived superhero team known as Ladytrouble, alongside Sarah (Electroclash).

 

No-Heroics-Excelsor-7888c38d-9f1a-4957-84f8-a1db1b83bc24.jpg

Devlin, "Excelsor" – Patrick Baladi

 

Devlin is the most successful cape in the United Kingdom; he is a "Rock Star" within the superhero world, with a high public profile and numerous commercial endorsement deals. Due to his immense success Devlin's attitude is highly egotistical and selfish, and he takes pleasure in reminding Alex and the other "lesser" superheroes of his superiority at every opportunity, often by bullying Alex. Devlin has a wide array of powers, which include but aren't limited to: flight, laser eye beams, X-ray vision, super speed, force field creation and manipulation, super sensitive hearing, and mind control abilities.

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