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That's a beautiful and mechanically interesting rifle. I was expecting two separate bolts with gear teeth on the back, largely because I unthinkingly assumed that they'd have forward locking lugs. I do wonder about the setback of the bolt faces under recoil, given that you've got both the stretching of the receiver and the compressing of the bolts going on. Obviously it's not a problem; I'm just curious as to how far they move.

 

Maybe it's because I'm not a famous firearms designer, but MY solution to "a little more capacity to it than a double-barreled, but also . . . a little more rapid rate of fire than a bolt action" would be a semi-automatic. I know, NOT traditional for African game hunting, and it makes people think of matte finishes and plastic hardware, but there's no reason you COULDN'T make a semi-automatic big-bore rifle with high-polish blued steel and fine walnut furniture.

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As I understand it, lever-actions have a tendency to go awry under the stress of the heavier calibres, becoming unreliable. Plus, if you want firepower right-here right-now, pump and lever are no faster than bolt-action.

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The Lee-Endield had rear locking lugs. The fluting on the bolt busy is pretty significant on the rifle above. There probably isn’t a lot of distortion, seeing how heavily the receiver is built up around the bolt. I love th scope mount. So much mor precise than the cu r not fad for Picatnny rails. I did see recently an M-1 Garand chambered in .450 Magnum, and that may be the semi-auto solution some were working for. 

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17 hours ago, Sundog said:

Plus, if you want firepower right-here right-now, pump and lever are no faster than bolt-action.

I've seen numerous people getting multiple spent shells in the air at once with lever and pump actions, but I've never seen anyone do that with a bolt action.

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17 hours ago, Zeropoint said:

I've seen numerous people getting multiple spent shells in the air at once with lever and pump actions, but I've never seen anyone do that with a bolt action.

 

Nor I, but the question arises: Were they hitting anything at that fast a rate of fire?

 

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Actually, yes.  I'm not a great marksman, but I have a little Browning .22 lever action rifle that I can put rounds through quickly and on target.  I'm not quite as fast with it as with my Ruger semi-auto 10-22, but I'm at least as accurate out to 25 yards.

I've also got a Browning 20-gauge pump shotgun that I can shoot quickly enough to keep up with most semi-autos for five shots . . . a couple of former coworkers were amazed that I could fire so quickly with it, but I've been shooting that particular shotgun for over 30 years.  I carried it when quail hunting in my teens and learned to be fast with it in the brush.  We didn't have enough clay pigeons in the air at any one time to see if I was hitting much, though--I was simply shooting for speed when I was demonstrating it.

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4 hours ago, Sundog said:

 

Nor I, but the question arises: Were they hitting anything at that fast a rate of fire?

 

Sure -- if using K11's or K31's!

 

The Schmidt-Rubin K11 (and later, the K31) are Swiss-made, straight-pull bolt action rifles designed by Rudolf Schmidt, a mechanical engineer who understood that two motions (pull back, push forward) instead of 4 motions (lift up, pull back, push forward, push down) would result in a halving of the time to actuate the bolt … thereby nearly doubling the rate of fire with no change in or loss of accuracy.

 

In addition to the straight-pull bolt, these rifles also have amazingly crisp triggers and free-floated barrels.  Considering the K11 was first produced in 1911 and was arrived at from improvements on designs dating back to 1889, the K11 was revolutionary in terms of speed and accuracy in bolt-action guns of the day.  The K11 easily put Lee Enfields of the same era to shame … without really trying.  Aside from the really long takeup on the K11, the crispness of the 100+ year old trigger on my own bone-stock K11 actually puts the non-adjustable triggers of most modern rifles to shame, too, IMHO.


The downside was the cost and complexity to manufacture the rifle … which is why this type of action likely isn't common, today.  The Swiss, of course, did it both right … and well.

 

 

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On 10/8/2018 at 8:06 PM, Zeropoint said:

I've seen numerous people getting multiple spent shells in the air at once with lever and pump actions, but I've never seen anyone do that with a bolt action.

 

IIRC the British trick with their Lee-Enfields was to leave the trigger hand on the bolt and strum the trigger with the middle finger to fire. 

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39 minutes ago, Old Man said:

 

IIRC the British trick with their Lee-Enfields was to leave the trigger hand on the bolt and strum the trigger with the middle finger to fire. 

Bolt handle and trigger placement is the key. The British Pattern14 rifle, was basically a Mauser action copy, but with a dogleg in the bolt handle, to bring the hand to the same position as on the SMLE This carried over to the US M-1917. The French did Similar to their MAS 36, but it’s scratchy bolt, and heavy trigger kind of messed that up. 

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On 9/29/2018 at 8:27 AM, Scott Ruggels said:

  30mmm is up there with the .58 caliber  black powder projectiles.  Thopugh even a four gauge  "elephant gun" from the black powder era would need a shoulder stock. 30mm Recoil, without significant recoil mitigation (weight, hydraulic recuperators, significan padding and bracing structures),  would be nearly as detrimental to the user as the target. Remember Muzzle energy goes both ways.

Usually the 30 mm in reference to the bore diameter so that would be a 1.2 inch diameter bullet. A conventional pistol would require somebody to have growth I would say to be able to hold it if the magazine was in the grip

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2 hours ago, gewing said:

Usually the 30 mm in reference to the bore diameter so that would be a 1.2 inch diameter bullet. A conventional pistol would require somebody to have growth I would say to be able to hold it if the magazine was in the grip

 

Yep, Unless it has a forward magazine like a Mauser broomhandle, and the cartridges were stubby like M-79's it would still be no fun to shoot, but the weight might be manageable.

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Pistols, you say?

 

rndz18-700cp-lead.jpg

 

Remington 700 CP bolt-action "pistol" comes in .223, .308, and .300BLK, and has a buffer tube attachment point for mounting "arm braces".

 

 

scw9-right-e1542233913767.jpg

 

Angstadt SCW-9 comes in 9mm, .223, and .300BLK versions.

 

 

Micro-9-Cover.jpg

 

New Kimber Micro 9s could fit perfectly into your cyberpunk campaign.

 

PillBoxEdit1-1.jpg

 

GSL's Pill Box suppressor, for when you need quiet and concealability.

 

All pics shamelessly stolen from thefirearmblog.com.

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The GSL Pillbox appears to rely on wipes, which is basically Vietnam-era tech (with modern materials used for the wipe, of course).  I can't say I'm a fan of wipe-based suppressors given that wipes must be replaced -- usually within 3-4 magazines worth of ammo in order to maintain the same effectiveness as they had with the first round fired.  The fact that the wipe changes over time (due it being shot through) and the fact that the exiting bullet touches the wipe … always has me wondering what wipes do to POI, especially over time/reuse of the same wipe.  Still, it's interesting to see a suppressor THAT small!

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Soteria Suppressors is actually doing a lot of research into patterns for hard  baffle suppressors, so, no wipes. Here's a video showing how their suppressors work, in sloooooowwww motion. In slow motion, as Destin explains, you can see the engineering challenges.

 

 

 

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