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Automobiles of the Pulp Era


MisterVimes
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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

If I remember his story correctly, my dad's first car was a Cadillac V-12 that was ten years old when he got it (he graduated from high school in 1946). I never saw that car; it was a young man's tinker-with-it-yourself car and he'd got rid of it before he met my mother. AFAIK he didn't keep any pictures of it, which is a shame, really.

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

If I remember his story correctly' date=' my dad's first car was a Cadillac V-12 that was ten years old when he got it (he graduated from high school in 1946). I never saw that car; it was a young man's tinker-with-it-yourself car and he'd got rid of it before he met my mother. AFAIK he didn't keep any pictures of it, which is a shame, really.[/quote']

 

This would be the model. She's a beaut.

 

9db0ccaf15.jpg

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

"You must spread some reputation around before giving it to MisterVimes again."

 

Ha. Thank you. Finding vehicles, movies, and music from the ear has become a hobby with me. Before my girlfriend's grandfather passed away, he and I were in the same room and there was a song that he used to dance to with his late wife. From his description I was able to find the song and play it for him.

 

Everyone must have a talent. Mine is finding people and things :)

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

The one car of that era I do remember riding in was a 1936 Plymouth Coupe that my maternal grandfather still had in 1960-62. That model car is the 2nd image on this page though the one there, of course, is a museum piece. The one I rode in had pale green paint that was all oxidized and came off on your hand in a powder if you touched it.

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

The one car of that era I do remember riding in was a 1936 Plymouth Coupe that my maternal grandfather still had in 1960-62. That model car is the 2nd image on this page though the one there' date=' of course, is a museum piece. The one I rode in had pale green paint that was all oxidized and came off on your hand in a powder if you touched it.[/quote']

 

I love those 1930s cars. One of these days I'll buy one.

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

This would be the model. She's a beaut.

 

9db0ccaf15.jpg

 

The Chrysler PT Cruiser seems to have been modeled along those lines, which is why I like the look of that car.

 

I love those 1930s cars. One of these days I'll buy one.

 

I have that same dream. There is a Mercedes-Benz dealership near my gym that showcases antique roadsters, and I can stop and look if I have time.

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

The Chrysler PT Cruiser seems to have been modeled along those lines, which is why I like the look of that car.

 

 

 

I have that same dream. There is a Mercedes-Benz dealership near my gym that showcases antique roadsters, and I can stop and look if I have time.

 

According to my old man, who worked for Chrysler/Dodge for 40 years, the PT cruiser drew inspiration from a lot of cars of the era (as you say) but most specifically the 1934 Chrysler Airflow

 

1934-Chrysler-Airflow_lit_i.gif

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

When I was a kid, we had a 1941 Dodge. It was beige and had tweed seats that were scratchy on my thighs on summer days when I had to wear short pants. I was still small enough that my knees did not reach the edge of the seat. As a consequence, my feet were suspended halfway between the edge of my seat and the backs of the seat in front. The only concession to safety that I could see was a strap across the back of the seat in front of me. I guess that was so you would have the illusion of safety because you have something to grab onto in case of an emergency. In retrospect I think it may have been a deluxe model because it had wing windows behind the rear doors. It also had what I learned later were optional running boards. It was hard for me to see out of because the windowsills were above my eye level unless I kneeled in the seat or stood on the floorboards, Or stood on the running boards while clinging to the B-pillars just like in the gangster movies or from the Untouchables on TV.

 

Here is a link to the "how stuff works" page for that model: 1941 Dodge Custom Town Sedan.

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

When I was a kid' date=' we had a 1941 Dodge. It was beige and had tweed seats that were scratchy on my thighs on summer days when I had to wear short pants. I was still small enough that my knees did not reach the edge of the seat. As a consequence, my feet were suspended halfway between the edge of my seat and the backs of the seat in front. The only concession to safety that I could see was a strap across the back of the seat in front of me. I guess that was so you would have the illusion of safety because you have something to grab onto in case of an emergency. In retrospect I think it may have been a deluxe model because it had wing windows behind the rear doors. It also had what I learned later were [i']optional [/i]running boards. It was hard for me to see out of because the windowsills were above my eye level unless I kneeled in the seat or stood on the floorboards, Or stood on the running boards while clinging to the B-pillars just like in the gangster movies or from the Untouchables on TV.

 

Here is a link to the "how stuff works" page for that model: 1941 Dodge Custom Town Sedan.

 

Always a favorite of mine.

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

Always a favorite of mine.

 

Despite the scratchy seats, it was my favorite car of all the ones we (my family) ever owned. It threw a rod in 1968 while my dad was several hundred miles from home, applying for a job. He had enough cash to get home, but not enough to fix the car, so it's long since been parted out.

 

I still miss that car. :(

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Re: Automobiles of the Pulp Era

 

The car from this era that I always liked was the big steam powered Doble. A luxury vehicle with enormous range compared to its contemporaries (1500 miles !). Could also start from cold in one and a half minutes, but I think that they were expensive and not a lot were made. Still, sounds like just the thing for your P C's to turn up at a fancy soiree in .

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