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Hello hero friends,

 

I would like to know how you do with Mental Illusion. One of the characters in my party plays a kind of spider mage. One of his spells is a hallucination that makes the victim believe that spider out of her wounds and mouth. But once the victim finds the spider and what happens to him. What happens in terms of combat. Ie if the spell is cast on a great warrior in the process of this fight is that its combat statistics are affected? OCV DCV or it can not attack until a successful breakout roll. I set the spell to ego + 10

 

Thank you all for your replies

 

Steph

 

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In our group we have found that the MI effects, such as spiders pouring out of wounds or weapons becoming snakes, is descriptive only and the actual game intent is to stop some course of action like swinging a sword, casting spells, or fighting all together. So the visual effect isnt as important as its intended affect.

 

With that in mind, we equate the levels of effect to translate into specific reductions in actions. A roll that equals Ego + 0 can be a loss of a half action, Ego +10 is a full action loss and -1 or -2 to DCV, depending on how clever the illusion or how it may play on the target's fears, etc. Note, if the purpose of the illusion is to get the target to move or avoid an area then the loss of actions is replaced with change in movement modifiers.

 

The Limitation of No Control can reflect that the Illusion pulls out the target's fear to change his or her actions, saving the conflict between GM and player of deciding how to interpret the end result of the illusion. But if the player like the spider theme, then agreeing on ahead of time what the the end goal of the illusion help both side play more smoothly by avoiding arguments of what should happen.

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If the intention is to create a horrifying distraction, I'd consider buying it not as Mental Illusion but as a PRE attack bonus with the SFX of being an illusion. In fact, even if you do this as Mental Illusion I'd say it constitutes a PRE attack.

 

If you do it as Mental Illusion, you can either come up with some standard effect as fr2itus suggests or, if you're comfortable with it, making a judgment call every time on a case by case basis.

 

Lucius Alexander

 

​Creating an illusionary palindromedary over the real palindromedary

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If the intention is to create a horrifying distraction, I'd consider buying it not as Mental Illusion but as a PRE attack bonus with the SFX of being an illusion. In fact, even if you do this as Mental Illusion I'd say it constitutes a PRE attack.

 

If you do it as Mental Illusion, you can either come up with some standard effect as fr2itus suggests or, if you're comfortable with it, making a judgment call every time on a case by case basis.

 

Lucius Alexander

 

​Creating an illusionary palindromedary over the real palindromedary

I agree, this type of MI would be better represented with a PRE attack than MI. By RAW MI cannot have any effect on the players stats (other than causing damage with a high enough effect roll). If you want to build a MI that does something like that you would also need to buy a change environment linked to the MI (and possibly limited as well) to reflect the stat modifiers you want the MI to cause. Otherwise you are making MI more powerful than it already is.
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In our group we have found that the MI effects, such as spiders pouring out of wounds or weapons becoming snakes, is descriptive only and the actual game intent is to stop some course of action like swinging a sword, casting spells, or fighting all together. So the visual effect isnt as important as its intended affect.

 

With that in mind, we equate the levels of effect to translate into specific reductions in actions. A roll that equals Ego + 0 can be a loss of a half action, Ego +10 is a full action loss and -1 or -2 to DCV, depending on how clever the illusion or how it may play on the target's fears, etc. Note, if the purpose of the illusion is to get the target to move or avoid an area then the loss of actions is replaced with change in movement modifiers.

 

The Limitation of No Control can reflect that the Illusion pulls out the target's fear to change his or her actions, saving the conflict between GM and player of deciding how to interpret the end result of the illusion. But if the player like the spider theme, then agreeing on ahead of time what the the end goal of the illusion help both side play more smoothly by avoiding arguments of what should happen.

That's pretty clever. I like it.
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