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“There’s no point in acting surprised about it. All the planning charts and demolition orders have been on display at your local planning department in Alpha Centauri for 50 of your Earth years, so you’ve had plenty of time to lodge any formal complaint and it’s far too late to start making a fuss about it now. … What do you mean you’ve never been to Alpha Centauri? Oh, for heaven’s sake, mankind, it’s only four light years away, you know. I’m sorry, but if you can’t be bothered to take an interest in local affairs, that’s your own lookout. Energize the demolition beams.”

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36 minutes ago, death tribble said:

This says something about me.

I saw the headline and thought 'Red Light District'

My bad.

Me too. 

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Portland philanthropist Arlene Schnitzer, especially known as a patron of the arts, has passed away from natural causes unrelated to coronavirus. Her name is on the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall (home of the Oregon Symphony) and she recently gave $10 million to the arts museum she has been a patron of for decades.

 

The Schnitzers, one of the first Jewish families to rise to prominence in what was then primarily Protestant Portland (what was also staunchly conservative and Republican at the time -- and not at all welcoming to racial or religious minorities), made their fortune in steel, real estate, and construction (Harsch Corporation is the leading such firm in the city to this day). Before the Schnitzers began active philanthropy, Portland's art institution were modest and borderline amateur. Today the Oregon Symphony and Portland Art Museum are professionally run and there are numerous large-scale arts patrons in the city.

 

Now I have been publicly skeptical of large-scale philanthropy, but I don't know that there's anything bad to say about Arlene Schnitzer and her love of the arts.

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1 hour ago, Michael Hopcroft said:

 

Now I have been publicly skeptical of large-scale philanthropy, but

 

 

Well, don't stop now 

 

Either you believe something, or you don't.  ;)

 

On another tioic: have you heard from your mother yet?  I expect we were all concerned after your last post. 

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Duke Bushido said:

 

 

Well, don't stop now 

 

Either you believe something, or you don't.  ;)

 

On another tioic: have you heard from your mother yet?  I expect we were all concerned after your last post. 

 

 

Yes. And she was rather upset about my concerns and near-panic. I thank you for thinking of her and me in these stressful times.

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kanopy.com has a few zillion documentaries to stream for free if you have a library card from a participating library system.  It includes a whole bunch of Great Courses stuff.

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On 4/4/2020 at 10:04 AM, death tribble said:

This says something about me.

I saw the headline and thought 'Red Light District'

My bad.

 

Yes, but one is morally unjustifiable, and the other has to do with prostitution.

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As an Australian, I take pride in the fact that we are at least proportionately as evil as the rest of the world.

 

And a little disturbed by the possibility that we may punch above our own weight in this respect.

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On 4/3/2020 at 6:24 PM, Old Man said:

 

Yes. 

 

Laughing like a maniac the whole time. 

Adams got it wrong: telephone sanitizers are essential people;  civilian businesses turning government activity into a for-profit industry?  Not so much. 

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2020 Hugo Award Finalists Announced

 

Best Novel

  • The City in the Middle of the Night, by Charlie Jane Anders (Tor; Titan)
  • Gideon the Ninth, by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Light Brigade, by Kameron Hurley (Saga; Angry Robot UK)
  • A Memory Called Empire, by Arkady Martine (Tor; Tor UK)
  • Middlegame, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Ten Thousand Doors of January, by Alix E. Harrow (Redhook; Orbit UK)

Best Novella

  • “Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom”, by Ted Chiang (Exhalation (Borzoi/Alfred A. Knopf; Picador)
  • The Deep, by Rivers Solomon, with Daveed Diggs, William Hutson & Jonathan Snipes (Saga Press/Gallery)
  • The Haunting of Tram Car 015, by P. Djèlí Clark (Tor.com Publishing)
  • In an Absent Dream, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • This Is How You Lose the Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone (Saga Press; Jo Fletcher Books)
  • To Be Taught, If Fortunate, by Becky Chambers (Harper Voyager; Hodder & Stoughton)

Best Novelette

  •  “The Archronology of Love”, by Caroline M. Yoachim (Lightspeed, April 2019)
  • “Away With the Wolves”, by Sarah Gailey (Uncanny Magazine: Disabled People Destroy Fantasy Special Issue, September/October 2019)
  • “The Blur in the Corner of Your Eye”, by Sarah Pinsker (Uncanny Magazine, July-August 2019)
  • Emergency Skin, by N.K. Jemisin (Forward Collection (Amazon))
  • “For He Can Creep”, by Siobhan Carroll (Tor.com, 10 July 2019)
  • “Omphalos”, by Ted Chiang (Exhalation (Borzoi/Alfred A. Knopf; Picador))

Best Short Story

  • “And Now His Lordship Is Laughing”, by Shiv Ramdas (Strange Horizons, 9 September 2019)
  • “As the Last I May Know”, by S.L. Huang (Tor.com, 23 October 2019)
  • “Blood Is Another Word for Hunger”, by Rivers Solomon (Tor.com, 24 July 2019)
  • “A Catalog of Storms”, by Fran Wilde (Uncanny Magazine, January/February 2019)
  • “Do Not Look Back, My Lion”, by Alix E. Harrow (Beneath Ceaseless Skies, January 2019)
  • “Ten Excerpts from an Annotated Bibliography on the Cannibal Women of Ratnabar Island”, by Nibedita Sen (Nightmare Magazine, May 2019)

Best Series

  • The Expanse, by James S. A. Corey (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • InCryptid, by Seanan McGuire (DAW)
  • Luna, by Ian McDonald (Tor; Gollancz)
  • Planetfall series, by Emma Newman (Ace; Gollancz)
  • Winternight Trilogy, by Katherine Arden (Del Rey; Del Rey UK)
  • The Wormwood Trilogy, by Tade Thompson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

 

There are lots more categories.

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4 hours ago, Old Man said:

I don't understand the new definitions of short and long forms in the Dramatic Presentation categories. Miniseries like Good Omens are in the same category as feature films like Avengers: Endgame. At the same time, two separate episodes of Watchmen are nominated for Short Form but the series as a whole isn't nominated in Long Form. I know the landscape is changing, but I don't understand this.

 

I wonder how the events of this year will affect the Hugos,

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