Jump to content

On This Day in History


GhostDancer
 Share

Recommended Posts

December 18th 218 BC. Battle of Trebia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Trebia

 

December 18th 1916. End of the Battle of Verdun as the second French offensive pushes the Germans back several kilometres

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Verdun

 

December 18th 1980 a day that will live in infamy. Christina Aguilera is born. She is now 40. The Abyss help us all.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Aguilera

Link to comment
Share on other sites

December 19th 1981 The Penlee Lifeboat Disaster. This is my part of the world so it hits home especially close to Christmas

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penlee_lifeboat_disaster

 

December 19th 1983. The original Jules Rimet trophy is stolen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIFA_World_Cup_Trophy#Jules_Rimet_Trophy

 

December 19th 1980 Jake Gyllenhaal is born and is thus is a date that will live in some sort of notoriety

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jake_Gyllenhaal

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

In this day in history was officially my last day of being able to work at a paying job: 15 years ago.

 

Still thankful that I managed to drive myself home from work without an accident.

 

(I say "officially" because my workplace lost the paperwork of my exact last day and the Social Security Administration said to call it January 2nd. The actual date was sometime at the beginning of January. I nearly killed myself trying to drag myself to work when I wasn't really able to drive, couldn't do the work after I got there, and had to leave early to drive myself home in a harrowing experience...for several days in a row before I finally had to give up and admit that I wasn't capable of physically or mentally doing my job anymore.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, Pariah said:

On this date 125 years ago--January 4th, 1896--Utah became the 45th State in the Union.

 

(My great-grandmother was born in Utah eight days later.)

 

Very cool.

 

May your beehives be healthy and your honey harvest undiminished, forever and ever. Amen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, L. Marcus said:

Ah, Uttah is a myth.

 

So are all the states, really, except for Minnesota. And Delaware. 

 

I think Minnesota is a myth.

 

When I went up there and tried to order one, they told me I could have a large cola or an extra large. But no Minne.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1958- The Battle of Hayes Pond or Maxton Riot was an armed confrontation between members of the Ku Klux Klan and the Lumbee Native Americans at a Klan rally near Maxton, North Carolina, on the night of January 18, 1958. Grand Dragon James W. "Catfish" Cole was the organizer of the Klan rally. Wikipedia
Location: Maxton, NC
Resulted in: Lumbee victory; Klan ceases activity in area
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I remember that day well.

 

It was my final year in grad school.  My funding had been cut off (there was a rule giving a maximum period that a grad student could be supported that had long been on the books; it was ignored all across campus because the two different offices who needed to communicate in order to enforce it ... couldn't; the two finally got the technological wherewithal to do that enforcement and a number of us were caught in that), so I was living on a student loan, had literally no other responsibilities, and was in a monomaniacal six-month sprint to get done before that money ran out.

 

In early January I had settled into a routine where I woke up about noon, went to campus in time to do whatever interactions with other humans were necessary.  (As an example: this was back in the days of campus mainframe computers, on which you had an account and importantly it had account limits, and once you spent all the fake money in your account you had to genuflect to the proper office in order to get more.  This happened to me every few weeks.  There were other annoying bits of paper that would come in that required signing, committee members from whom you needed a statement about their preferences, etc.)  Then I'd go back to my cave about 5:00PM, have my big meal of the day, then go back to campus, park my butt in the department's terminal room, and work solid until 3 or 4 AM, then back home and sleep.  Repeat until the depression caught up with me, then stay home, go through my music-aided routine to go as far down as I could and come back up and get back to work in a minimum amount of time, because once every ten or twelve days I could take afford to one day off but I couldn't take two.

 

So that day I woke up and walked to the bus stop.  It was a gloriously, no, a preternaturally nice day in Austin: not a cloud in the sky, no wind to speak of, temperature in the 70s (January, remember), and nothing like the Gulf air humidity that rules in central Texas from March through October.  Got on the bus (and it was just me, two other riders, and the driver), and the radio was on.  Almost as if he was talking to me personally, between songs the DJ made the comment, "In case you've heard no news today, the Shuttle exploded during launch this morning," and cued up the next song.

 

While I was even then acquainted with a couple of astronauts, none of the ones I knew were on Challenger, which was about the only mercy I had about the event.

 

I was working at the astronomy department of course, and the seminar room had CNN going so when I got there I had only a few minutes to wait before I saw the launch sequence again, and I didn't need to listen to the talking heads once that replay was over.  What CNN didn't say but everyone in the department knew was that all shuttle launches would have to be halted until they figured out what went wrong; that the Hubble Space Telescope launch (and some other science, of course) was thereby also indefinitely on hold; and all this came on top of the passage of the Gramm-Rudman Act some six weeks earlier.  That last was the first of the horizontal federal budget reduction chainsaw measures, which had caused the National Science Foundation and entities it funded (including the national observatories) to put their postdoctoral fellowship programs on hold, because this being the first of these horizontal cut measures, no one knew what it meant in terms of money.  That all by itself had removed a big chunk of possible post-graduation jobs from what would be available for me when I got done that summer.  With HST suddenly at least on hold for who knows how long, it was a major compounding the uncertainty I had to contend with as I needed to focus on getting the thesis done.

 

The presidential commission did their work on the disaster over very nearly the same interval as I did on my thesis; I defended on the last Tuesday in May, while they submitted their report in early June.  I confess I didn't watch much of the TV coverage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

spacer.pngNot all heroes wear capes.

 

On this date in 1842, Danish botanist Emil Christian Hansen was born. He developed new sanitary methods to culture yeast and refused to patent the method, but instead made it available for free to other brewers.

 

Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...