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Classic Cinematic Battles in Hero


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I have an idea I want to pursue in the coming months as I have time (and others should contribute as they think of battles as well) in which I break down a classic TV or movie fight scene in Hero terms.  The first one I want to do is the final confrontation in Unforgiven where Sheriff "Little" Bill Daggett dies.    Some of them are so long or complicated they're really tough to pull off in a description for a game, but there are a lot of great ones. Like the lobby scene in The Matrix or final battle between Bolo Yeung and Jean Claude Van Damme in Bloodsport.

 

What are some other film scenes that would be fun or interesting to do?

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Larger scale battles are also possible, I'm sure, like anything involving any army, but would take a lot more work. I bet there are even more movies featuring interesting army battles than there are one-on-one fights. What do you think? I've often thought of doing this for non-combat things, too, like specific scenes from movies or cartoons where other powers are used. Presence attacks, etc. 

 

My suggestions, in no particular order, would be:

 

1. The final showdown between Vice-Consul DuPont and John Preston in the movie Equilibrium. One sequence in particular, where they're standing within HTH reach, and they're each trying to get a shot in with pistol, but are continually being blocked by the other is quite impressive.

 

 

2. The Wizard duel between Gandalf and Saroman.

 

3. The battle between Wolverine and that other girl with metal claws.

 

4. Possibly something from Harry Potter would be unique but I'm not familiar with the movies.

 

5. The break dance fight from Zoolander

 

6. The triple duel in the final scene of The Good The Bad and The Ugly. It would be a simple demonstration of Lightning Reflexes, Fast Draw, Combat Skill Levels, but some other stuff which, in the movie, rendered Tuco's gun without bullets. Luck? Or, for that same as-yet-unknown power, a scene from another Clint Eastwood Western where he's wearing a steel plate under his poncho that helps him survive. Maybe something rPD, No Conscious Control. I realize he planned it before hand, so it's nothing out of the ordinary, but an RPG scenario, you may not have had a chance to think ahead like a screenplay writer.

 

Great question!

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Isn't there a famous scene from Star Trek where one of the non-Klingon characters is forced into a duel with one of the Klingon weapons?

 

Which leads me to a further suggestion:

 

THE LIGHTSABER BATTLE BETWEEN OBI-WAN, QUI-GON AND DARTH MAUL FROM PHANTOM OF THE MENACE

 

That one even has the death of a good guy and immediate revenge, plus a mix of HTH and other powers.

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In theory this would be good to duplicate in other forums for gamers, to interest people in how hero works and what you can do.  I was lying in bed last night thinking about the Unforgiven fight and how easy it was to simulate in Hero with presence attacks and so on.  Its a really gritty battle but has a very clean progression of events and Hero duplicates it very well.

 

Other possibilities:
-The clifftop sword fight between The Dread Pirate Roberts and Inigo Montoya in Princess Bride

-The Lava/slag field fight between Anakin and Obi Wan (as craptastic as the films were, some good fight scenes in the prequels) in Revenge of the Sith

-The restaurant fight scene between Yu Shu Lien (Michelle Yeoh) and Jen Yu (Zhang Ziyi) in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

-Flying wing fight scene between the hulking sergeant and Indiana Jones in Raiders of the Lost Ark

-The fight in the factory between T-800 and T-1000 in Terminator 2

-Fight on top of the poles in Iron Monkey

-Final fight in Rapid Fire between Brandon Lee and Al Leong (sniff, Brandon Lee, such a loss :( )

-Any one of 50 Jackie Chan battles

-Staircase battle in The Protector with Tony Jaa and 900 thugs

-Ip Man vs 10 Karate masters in the movie with the same name

-The Alley fight between Roddy Piper and Keith David in They Live

-Final battle in the mirrors, Enter the Dragon

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Phase 12, Dex 18.  T-Rex begins fight with Pre attack.  30 Pre is 6D6,  +3D6 incredibly violent action (smash building),  +1D6 target is surprised, +1D6 exhibiting a power, +2D6 target in partial retreat.  T-Rex gets 30+ effect above lawyer's Pre score.  Target is cowed, at 0 DCV.  T-Rex uses multi-attack grab/bite attack,  OCV 6 + 3 levels HTH, -1 OCV for grab, vs lawyer's DCV 0.  T-Rex misses on an 18.  T-Rex does not roll an 18.

 

48 Str Grab vs lawyer's 10 Str.  Grab successful.  5D6+1 HKA (w/ Str) reduced penetration vs lawyer's 0 rPD.  T-Rex rolls 19 Body, 38 Stun (hit location stomach).  Lawyer is at -9 Body, -18 Stun.  Fight over.

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Many against a few:

  • LOTR - Battle of Amon - Very skilled fighters vs. minions (but not necessarily one hit wonders).  And hobbits ability to hide.
  • LOTR - Battle at Balin's Tomb - Everyone beat up on the cave troll now!  Nice scene where Boromir is stunned by the cave troll.    Also when Frodo is stabbed and stunned (KO?) by the troll.
  • Captain America - Elevator Fight scene
  • Thor vs. Iron Man vs. Captain America - Knockback.  Lots of collateral damage.  The Iron Man suit being slowly destroyed as it is taking body from Thor's attacks.
  • Incredibles fighting in the Jungle - Teamwork
  • Incredibles + Frozone vs. Robot
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The film starts in the northern mountains of Brythunia. There, a tiny backwards village lies, far away from the rest of the world. The Simarians are a comfy folk living on the northern border, originally founded by a small community of luddites shunning the civilized wonders of Brythunia for a more “honest” rural life. Using distorted and piecemeal information gathered from drunk adventurers and senile folklorists, they model themselves after the Cimmerians, though their society leaves a lot to be desired in terms of accuracy. They worship Krumm, a mashup of Cimmerian and Nordic mythology whitewashed into a benevolent deity to suit their drippy ideals. Not actually knowing how to make proper swords, they use simple casting techniques to create attractive but impractical replicas: since they rarely meet other people, they never actually test their weapons in combat. This is the tribe of Konahn. Young Konahn has a happy childhood with his nice dad and hot mother, with no bandits or dangerous beasts to contend with, and no feudal lords to oppress them.

 

However, Konahn’s life is torn apart when the Riders of Thulsa Doom come. Thulsa Doom was originally Jamsh’el Jon, a Kushite scribe working for a minor Stygian priest, who started to get delusions of grandeur, and changed his name to that of the famed Thurian-era sorcerer. It wasn’t until he made a laughable attempt to usurp Thoth-Amon that he was banished, though the ineptitude of his actions were so amusing, Thoth-Amon let him live. He travels around the little kingdoms of the Corinthian Marches, where he joins up with Rexor and Thorgrim, and their band of “Vanir.” They are Gundermen, but a bit touched in the head, and pretend to be Vanir warriors — Rexor with a ludicrous triple axe, and Thorgrim with an infeasibly huge hammer. At some point, Doom discovers an ancient tome of great sorcerous power: he can barely understand most of it, but learns a few interesting parlour tricks like mesmerism, snake-charming and the illusion of turning into a snake. They try in vain to find communities to enslave using this power, but even the most tiny villages put up too much of a fight – until they learn of the Simarian village in the north.

 

Mother and father fight valiantly, but even their replica swords are not enough to fight against the LARPVanir’s slightly better made replicas. Father is killed by some mangy dogs, and Doom hypnotises Konahn’s mother before decapitating her in the first and last display of fighting prowess he ever achieves. Konahn and his fellow Simarian children are then taken to a mill way in the Corinthian Marches: ostensibly it’s a grain mill, but in fact it’s a great exercise in futility to break spirit and increase strength for heavy labour (Quite why the slavemaster didn’t take them to an actual grain mill to maximise profits is unknown, but likely due to his unholy crossbreeding between a Zamorian imbecile and a she-ape that escaped from a Hyrkanian circus). Fed on a high-protein diet, Konahn’s muscles and mass balloon, and he is bought for a local fight pit. Even though he has no combat training, the fighters he is pitted against are similarly unexperienced, and are even sorrier fighters than he is. Against such useless opponents, Konahn cannot help but rise through the ranks. He then is taken to “The Far East”… which turns out to be the Eastern side of the desolate northern Corinthian marches, trained by “War Masters,” a crowd of Khitanophile wargamers presenting themselves as experts. Eventually they release Konahn, not because he became too strong, but because they heard their father was coming and wouldn’t take kindly to their use of his lunas.

 

The Simarian spends about a day in the wilderness, though it seems more like a month to the the casual observer. Chased by wild dogs, he comes across the “Atlantean Tomb,” and finds the “Atlantean Sword”: not an actual tomb, it is the remnants of an old museum where history enthusiasts and their protesting families would go to see a display of an Acheronian King. Taking the tin sword, he meets a harlot whose trick is to pretend to be an evil witch, complete with fake fangs and shimmering firework effect, which is a popular fetish in the northern marches. He is told he will find Doom in Zamora — conveniently nearby. Soon he meets Subotai, a “Hyrkanian Archer” who is actually the result of a Turanian rake’s dalliance with a Zamorian dancing girl and thus has little actual Hyrkanian archery skill; and Valeria, a celebrity impersonator who turns up to parties as the famed Red Brotherhood she-pirate.

 

They soon come to the Chadizar, “city” of wickedness, a devious Zamorian noble’s attempt to divert trade from the much grander Shadizar via the confusion over the name. They learn about the Cult of Shet — not in any way affiliated with the Cult of Set –which was created by Thulsa Doom. After their slave trade failed when it emerged that for all their impressive musculature their slaves weren’t actually any use for extended labour, Doom and the LARPVanir abandon it. After a number of failed ventures, they construct a complicated and ingenious — for them — scam, promising spiritual enlightenment and happiness in exchange for worshippers’ lunas, goods and property. They are astonished to learn that it works, and soon they have hundreds of gullible idiots giving them all their possessions for empty words and fakery.

 

Soon, the Gang of Three infiltrate one of the cult’s strongholds, which is defended about as well as could be imagined for such a two-bit operation. Unfortunately, they come upon Doom’s pet snake, which he kept heavily sedated for his own safety. Somehow the half-comatose snake is a deadly threat to the three, and they are forced to kill it. They capture The Eye of the Serpent, a big piece of glass, and luckily enough the old nobleman they sell it to is as uneducated as they are in determining the value of jewelry, and he gives them an enormous sum in exchange. Eventually, they are caught by “King” Osric of Ophir, really a mad old coot whose Seneschal is a horse and whose High Constable is a sugar bowl, who managed to con himself into a modest mansion styled into a lavish castle. He tasks them with rescuing his “daughter,” really just a temple girl who caught his eye.

 

Konahn then meets Akiro, a Khitan scoundrel claiming to be a mighty wizard, who hides out at a demon-haunted set of mounds, since he is too stupid to know the danger of the place and far too confident in his powers. Soon he arrives at the Mountain of Power, a Zamorian tomb Doom happened upon, bringing his horde of empty-headed worshippers made even more empty-headed through drugs and suggestion. Konahn infiltrates the priesthood, only to be captured by Rexor and Thorgrim. After an embarrassing amount of torture and crying, Doom orders Konahn to be crucified on the Tree of Woe.

 

Dying from heat exhaustion, Konahn imagines he is being pecked at by a vulture, when in fact it is a crag martin, which he heroically decapitates with his teeth. Soon Subotai saves him, but it requires ludicrous magic and sacrifice to revive Konahn (which turns out to be smoke and mirrors by Akiro to make himself feel important.) The gang go to the Mountain of Power, and crash Doom’s orgiastic feast, just has he’s doing his “turn into a snake” routine. Thorgrim manages to collapse an ancient support column with a wayward tap, which he naturally attributes to his mighty hammer instead of the column’s state of repair. As they escape, Doom uses a hypnotised snake as an arrow to shoot Valeria. Continuing the mashup of Cimmerian/Nordic religion, Konahn burns Valeria on a pyre.

 

Doom and his cronies lead a small army of fellow Vanir enthusiasts — mostly men too stupid, sickly, ungainly or incompetent to serve in a real army — to steal back the girl. The four dispatch the army using a mix of rudimentary traps and the army’s own idiocy. Eventually, it is Rexor vs Konahn: Rexor is about to land the killing blow, when the reflection of Konahn’s replica Atlantean sword blinds him. Imagining Valeria returning to save him, Konahn is able to overcome the still half-blind Rexor, breaking his father’s poorly-made sword in the process, killing him. That night, Konahn comes to Doom. Doom attempts to hypnotise him, but Konahn is too stupid to be hypnotised, and cuts off Doom’s head with some difficulty. He hurls Doom’s head down the steps, and the Cult sheepishly starts to depart.

 

The epilogue shows a bearded Konahn seated on a throne, with Akiro’s dialogue. Then the camera zooms out a bit, and we find that Konahn is actually in a small cell in an asylum. King Conan and Publius peer through the small window. Publius remarks “It is indeed noble of you to grant asylum to such a poor deluded soul, sire! A lesser monarch would merely throw him into a dungeon to rule the rats and bones.” Conan replies “Well, can you blame him for abandoning his dull, bloodless reality and leaping into the delusion of kingship and glory? Let the man dream: what harm can he do? After all, no sane man could mistake the dotard in there for Conan the Cimmerian.”

 

But THAT… is another story!

 

DA DA DA DUN, DA-DA, DA, DA DA DA DUN, DA-DA, DA…

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Unforgiven, the final gunfight.  This is a gritty Western Hero game, so it uses heroic rules: hit locations, disabling wounds, etc.

 

 

Its raining and night time, with Sheriff "Little" Bill Daggett celebrating the shooting of hired assassin Ned Logan on display outside the store.  Enraged and fueled with cheap whiskey, William Munny walks into the room with a rifle and confronts them.

 

First phase: Munny fires at the shopkeeper Skinny, who is immobile and not dodging, he has DCV 0.  Munny aims carefully, taking a Set maneuver for +1 OCV, and fires.  The GM rules that the Spencer W. Richards 10 Gauge is wet and mistreated, so it has a 14- jam "requires skill roll" limitation and may not fire.

 

Munny pulls the trigger, rolls a 7 for the activation roll, the rifle fires, and Munny hits Skinny dealing 3d6 reduced penetration damage, hitting Skinny in the chest with a location roll of 11.  Skinny has no resistant defenses, and takes the full 11 body and 44 stun to the chest so he falls to the ground, bleeding rapidly to death and unconscious  He suffers so much stun that he recovers once per minute, and will not wake up before he bleeds out and dies.  The GM rules that he took such a catastrophic wound to the chest which is disabling and impairing, so that he dies instantly, since he's an insignificant NPC.

 

The GM rules that this is a presence attack against the crowd: Munny's 20 presence is a  4d6 base plus a very violent action +2d6, surprise for +1d6, the GM rules that Munny's line 'You'd better clear out of there" is worth +1d6, and he has a weapon of superior power to the handguns in the crowd +1d6. He rolls 31 which is 20 greater than the onlookers, resulting in hesitating a full phase, other than Bill Daggett for whom it is only 10 better, and hesitates a half phase.  He holds half a phase and gives a soliloquy, trying to inspire the crowd.

 

All right, gentlemen, he's got one barrel left. When he fires that take out your pistols and shoot him down like the mangy scoundrel he is.

 

The GM rules this as 4d6 for Daggett's natural presence, -1d6 for being at a disadvantage (under the rifle), -1d6 for being now in combat, and -1d6 for the psychological complication of the men being basically cowardly, but +2d6 for being a great soliloquy.  He rolls well, a 14, which gives the crowd +5 presence to resist another presence attack and ready themselves to shoot at Munny.

 

Here speed comes into play.  Daggett is speed 3 and Munny is speed 4, but the crowd is made up of ordinary sodbusters with 2 speed and deputies with 3 speed.  

 

Phase 3, Munny shoots his second barrel at Daggett but this time the activation roll is 15, and it jams.  The attack and failure to die is so potent that its another presence attack, which causes Daggett to hesitate a half phase and the rest of the crowd a full phase despite the earlier presence bonus.  

 

Daggett spends his held half phase pulling his pistol (remember: he does not have the Fast Draw skill as shown earlier in the film).  Phase 3, Munny throws the useless rifle at Daggett.  Munny rolls a 10 and the rifle hits Daggett.  It deals no damage, but the GM rules its a -1 penalty to his next attack because of the interference with his hands.

 

Phase 4, Daggett gets his short barrel Single Action Army .44 out, cocks, and fires at Munny, but with the penalty, rolls a 14 and misses.

 

Phase 6, Munny's higher dexterity makes him fire before all the sodbusters in the room, and he draws and fires his Starr 1888 double action revolver.  He rolls a 11, hitting Daggett, and a 12 for location: gut shot.  The 2d6-1 killing attack rolls 7 body and with the stun multiple, 35 stun.  Daggett has no resistant defenses, but gets his sizable 6 PD against the stun damage; he has 25 stun so he is knocked out and falls to the floor, but will recover his next phase.

 

Phase 8, the deputies open fire at -1 OCV after seeing their unstoppable leader shot down.  Panicking and sloppy, they fire all over the room with their 4 OCV (now 3) shooting up the place, but none of them hit William Munny.  Dagget wakes up but has 1 Stun and 1 Endurance, and his gun is lying somewhere away from him.  He lies helpless on the ground.

 

Phase 9, Munny shoots one of the deputies, dealing 6 body and 24 stun, knocking him out; he collapses to the floor but will recover next phase.

 

Phase 12, Munny shoots another deputy, this time dealing 9 body to the vitals (doubled for 18) and dealing 72 stun.  The GM rules this guy is just dead instantly.

The sodbusters panic, hiding, and some of them flee.  Most of them aren't even armed since Daggett disarms everyone that enters town.  Daggett recovers one phase.

 

Post-12 Daggett has suffered an impairing wound, and cannot get his usual post-12 recovery.  All the deputies do, and one is conscious again, but has 1 END and Stun and is lying helpless.  Daggett bleeds, having suffered 7 body he suffers an additional 2d6 of damage and rolls a 6 and a 1 for 7 stun.  This does not stop his bleeding, and he passes out again from the blood loss, and suffers an additional 1 body because he rolled a 6.

 

Phase 3, Munny holds, as the shooting has died down.

 

Phase 4, one of the deputies tries to flee out the back.  Munny uses his held phase and shoots him in the back, dealing 8 body and 32 stun to the big man, knocking him out.

 

Munny holds again, sees no living deputies.  At least one sodbuster has a weapon but is cowering behind a pillar rather than fighting the seemingly invincible Munny.

He makes a half move up to a group of cowering people, walking past the kid with the gun ignoring him, and delivers another presence attack:

 

Any man don't want to get killed better clear on out the back.

 

Combat is basically over, but the GM still rules its -1d6 and another -2d6 for being a third presence attack in a row.  However, Eastwood gains a +3d6 bonus for incredibly violent action and +2d6 for soliloquy, +1d6 for setting (striding over corpses of his enemies), and +1d6 for reputation (people think he cannot die now).  He rolls 8d6 and gets a 30.  Hit with +20 and inclined to leave anyway, the entire room cleans out except for the dead, dying, and the journalist Beauchamp who has likely wet himself again.

 

The rest isn't a fight, but Little Bill wakes up again, has his exchange about fairness and is shot in the head by Munny, and dies.  Munny picks up and checks the load in Ned's Spencer rifle.  When Munny leaves, he fires point blank into the chest of the deputy who is recovering with his pistol, then puts it away.  Then comes the post-combat presence attack as Munny ducks by the door, knowing there are men outside who might try to ambush him:

 

All right, I'm coming out. Any man I see out there I'm gonna kill him. Any SOB takes a shot at me, I'm not only going to kill him, I'm going to kill his wife and all his friends and burn his damn house down.

 

The GM rules that he has a +1d6 bonus for reputation, +3d6 incredibly violent reaction, +1d6 for targets in retreat, +1d6 for setting, +3d6 for soliloquy, and his base 4d6.  With 13d6, he rolls average for 45 which is 30 more than everyone out in town, the prairie dogs, mice, and dogs hiding under the porch and they all cringe in abject terror.  

 

Munny rides away.

 

[this would be where the video goes, but I cannot figure out how to get this forum to show videos I link]

 

I'd like to thank the Internet Movie FireArms Database for info on the weapons used, and Steve Long for the 6th edition Equipment Guide that actually had all these weapons statted out.

 

Edit: added more specific info about Daggett's wounds and bleeding, plus post-12 recovery.  Also corrected the firearm used to kill Skinny; it was not Ned's Spencer as I originally posted but a double-barreled shotgun.

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I have an idea I want to pursue in the coming months as I have time (and others should contribute as they think of battles as well) in which I break down a classic TV or movie fight scene in Hero terms.  The first one I want to do is the final confrontation in Unforgiven where Sheriff "Little" Bill Daggett dies.    Some of them are so long or complicated they're really tough to pull off in a description for a game, but there are a lot of great ones. Like the lobby scene in The Matrix or final battle between Bolo Yeung and Jean Claude Van Damme in Bloodsport.

 

What are some other film scenes that would be fun or interesting to do?

 

Unforgiven is great.

 

 

 

For purposes of this, Clint Eastwood and Gene Hackman are playing characters who are on the higher end of normal human Dex and Speed.  Probably something like 18 Dex and 4 Spd.  Virtually everyone else is a 10 Dex 2 Speed normal.  Not everything matches up exactly second-by-second with the Hero Speed Chart, but I tried to keep it as close as possible.

 

Starting 1 minute into the video, we're in noncombat time.  Little Bill is making a PS: Law Enforcement roll, and instructing his followers on what the plan is, and he probably intends on following that up with an Oratory roll, or maybe Persuasion to get everyone excited about the fugitive hunt the next morning.  Clint Eastwood quietly walks into the saloon, but nobody notices because they're all looking at Little Bill.

 

Gradually, people start to make their Perception rolls and they see Clint's character standing there.

 

1:11 -- Clint Eastwood cocks the hammer of his shotgun.  This is basically a long, drawn out Presence attack.  It is extended in time for dramatic effect.  It gets everyone's attention and most of the people in the saloon are intimidated.  We hear a clap of thunder in the background.  Clint points his shotgun around the room, getting a few extra D6 for his intimidating action.  The combination of the surprise from his sudden appearance, to the fact that he's got a reputation as known murderer William Munny, to the fact that he's got his guns out and they don't, and the fact that he took Little Bill completely by surprise, gives him a ton of bonus dice.  He gets 30 past on basically everyone, and they're all at 0 DCV and have lost their next action.  They are also deeply considering any order that Munny gives them.

 

1:55 -- Munny uses the Cover maneuver on the saloon owner.  He makes a to-hit roll, is successful, and now he can blast the guy without even rolling.  This is still in non-combat time, and no one else has taken any action yet.  In fact, they've all still lost their next action because of Munny's PRE attack.

 

2:03 -- Little Bill realizes what is about to happen, and makes an Ego roll.  While the GM has been lenient with allowing Munny to roleplay out the Presence attack (now at almost a minute in length) to really set the tone for the final fight, he tells the player that he better hurry up, Little Bill has made an Ego roll and is going to get his action back if he doesn't do something.

 

2:05 -- Munny uses his held action and shoots the saloon owner.  Having used the Cover maneuver, he doesn't have to roll to-hit.  He just rolls damage.  This announces the beginning of Phase 12.  Everyone else has lost their action.

 

2:10 -- Phase 3 or 4, Little Bill's action is about to come up.  He starts to reach for his gun.  William Munny, however, beats him at a Dex roll-off.  He uses the Cover maneuver on Little Bill, and Little Bill knows it.  Little Bill stops reaching for his weapon.  Everyone else is too intimidated to do anything.

 

2:15 -- Little Bill decides to try a PRE attack of his own, to try and intimidate Munny.  He also hopes to inspire the men around him, so they'll do something.  But Munny has all the advantages here.  Little Bill loses a D6 for being at a disadvantage, and another because the attack goes against the prevailing mood.  He gets minimal amounts on the attack and nobody is inspired.

 

2:34 -- Little Bill's PRE attack fails and William Munny makes one in turn.  He talks about murdering women and children.  Everyone in the saloon who is not Little Bill is scared out of their pants.

 

3:08 -- Little Bill makes an Ego roll to act all brave and tough, and tries for another Oratory roll to inspire the people in the room.  "He's got one barrel left."  The GM decides to wait to roll the results of Oratory until after Munny rolls damage.

 

3:29 -- Munny fails his activation roll on his shotgun.  It's a misfire.  This might be an activation roll, it might be Unluck, it might be Luck on the part of Little Bill.  Bill gets a large bonus on his Oratory roll and succeeds in jarring some of his deputies out of their panic.

 

3:35 to 3:38 -- Segment 12 (again)  Everyone slowly realizes that combat is about to begin again.  Many of them immediately abort to dive for cover.  Little Bill goes for his gun and struggles with it.  He appears to fail a Fast Draw roll because he can't get the gun out.  Munny throws his shotgun at Little Bill to distract him.  This is the special effect of his Dodge.  Bill finally gets his gun drawn, but it takes the whole phase.

 

3:40/3:41 -- Segment 3.  Little Bill wins the Dex roll-off and fires.  William Munny hasn't acted yet so he still has his Dodge bonus from Segment 12, and maybe some levels in DCV.  Little Bill misses.  Munny's action comes up an instant later and he shoots Little Bill.  He does good damage and gets enough Stun to knock Little Bill out until the end of the fight.

 

3:43 -- Segment 6.  There's a gunshot from somewhere that doesn't hit anything.  Munny shoots a deputy, then at 3:45 turns and shoots another one before he could act.  This is probably the Rapid Attack maneuver.

 

3:46 -- Still Segment 6,  Two deputies demonstrate their complete lack of Weapon Familiarity (-3 to hit) by blowing several holes in the bar.  Their OCVs are not very good, and they completely miss the almost stationary (and low DCV due to Rapid Attack) Munny.  They also fire a lot, so it may be that they're trying to Rapid Attack Munny and they kill their OCV in the process.

 

3:49 -- Munny uses another Rapid Attack and shoots the two deputies.

 

At this point, everyone else in the saloon decide to break and run.  You have several phases of people trying to make Perception rolls in the gunsmoke-filled, dark room because they don't want to get shot.

 

3:59 -- Deputy Porkins uses his 3" of Running to try and run out the back of the bar, which is more than 3" away.

 

4:00 -- Munny's phase, he shoots Deputy Porkins in the back.

 

 

The fight is now over, you just have Munny ordering everyone out of the saloon, and then he shoots a just-regaining consciousness Little Bill a while later.  Note that earlier in the movie, there's a scene where Little Bill is talking to the writer guy, and he tells him that being fast doesn't mean a whole lot.  He'd rather face a fast guy who doesn't aim than a calm guy who takes his time and hits what he shoots at.  The danger is, if the fast guy gets lucky, then you're dead.  This battle basically plays that out.  William Munny doesn't rush his shots, he's cold and calm.  The message is that blazing away (which the deputies try to do) is difficult.

 

You're probably looking at a game where the deputies don't have any combat levels at all, and some probably don't even really have weapon familiarity.  They might know how to shoot a gun at a target, but not really in combat.  Munny and Little Bill are the only two competent ones, and Munny kills Bill first.

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Unforgiven, the final gunfight.  This is a gritty Western Hero game, so it uses heroic rules: hit locations, disabling wounds, etc.

 

Its raining and night time, with Sheriff "Little" Bill Daggett celebrating the shooting of hired assassin Ned Logan on display outside the store.  Enraged and fueled with cheap whiskey, William Munny walks into the room with a rifle and confronts them.

 

First phase: Munny fires at the shopkeeper Skinny, who is immobile and not dodging, he has DCV 0.  Munny aims carefully, taking a Set maneuver for +1 OCV, and fires.  The GM rules that the Spencer 1860 Saddle Ring Carbine is wet and mistreated, so it has a 14- jam "requires skill roll" limitation and may not fire.

 

Munny pulls the trigger, rolls a 7 for the activation roll, the rifle fires, and Munny hits Skinny dealing 2d6+1 damage, hitting Skinny in the chest with a location roll of 11.  Skinny has no resistant defenses, and takes the full 11 body and 33 stun to the chest so he falls to the ground, bleeding rapidly to death and unconscious  He suffers so much stun that he recovers once per minute, and will not wake up before he bleeds out and dies.  The GM rules that he took such a catastrophic wound to the chest which is disabling and impairing, so that he dies instantly, since he's an insignificant NPC.

 

The GM rules that this is a presence attack against the crowd: Munny's 20 presence is a  4d6 base plus a very violent action +2d6, surprise for +1d6, the GM rules that Munny's line 'You'd better clear out of there" is worth +1d6, and he has a weapon of superior power to the handguns in the crowd +1d6. He rolls 31 which is 20 greater than the onlookers, resulting in hesitating a full phase, other than Bill Daggett for whom it is only 10 better, and hesitates a half phase.  He holds half a phase and gives a soliloquy, trying to inspire the crowd.

 

All right, gentlemen, he's got one barrel left. When he fires that take out your pistols and shoot him down like the mangy scoundrel he is.

 

The GM rules this as 4d6 for Daggett's natural presence, -1d6 for being at a disadvantage (under the rifle), -1d6 for being now in combat, and -1d6 for the psychological complication of the men being basically cowardly, but +2d6 for being a great soliloquy.  He rolls well, a 14, which gives the crowd +5 presence to resist another presence attack and ready themselves to shoot at Munny.

 

Here speed comes into play.  Daggett is speed 3 and Munny is speed 4, but the crowd is made up of ordinary sodbusters with 2 speed and deputies with 3 speed.  

 

Phase 3, Munny shoots at Daggett but this time the activation roll is 15, and it jams.  The attack and failure to die is so potent that its another presence attack, which causes Daggett to hesitate a half phase and the rest of the crowd a full phase despite the earlier presence bonus.  

 

Daggett spends his held half phase pulling his pistol (remember: he does not have the Fast Draw skill as shown earlier in the film).  Phase 3, Munny throws the useless rifle at Daggett.  Munny rolls a 10 and the rifle hits Daggett.  It deals no damage, but the GM rules its a -1 penalty to his next attack because of the interference with his hands.

 

Phase 4, Daggett gets his short barrel Single Action Army .44 out, cocks, and fires at Munny, but with the penalty, rolls a 14 and misses.

 

Phase 6, Munny's higher dexterity makes him fire before all the sodbusters in the room, and he draws and fires his Starr 1888 double action revolver.  He rolls a 11, hitting Daggett, and a 12 for location: gut shot.  The 2d6-1 killing attack rolls 7 body and with the stun multiple, 35 stun.  Daggett has no resistant defenses, but gets his sizable 6 PD against the stun damage; he has 25 stun so he is knocked out and falls to the floor, but will recover his next phase.

 

Phase 8, the deputies open fire at -1 OCV after seeing their unstoppable leader shot down.  Panicking and sloppy, they fire all over the room with their 4 OCV (now 3) shooting up the place, but none of them hit William Munny.

 

Phase 9, Munny shoots one of the deputies, dealing 6 body and 24 stun, knocking him out; he collapses to the floor but will recover next phase.

 

Phase 12, Munny shoots another deputy, this time dealing 9 body to the vitals (doubled for 18) and dealing 72 stun.  The GM rules this guy is just dead instantly.

The sodbusters panic, hiding, and some of them flee.  Most of them aren't even armed since Daggett disarms everyone that enters town.

 

Phase 3, Munny holds, as the shooting has died down.

 

Phase 4, one of the deputies tries to flee out the back.  Munny uses his held phase and shoots him in the back, dealing 8 body and 32 stun to the big man, knocking him out.

 

Munny holds again, sees no living deputies.  At least one sodbuster has a weapon but is cowering behind a pillar rather than fighting the seemingly invincible Munny.

He makes a half move up to a group of cowering people, walking past the kid with the gun ignoring him, and delivers another presence attack:

 

Any man don't want to get killed better clear on out the back.

 

Combat is basically over, but the GM still rules its -1d6 and another -2d6 for being a third presence attack in a row.  However, Eastwood gains a +3d6 bonus for incredibly violent action and +2d6 for soliloquy, +1d6 for setting (striding over corpses of his enemies), and +1d6 for reputation (people think he cannot die now).  He rolls 8d6 and gets a 30.  Hit with +20 and inclined to leave anyway, the entire room cleans out except for the dead, dying, and the journalist Beauchamp who has likely wet himself again.

 

The rest isn't a fight, but Little Bill wakes up, has his exchange about fairness and is shot in the head by Munny, and dies.  Munny unjams, then reloads the rifle.  When Munny leaves, he fires point blank into the chest of the deputy who is recovering with his pistol, then puts it away.  Then comes the post-combat presence attack as Munny ducks by the door, knowing there are men outside who might try to ambush him:

 

All right, I'm coming out. Any man I see out there I'm gonna kill him. Any SOB takes a shot at me, I'm not only going to kill him, I'm going to kill his wife and all his friends and burn his damn house down.

 

The GM rules that he has a +1d6 bonus for reputation, +3d6 incredibly violent reaction, +1d6 for targets in retreat, +1d6 for setting, +3d6 for soliloquy, and his base 4d6.  With 13d6, he rolls average for 45 which is 30 more than everyone out in town, the prairie dogs, mice, and dogs hiding under the porch and they all cringe in abject terror.  

 

Munny rides away.

 

[this would be where the video goes, but I cannot figure out how to get this forum to show videos I link]

 

I'd like to thank the Internet Movie FireArms Database for info on the weapons used, and Steve Long for the 6th edition Equipment Guide that actually had all these weapons statted out.

 

Great analysis. :)

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Massey: Was it Rapid attack or Multiple attack? 

 

I thought Rapid attack was a skill which let's one Multiple Attack as a half-phase action. The action is a Multiple Attack, though.. 

 

They've changed the name a few times, I think.  Rapid Fire is the name of the maneuver in 5th.  Rapid Attack is the skill.  In 6th, who knows?

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From the first post in my thread John Wick for 6e:

0 3) Multiple Attack (Free Maneuver) (Custom Adder)
[Notes: Multiple Attack requires a Full Phase to use (the Rapid Attack Skill, 6E1 87, reduces this to a Half Phase). Using it reduces the character to ½ DCV. The character’s OCV is affected by the number of targets, the types of attacks used, and other factors (see below). A character using Multiple Attack has to make a separate Attack Roll for each attack in the sequence. If he misses any of his Attack Rolls, all remaining attacks in that Multiple Attack sequence automatically miss also. A character making a Multiple Attack must expend END or Charges for each attack made (this includes any that automatically miss because he missed one in the sequence). He may elect to stop the Multiple Attack after any successful attack. This does not retroactively diminish the OCV and DCV penalties for using the Maneuver, but it saves END or Charges. A character making a Multiple Attack against multiple targets can choose to attack some or all of them more than once, but this of course increases the number of attacks (and thus the OCV penalty suffered; see below). For example, Thunderbird could make a Multiple Attack with his pistol by shooting Lazer once, Mechassassin twice, and Steel Commando once. That’s a total of four attacks, so he suffers a -6 OCV penalty on all the Attack Rolls.]
10 4) Rapid Attack
[Notes: A character with this Combat Skill has a heightened ability to move in combat. He can make a Multiple Attack (6E2 73) as a Half Phase Action, instead of a Full Phase Action. (This includes Multiple Attacks made with the Two-Weapon Fighting Skill.) No roll is required, and all other Multiple Attack penalties and rules apply.]

 

5 2) Rapid Autofire
[Notes: A character with this Skill may use Autofire attacks with the Combat Maneuver Multiple Attack (see 6E2 73). He must fire the same number of shots in each burst of Multiple Attack Autofire (i.e., if he fires 3 shots at his first target, he must fire 3 shots at all targets, even if his Autofire could fire up to 5 shots). He suffers Multiple Attack’s cumulative -2 OCV penalty for each burst of Autofire fired after the first, in addition to any standard Autofire penalties.]

 

:)

HM

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