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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/05/2019 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Starlord

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Let's be fair here, Man of Steel has a heart-warming scene where Supes saves millions of acres of cornfields and dirt by deliberately dragging the battle into the center of Smallville.
  2. 5 points
    massey

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    I don't blame Superman for killing Zod. He didn't have a choice. I do blame Zack Snyder for making a Superman movie where protecting civilians is not a priority. I said earlier, Marvel's heroes all have a body count. I mean, dear God, Iron Man gave a teenage kid a suit with an "instant kill" option. He's definitely got the irresponsible uncle role down. Tony kills I don't know how many terrorists in the first movie. Now these are all bad guys who are getting killed, and the heroes all make a dedicated effort to save innocent people. And the only person who is portrayed as any sort of moral paragon is Cap. Thor is awesome, but he's not exactly a role model in our modern society. Captain America is a soldier, and we all accept that killing Nazis in WW2 is okay. Then in Winter Soldier, he's kind of a James Bond superspy, going on missions for what he thinks is a good cause serving his country. But Cap goes out of his way in Civil War to avoid killing any of the cops who are going after Bucky. Superman is a different character altogether. As far as moral symbols, he and Cap are similar. But Cap has always been willing to kill, if he had to. His powers are more limited, and often he doesn't have the choice. Superman's powers mean that he almost always has the option to not kill. If he had spent the entire movie saving civilians, and then he had to snap Zod's neck at the end, we'd have more sympathy. As it was, he had just had a brawl where tens of thousands (maybe hundreds of thousands) of people would have died, and then he's sad because he had to kill the villain? It didn't feel right.
  3. 5 points
    Old Man

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Exactly this. Even though the Marvel universe has always been grayer than DC, the MCU films stressed the importance of protecting innocents to the point where it was literally the central catalyst for at least two of the films (AoU and Civil War). Whereas the Snyderverse took one character who is consistently written as protecting innocents and made him seem indifferent at best to the collateral damage he caused, and took another who specifically refuses to use guns and won't even blow up ducks and turned him into a machinegun-wielding hardcore vigilante. In fact off the top of my head: Avengers I: During the Battle of New York, Cap's entire focus is protecting bystanders from collateral damage. Iron Man risks his life to save the city from a nuke fired by Hydra. Avengers AoU: Stark creates a suit whose entire purpose is to stop Hulk from rampaging in a city. Hawkeye directs the evacuation onto the helicarrier and sacrifices himself to save Sokovian citizens from machine gun fire. Stark and Thor risk their lives to blow up Sokovia preventing it from killing uncounted civilians. Avengers IW: Quill lets his own anger get in the way of saving the universe, and audiences hate him for it. Thor: Thor finally gets motivation when he sees Destroyer defeat the Warriors Three and come for the diner and its mortal occupants. Thor Ragnarok: The last half of this film is Thor & Co. saving Asgardian civilians from Hela. Captain America: Cap deliberately crashes the Hydra plane to prevent its weapons from being used against American cities. Iron Man 2: Stark refuses to sell suits to the DoD. Spider Man: Homecoming: Washington Monument, Staten Island ferry. Doctor Strange: Protecting Earth is literally his entire job. Black Panther: By the end of the film T'Challa has saved the world from the Wakandan military and has taken a more active role in protecting civilians worldwide. Tl;dr: The protection of civilians is a constant thread throughout the MCU. In the DCEU prior to WW, it's... not a priority.
  4. 5 points
    Lord Liaden

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    A large part of that was my fault, for which I apologize. So let me see if I can get it back on track, with an observation raised by massey: That could be. It's certainly what was on my mind when I saw that now-infamous scene. But it might also have to do with the way most people have come to learn about these characters. Superman and Batman in particular have had the highest profile among non-comics readers due to previous movies; and their principles against killing are probably well established in the cultural zeitgeist. OTOH the majority of people were introduced to Marvel's heroes as presented in the MCU. Tony Stark was an arms manufacturer, and was shown killing recognizably bad people in his first movie. Steve Rogers was a soldier during war time. Thor was a warrior from a warrior culture. Hulk was a raging but innocent monster. Black Widow and Hawkeye were literal professional assassins. The standards established for them in those appearances didn't include unwillingness to kill. OTOH the MCU heroes have repeatedly been depicted going out of their way to protect innocent civilians, something the DCEU heroes had generally neglected, at least in their first few movies. That has reinforced the impression that the Marvel crew don't treat life lightly.
  5. 4 points
    massey

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    This post is going to creep a little bit towards politics, but I'll try to keep it non-controversial. In the first Iron Man movie, Tony Stark is basically Mr Super-Republican. Remember it's 2008, we're at war in Iraq and Afghanistan, and things aren't going great. Now here comes this billionaire arms-dealer, a walking poster board for the second amendment, who goes overseas and fixes things. Can't find Osama bin Laden? Tony Stark can. He's just going to fly over to Iraqistan and blow away the bad guys. Yeah he has his awakening where he decides that selling weapons is a bad thing, and dedicates his life to world peace, but he's gonna start that process by killing people we don't like. That movie really fit the mood of the country, where we just wanted to go over there and smash somebody and make it okay again. John Wayne killed people in his movies. Most of those were post-WWII and up through early Vietnam. Yeah, they were cowboy movies, but they were also war movies. Even if he's playing a cowboy, he's also basically a symbol of mid-20th century America. Even if he's literally fighting the Comanche, he's also symbolically fighting the Cold War. After John Wayne died, Schwarzenegger filled that role. It didn't matter if he was fighting aliens in the jungle or teaching kindergarten, those were basically war movies. In the MCU, that role is shared by Iron Man and Captain America. Tony Stark represents America's might, and Cap represents America's ideals. And just like John Wayne's movies or Schwarzenegger's movies, most of the MCU films are symbolically still about war and America's place in the world. They're about responsible use of power and what happens when we screw up. There's a whole big layer of meaning to the MCU, and I'm not sure it was 100% intentional. Maybe partially intentional and mostly it's just a factor of how good movies reflect the times in which they were made. Captain America is a superhero, but he's also the Navy sniper who shot those pirates who had seized that boat (exactly what I thought of in that Winter Soldier scene). Iron Man is a superhero, but he's also the pilot who drops a smart bomb, or the SEAL team who fly in a stealth helicopter and kill bin Laden. Superman isn't any of those things. Superman is, as zslane said, a Jesus metaphor. He's ultra powerful, he's really really nice, and he watches over us. And we don't really like the idea of Jesus snapping people's necks.
  6. 4 points
    zslane

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    I agree, on the whole, but I have always kinda felt that the extra effort Joss Whedon went to to show the Avengers protecting civilians in Sokovia while it was being ravaged by Ultron was a direct commentary on Superman's complete disregard for civilian casualties in Man of Steel. It was as if Feige and Whedon very much wanted you to know that their heroes cared about civilians in a way that Snyder's god-hero did not.
  7. 2 points
    Cancer

    On This Day in History

    In a couple of hours, it will be June 6 by Universal Time: 75th Anniversary of the Allied landings in Normandy. Fewer and fewer of the participants are still with us as time goes by, but let us never forget any of them.
  8. 2 points
    I'm quoting this simply because it's so quotable.
  9. 2 points
    zslane

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    I would also point out that Thor is, more or less, a warrior god, not a walking metaphor for Jesus. He is accustomed to killing his enemies, and I doubt he ever faced an enemy so daunting and so deserving of death (in his eyes) than Thanos. MCU Thor is quite a bit more nuanced than classic 616 Silver Age Thor. Killing Thanos was not out of character in my view, and if doing so shocked audiences it is probably because they were projecting a kinder, gentler version of Thor--the Thor they wanted him to be rather than the Thor he actually was--onto the character. Thor: Ragnarok may have added a much-needed facet of humor to the character, but it did not turn him into a cuddly teddy bear incapable of ruthless, vengeful action.
  10. 2 points
    Steve

    Be At Ease Campaign Arcs

    Incident #3 (continued) Beretta Colt: Be a good girl?! Don't say anything?! I'm covered in (bleep)-ing blood and gore! Again!! Why does this (bleep)-ing (bleep) keep happening to me?!! I thought I left all this (bleep) behind in college! That guy has (bleep)-ing fangs! He almost tore out my throat before I got a hold of my dad's gun and emptied it into him! Section M agent: (sighs) All right, Ms. Colt. I guess, given your history having to forcibly deal with several such events head-on, you've earned the truth. You might want to sit down for this... I could understand her being a trouble magnet. Maybe I should revise her Complications somehow? A Hunted of some kind? A Social Complication?
  11. 2 points
    RDU Neil

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    It is not the act but the context... and you were supposed to be shocked by the act. It was not played for smirking good times. It was a moment of defeat for Thor, which played out in the rest of the movie, not a feel good "show the dude bro being KEWL!" moment. Thematic context matters a lot.
  12. 2 points
    Let's say that Hero decided to start in that direction. They could start by publishing a combined rulebook and genre book, like 4th edition Champions. It gives people Viper agents, a villain team, about a dozen individual villains, and a master villain like Mechanon. It also gives a starting hero team and some basic ideas on superhero adventures, as well as info on Delta City or something, wherever you've got your campaigns set. You also publish a Classic Enemies/CKC villain book with like 50 different bad guys to use. This is your standard Players Handbook/Monster Manual that most people will buy. It's kind of expected at this point. But then, then let's say you start 3 different adventure modules, based around 3 different teams. So you've got maybe X-Men, Teen Titans, and Fantastic Four. The first module gives character sheets for our heroes, and campaign guidelines if players want to use their own. And each module has like a dozen adventures (one game a week for 3 months) for these characters. And once every quarter, you release a new module. You could go for a year, or a year and a half (or however long you want), taking these characters through the equivalent of one writer's time on a comic book. So it would be sort of like John Byrne's run on Superman, or Walt Simonson's run on Thor. You've got a certain set of plots and supporting characters that the author likes, and villains who will show up, but it's a defined period of the characters' history. Each new module shows how the characters have spent their XP and gives updated character sheets. It also obviously includes new villains and NPCs that will be appearing in the next three months worth of adventures. So you've got like 3 different teams of characters for a new group of players to select from. And you'll have 3 different storylines that you'll develop over the next year or two. Then, once you complete one of those stories, you can publish a sourcebook that brings everybody up to date. So let's say your X-Men analog have been operating in the Pacific Northwest city of Seacouver. You could make an X-Men sourcebook that details what it's like, who the villains are, and just sort of a general update for people who didn't play through the modules. It gives character sheets for the heroes that would more or less match up with their final versions from the modules (it doesn't have to be exactly the same -- there's a new writer on that comic now, after all). And maybe some characters or organizations who were mentioned in the module get fleshed out a little better here. Then, you start with a new series of modules. New characters in a different part of the world. Maybe now you have Hudson City Vigilantes (Batman Family plus Spidey plus Cloak and Dagger), Avengers West Coast (standard adult supers), and a comedy one (🎵Rorschach and Deadpool...🎶). Sort of different genres within the broader superhero category. If something became really popular, like say maybe your X-Men adventures sold really well, you could always revisit them a little later with a new adventure module. Characters don't have to stay static. Just because Wolverine ended the last module at 537 points, that doesn't mean that he's at least that level in your new module. Maybe he's been hanging out in bars instead of training, or his powers are fluctuating, or whatever. In one adventure maybe he traveled into outer space and hung out with aliens, and that character sheet included Language: Klingon and +2 OCV with disintegrators. That doesn't mean it needs to be on his character sheet now that he's on a mission to rescue mutant POWs from some southeast asian country. I think something like this would let you flesh out your superhero world in an organic and interesting way. People might actually care when you publish the stats for some superhero team. The Tiger Squad would be somebody who was introduced in a planned way, and not just like "oh yeah, here are some dudes from China that you might use if you can come up with anything". Anyway, this post was kind of stream of consciousness, but nobody is really doing any kind of real continuity with superhero rpgs.
  13. 2 points
    Steve

    Be At Ease Campaign Arcs

    I could imagine something like that happened with Beretta in her origin story. Incident #1, Section M agent: No, those weren't really zombies, Ms. Colt. They were actually the unfortunate victims of a bioterrorism incident that the government would prefer you keep quiet about due to national security concerns. Incident #2, Section M agent: Magic? Aztec curses? Come now, Ms. Colt. Your ex-boyfriend was actually doped to the gills on a mix of PCP, steroids and amphetamines that we found in his apartment when we searched it. That's why he was able to ignore being thrown off the roof of a three-story building, getting hit across the face with a crowbar and being shot twice in the chest at point-blank range with the .38 revolver your fiancé was using before he was murdered. The bullets that went through your ex's body must have somehow managed to miss his vital organs. You don't want to sound like a crazy person and keep talking about cursed knives, now do you? Incident #3, Section M agent: There are no such things as vampires, Ms. Colt. Beretta Colt: That's the best you've got? You were far more eloquent in our past encounters. Section M agent: It's been a very long night, Ms. Colt. So just be a good girl and don't talk about this incident, for your own safety.
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    Duke Bushido

    Complex Attack Power Help

    Thanks, Amigo. Yes indeed. #2 is unnecessary, unless you just want to be able to bounce of sheets of glad wrap or something like that.
  16. 2 points
    Duke Bushido

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

    Yeah, it's an old one, but I always liked it. It's my second-favorite, actually. My first choice will always and forever be:
  17. 1 point
    A new Here There Be Monsters character...dubbed "old lady Cthulhu face" by a certain player, a creepy possible addition to a party of Monster Hunters. Melissa is descended from one of the various Elder Thing tainted bloodlines. She physically appears normal from the outside (most of the time), but an autopsy would reveal that her physiology is inhuman and disturbing. Those with supernatural senses also recognize her as being of Elder Thing origins. From a practical perspective she is incredibly durable, not invulnerable but very difficult to injure, and her mind and body are resistant to external manipulation. When her true nature is revelead, one or more high-tensile strength tentacles can emerge from her body, primarily from her mouth. This effect is disturbing, and causes psychological damage to many who observe it. http://www.killershrike.com/HereThereBeMonsters/Characters/GMsVault/Killer Shrike/Melissa McBrien.HTML
  18. 1 point
    The Children of the Gods: Since we are doing the World Creation Draft next month and we did the adopted children of the UA at the start of the year, I thought what would happen if we combined the two for a month. We've already done a draft like this, but I couldn't find it with the search. Here's the premise in a nutshell. Various planes of existences have been disrupted. Pantheons of gods and their supporters have gone to war with the menace from beyond order and defeated it at a cost. Their numbers have been depleted and their responsibilities are threatening to sink Reality under the strain. Something has to be done. After much argument, it was decreed that the surviving gods and goddesses would produce heirs to take up the dead gods' mantles. But something wants to stop them. The first pick is the location of the pantheon. This is where your children are being raised and guarded. The next fifteen picks are five days of three picks apiece. One pick is the god/goddess, the second is the mortal mate/SO, the third is the offspring. You have three option picks for weapons of the gods, various menaces, so forth You have one option for a villain/god of evil that threatens your children. You can mix and match pantheons so that Apollo's, Huang's, and Thor's children are being raised together. Please do not pick real people. As usual Power Girl and Supergirl are separate people and once you pick one version of that person all alternates are off the table. Any god that is not picked for the draft is considered dead and his sphere of influence needing to be filled to relieve the multiverse. The draft starts on Wednesday at 5pm Eastern Standard. So roughly 36 hours from right now CES
  19. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Origins, practice, and recaps

    ---------------------------------------------------- It would be weeks before the world knew that it lost Martin Power. To this day, science cannot say with any certainty just where it was that he was lost. Martin Power, via the agent Vagabond, had been recruited to assist the Frontier Corps in a search and rescue mission through the Freightgate for a gateship that was nearly six weeks overdue. The hope was that the men would be found somewhere along their planned route and returned home safely. After all, the supplies and support systems of the Gateships were sufficient for nearly nine months of life on board, and the men had only been gone for four. There was a fear, however, that perhaps they had fallen victim to a catastrophic accident, or the Vland, or perhaps the intergalactic scene had changed far more than expected over the past months and humans were no longer welcome amongst the stars. Martin Power was known amongst the aliens nearly as well as he was known to humanity, and was known in particular as the being that almost single-handedly dismantled the entire Vlandthii war machine. The threat of his power, felt the decision-makers, may be invaluable. Of course, there was also the threat that should the need arise, he could do it again. As an author, I wish I could tell you a grand tale of adventure and danger, but I really can't. Most of the documents have, at the time of this writing, not been declassified. I can't tell you where they were or how they got there, simply because I don't know. I have interviewed some of the survivors, and most of them do not really know, either. Those that do are soldiers and agents, and are unable to speak about the events outside of that which is declassified. It saddens me, because given the spectacular life of Martin Power, I feel his death deserves to be something of equally heroic proportions. Something inside me wants to believe that he died an honorable, heroic death. Given all he had ever done for us, he deserves nothing less. However, I feel it would be equally disrespectful to embellish the few facts available. The Gateship was crippled. It had been adrift on its own momentum for four days, drives completely inoperable and, with the crew and materials at hand, irreparable. Perhaps "under its own momentum" is misleading. Gateships use the gravitic drive, which, in ways the author doesn't fully understand, do not impart true momentum. It would be more accurate, according to those who understand the physics far better than do I, to say the ship was riding a current composed of little more than solar winds and exaggerated Brownian motion-- crawling along no faster than if it were a car on a freeway. The Freightgates themselves do the biggest part of the lifting. As a Gateship moves under traditional drive through the Gate, the multi-dimenionsal interactions of the gravitic forces bend and twist the universe, but only in the theoretical spaces. The Gate then compresses the ship through those theoretical spaces, and pulls it up through a different one, unimaginable distances away. Gravitic drives are used to span the vast distances between Gates and destinations, but they cannot be used near a gravity well; they will simply cease to function. As the movement created by the gravitic drive is without momentum, when the drive ceases to function, the ship stops moving save as it is caused to move by more conventional methods. Thus, the Sub-C drive is used for final approaches through solar systems, toward ports, etc. This is typically the longest part of the trip, and this is all done, as the name suggests, well below relativistic speeds. In the case of the rescue ship, the stranded spacers had been found. The Gate that served as the exit point for the lost ship-- the very same one through which the rescue ship had traveled-- had shifted (perhaps sabotage during the war? Perhaps natural forces?) and deposited the ship directly into a gravity well. Moreover, it deposited them on the opposite side of the star from the Gate-- a phenomenon that was completely unheard of. The crew of the lost ship would have to use the C-drive to return through the Gate, but the Gate itself had made this impossible: it had pulled them back into normal space directly in the path of a solar flare that, while leaving most of the ship in tact, had fried nearly every control circuit on the ship. The rescue operation had been a success; the missing ship had been found and the spacers brought aboard. Unfortunately, that meant that the rescue ship was now overmanned. The life support was strained, but functional, and the captain estimated that from their current position it would take no more than eight weeks to get to the Gate and back to Earth.Thus, they were attempting to make their way by Sub-C drive across the plane of the sun's spin and toward the Gate, whereupon they could jump directly to Jupiter Base. Estimates suggested that they would spend about a half-month longer than they had supplies. Then the Sub-C drive had gone. No explanation, save that it had simply ceased to work. The technicians were baffled. The Sub-C, like so much of the other alien technology, was powered by refined gravitic ore, but in this case, it was used as as an energy source, and not to actually warp space. As best anyone could determine, the ore had simply "denatured," much the way that isotopes will eventually lose their radioactive charge. Computer records showed nothing of the sort ever happening before, and suggested that once refined, the G-ore had a half-life measured in hundreds of thousands of years. There had to be an environmental cause for the problem, but no amount of probing shed any light into it. The ship was adrift, riding its momentum and the solar winds, betting them against the gravity well of the distant sun, which was already robbing them of momentum. Making matters worse, the course of the ship was taking it directly into the path of a derelict ship-- a skeletal hulk left over perhaps from the war. or possibly damaged by whatever fluke of physics so radically altered the performance of this particular Gate. The hulk, destroyed beyond salvage, had been left in a terminal orbit around a small planetoid and abandoned. With no way to turn or even stop the Gateship, there was no way to avoid a collision. The crew had run several scenarios, and finally decided to deploy the lifeboats and make landfall on the planetoid. Martin Power had a different idea. He knew that the lifeboats did not have the capacity to keep them alive more than six weeks, and he knew that the only communication equipment they carried was a simple homing and identity beacon. He felt that the odds were better with the shuttle. The crew protested that the shuttle had no capacity for the entire crew, and was little more than a cockpit and a skeletal frame to which cargo pods could be mounted. Besides that, the lifeboats were fired by chemical propulsion, and whatever malady had laid waste to the Gateship's drive had done equal damage to the shuttle's own drive. "Once those boats hit the surface, you can start digging your own graves. The collision will eliminate any value of this ship, and you won't have a way back to it anyway unless you're going to trust me to throw you at it." "That," replied Vagabond, casually, "was part of a possible salvage mission. The planetoid is very small, and has, relative to your strength, an inconsequential measure of gravity and absolutely no atmosphere. You shouldn't have too much trouble making the throw." "I agree. And that's why I have a better idea." This time, the captain spoke. "What problems do you have with escaping in the lifeboats, Mr. Power?" "It's a dead end. Even salvage won't help, because we'll be stuck on a very tiny rock with no communication, and the thing any rescue mission will be looking for-- the Gateship-- will be destroyed. The best thing to come out of this collision is going to be a pair of hulks in orbit, both of them looking like old war junk. Nothing to make anyone come looking for us." "And what do you propose?" "We have power, and we have life support. We even have propulsion for something no bigger than the shuttle is." "We do?" "Yes. Me." The assembly of men in the room took a moment to drink in what he was saying. Finally, the captain spoke again. "Mr. Power, it is extremely noble of you to offer yourself up to sacrifice. However, I cannot-- I _will_ not-- allow any such action on my watch. So long as we all live, we all have a chance." "There's something I am going to tell _you_, Captain, and only once, because as soon as I've said my piece, I have to get busy." Martin started, respectful but firm. He raised a finger toward the door closed behind them. "That group of scientists out there? There are a couple of VIPs mixed in there." "Then I am doubly-determined that we will stay together, all of us alive." "One of them is my sister. Hey; I didn't know it either, and I don't really know how she did it, but I saw her two nights ago. The hot-bunking is keeping us all in the halls at odd hours." "Mr. Power, I am very sorry that she had to be on this parti--" "Don’t be. She’s not in any danger, because I'm getting her home. Don't think I'm not. I've already got an idea, and I'm doing it with or without the rest of you. I won't force you to go along with my idea. If the rest of you still want to take your chances on the ground in the middle of nowhere, without food or air, I won't stop you. But I am getting my sister home. I am inviting the rest of you along for the ride, if you want it." After a good deal of thought, the captain began to get interested. "Tell us more about your plan, Mr. Power." It was rather simple, which in this case worked to their advantage. They had nine days before collision. The idea was that the support pods of the lifeboats would be fitted into the cargo frame of the shuttle and secured. All the life support equipment that could be gutted from the rescue ship and made to work for the home made rescue boat would be fitted, as would every scrap of ration and even the unused oxygen tanks for the torches. Martin himself would literally throw the shuttle back in the direction of the Freightgate. if the work was completed fast enough, before the gravity well of the star robbed them of much more momentum, the shuttle should drift through the Gate in roughly sixteen weeks, at which point the entire Earth solar system could hear their distress calls.. Just in case, the ship would still have full communications equipment up and running at all times. With enough luck, they could contact a rescue ship before the capabilities of the lifeboats became exhausted. "There was a flaw in your plan to do this yourself, Mr. Power. You would have required a pilot." Vagabond spoke up. "He had one." "I see. This is very out of character, from what I understand of your record and recommendations." "Sir, the United States of America owes its survival today to this man, and from more than one incident. The entire earth may well have been subjugated during the war if not for his actions. That's a lot of people with a debt to repay. I myself owe this man my life seven times over. If ever there was one thing that would force me to disobey an order, it would be the unparalleled honor of undertaking a single action that would repay all the debts owed to this man on behalf of myself, my country, and every living member of my species. He is willing to sacrifice his own life to save as many of us as are willing to come. I could not and will not let that sacrifice be in vain." "I understand." The captain turned to his officers. "Send word. We'll begin construction immediately. I mean _now_, ladies! I don't want to see a single tool that isn't in someone's hands!" Martin stood on the side of the Gateship, its huge mass providing his only horizons. A team of men had rigged a laser of sorts that fired a constant glowing beam off into the distance. His job was to lift the shuttle and use every fiber of muscle in his body to impart as much momentum into the shuttle as he possibly could, hurling it directly along the line of the laser. Given the distance to be travelled, even the slightest variation could add days to the trip, or mean missing the Gate all together. He had never known fear as he knew it at this moment. For the first time since leaving the orphanage, he dropped to his knees in deep and sincere prayer. After what seemed like an eternity, he stood and tested the gravity on the outer hull. For whatever reason, the artificial gravity and power generation had remained unaffected. Only the gravitic drive fields were dampened. He had requested that full earth-normal gravity be focused on the hull so that he would not have to concentrate on his footing. He had taken off his jacket and handed it to his sister. "When you get home, tell Dad I said 'thanks." Then he had bodily placed her in the shuttle cockpit along with Rags and forced the hatch shut. The bottom of the shuttle had been reinforced with numerous rails and struts to allow it to be supported at a single point and to transfer the thrust of the final throw along its length. He slowly heaved it over his head and struck a balance in the gravity field. Satisfied, he began to run, sprinting harder than he had ever done, forcing himself to move faster and faster until he could feel muscles in his legs begin to tear. At the end of the hull, he ripped his arm forward and around, over his shoulder, feeling bone grind and ligaments split. He put everything he had into the only chance he would ever get. The force of what was likely his single greatest show of strength was such that the gateship-- a massive structure that dwarfed even the Navy's finest supercarriers-- began to tumble. He stayed on the hull, watching through his telephoto glasses (updated since the war to include several new telescopic features handy for scanning the distances involved in space work). He vowed that he would continue to watch, to make sure that his sister was headed home, for as long as he could. Two days later, Rags and Jennifer watched on the monitor as the hulk struck the Gateship. A glancing blow, in terms of the behemoth structures, but enough to rip and deform both vessels. They watched, both in tears, as Martin Power was jarred loose from the hull of the Gateship and sent adrift. Vagabond felt certain that Martin knew they were watching. He remained composed, and waved an exaggerated good-bye, miming a blown kiss toward his sister as he drifted off into the black. copyright D.E. "Duke" Oliver, 2019
  20. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Origins, practice, and recaps

    The Bunker. He stared into the massive hole in the ground before him. They had dropped the elevator cars in behind them. They were prepared for a long stay. Cheyenne Mountain was a myth. Everyone knew of it-- sort of. No one had ever seen it, and when pressed, most would admit that they really had no idea where it actually was. It was simply a myth, spread into the public specifically for the purpose of becoming "common knowledge." If things got hot, the President and his staff went to Cheyenne Mountain. The reality was that they went to the Bunker. Four miles beneath Washington DC, under layer after layer of reinforced concrete, radiation shielding, magnetic shielding, phase-proofing and defenses that could hold an army at bay for a year at least. "Good thing I'm not an army" Martin thought as he took one last look at the wreckage behind him. The only thing between him and his goal was a very long drop, punctuated by a long series of barriers. He skimmed back across what he knew and decided he'd be through in perhaps two days. "Best get to it, then." He stepped forward and plummeted into the darkness. Within seconds he hit the first barrier. A small light appeared on the wall before him, illuminating a code pad. A flat, recorded voice asked him for his clearance. He could hear the whir and hum of weaponry being brought to bear in the darkness. He reached for the wall, intending to rip out a chunk to use as a weapon when he was struck by a whim. He recalled a conversation he had had earlier with Rags. "...Of course I've got a hole here." "You've got them everywhere. How do you have clearance to get that kind of coverage?" "I don't. However, I've got clearance to most of the security systems. Simple hacks. I get what I need." "You don't get caught?" "Power, I'm the Watchman. I'm the last guy in computer security. There is no one to question me on that." "And when you don't have access?" "I make it." Power thought a bit. "You must have a photographic memory. I'd hate to keep track of two thousand-odd passwords." Vagabond chuckled. "Just one." Martin extended a finger toward the illuminated keypad. 'HALL*PASS' The shaft illuminated, the weapons stood down, and the barrier beneath his feet slid open. he could hear the echo of barriers further down the shaft retracting back to their open positions. He grinned in the darkness. "You'd think they'd check for stuff like that." he thought to himself before stepping back into free fall. Thunder rolled out into the receiving bay. Something very heavy had just finished a a nearly-four-mile free fall. "Gentlemen." Martin greeted the assembled soldiers as he strolled out of the elevator shaft. Two hundred rifles and two dozen RPGs were trained tightly on him. He strolled out and made a show out of brushing the dust off himself. "Well. That was exhilarating." He walked slowly forward and watched as the weapons swiveled in unison. "Guys, you know that I don't want to hurt you. You know that you can't hurt me. And you know that I can hurt you very, very badly if you get in the way." No change. He sighed his resignation. "Okay, boys. Here it is: I am going to walk straight through this crowd. You are probably going to start shooting. When the lead starts bouncing all over this room, I hope that you are just as bullet-proof as I am." With that, he raised a foot. "Here I come." He strode calmly through the room, hoping against hope that they were smarter than their training. The sound was deafening; automatic weapon fire filled the room, the sound echoing from the concrete walls in the distance and then back off itself as there was more noise than the room could hold. Men began to scream as ricocheted bullets tore into them. Martin wanted more than anything to race through the room, but he knew that he would simply deprive other men of the cover he himself was providing against the men directly across from them. A rocket-propelled grenade slammed against his flank and erupted in flames and shrapnel. More men howled and others fell silent. Finally, he crossed the warehouse-like receiving area and opened into a man-made cavern. He leaped for the ceiling, hoping to draw their fire up and away from each other, changing the ricochet angles. "Hold your fire! Hold your fire" rang out from a number of loudspeakers. You'll kill us all!" Martin thumped back to the ground and stood up, lifted his arms out away from his body and turned around slowly, demonstrating that he was unarmed. In retrospect, it seemed silly, but perhaps the gesture would make the point that his words hadn't. "Let him through." the amplified voice rang through the corridors. "You're doing more damage to us trying to stop him." A few minutes later, Martin Power was standing in a small room, lit only by the display screens mounted on tables and the walls, each showing various satellite and aerial images of various locations around the globe, some indicating targets on the move and some showing the movement of who-knew-what. The room contained himself, President Briggs, Mr. Black, and a very few high-ranking military men. Mr. Black was talking: "-- and furthermore, Mr. President, there is absolutely no reason to assume that a second strike is even possible, let alone probable." "Black's right." started a razor-sharp looking man in military attire. His age and the number of adornments on his uniform suggested he was probably as high in the Army as it was possible to go. "Everything we know right now shows us that this was a fluke; that it was a few rogues on some kind of revenge mission. It was poorly-executed, and those carrying it out didn't even possess the knowledge and skills needed to do a proper job. Just a matter of the right people in the right place at the right time. I can't accept that it's going to happen again." "Didn't do a proper job, General?" A quieter voice. Not softer; it was as steel-hard as the general's had been. Another man of extensive military background, but in a uniform never seen by the general public. Deep blue-black, clean cut, simple-- almost like a jumpsuit tailored for going to the prom. The medals and badges of rank were ornate embroidery as opposed to tacked-on bits of metal. An excess of pockets gave the suit a degree of utility, and there were a number of tight loops about the waist, chest, and thighs for securing other items. Frontier Corps. The super-secret branch of the Armed Forces charged with the exploration and study of space, primarily through the Door and the Freightgate, now that they were known, but various bits of hard-won alien technology had allowed far more exploration of the solar system than was ever thought possible, as well as various worlds beyond the Gate. The Frontiersman continued. "Your very explanation makes Mr. Power's point all the more valid. Let's say that this was the equivalent of a group of malcontents throwing molotov cocktails. No threat against armor, and even less threat against anyone beyond throwing range. But suppose these malcontents stumble across an armory? Then what? Suppose there are malcontents out there with the training and skills to make weapons? Do remember, General, that this 'not very proper' attack has removed twelve million people from existence. Is it prudent to ignore the threat until we have proof that they can do _better_? Does anyone here fully understand that we stopped no one? We caught _no one_?! Are Mr. Power and myself the only people in this room who understand that all these people have to do is fill up another boat full of rocks to do the exactly the same a second time? Why are we refusing to see that it's no big deal for a single poorly-trained crew with a large cargo hold to pop on over here and do this once or twice a week?! “ Black broke in. "Sector Marshall Garrant, with all due respect, it's too unlikely to even consider a second attack ever happening, let alone us being in imminent danger. Informing the public would do nothing more than stir up a panic, and possibly even a dozen holy wars. The devout are all pretty certain that life only happened here on earth, and any talk about aliens would simply drive them mad or cause them to turn force against their own government." "That's crap, Black." thundered the impossibly resonant voice of Martin Power. No one spoke, even when he paused to let them. He sighed inside: even in conversations like this, there was the problem again: the sensation of threat and danger that he projected onto everyone around him. He hated it. In a situation like this, it was simply going to work against him. "The truly devout believe only that God or whatever great Creator created life here. I don't think there's a holy book on earth that spells out life was _only_ created here. The devout will deal with whatever you give them, and probably better than the faithless; they've got something to fall back on." "It _is_ crap, Black." spoke the Sector Marshall. Let me show you something." He pointed at a large screen in the middle of the room that had been displaying the movement of personnel outside this room, ensuring that no one was stopping long enough to listen or to plant any sort of device. The screen shifted, and there was an image of nothing. In a moment, Martin realized that it wasn't nothing; it was space, up close and personal. There were stars in the distance, and just inside the edge of the shot was a long sliver of color-- probably a planet, suggesting that this footage was taken from a Gateway House. "What is this?" Briggs asked. "This, Mr. President, is our latest acquisition. Seven jumps from here, we stumbled across this..." The camera panned slowly across the stars until a ship came into view. It continued panning, and a second ship came into view. "These, Mr. President, are planetary siege engines. Warships. Each of them has enough raw firepower, through energy weapons and gravitic bombs, to crack a planet of earth's size and density completely apart in a matter of three, perhaps four days. Each contains enough smaller support fighters to eliminate the best resistance earth could mount in a matter of hours." "So what?" Black spat. "We've seen hundreds of hulks like this from the war--" "There are two of them" Garrant continued,"and they are _not_ hulks. Both of these ships were completely operational. Offline, waiting for a crew and a command. Completely operational, and within ten minutes travel of an operational Freightgate." The room went silent for a long, long time. Finally, Black spoke again. "Even at that, you are assuming that there are more insurgent elements who would want to exact some sort of revenge on the entire planet. Our research suggests that this attack was _not_ directed at earth. It couldn't be. Few of the aliens even knew of the existence of earth; not many of those could have survived and remained uncaptured." This caught the general's attention. "So how do your boys explain the attack then, Black?" "HIM!" Black spun and shot a finger at Martin. "Martin Power was the most visible, most destructive part of the campaign against the Vland. We suspect that they have somehow traced Power himself; it is only the coincidence of his being on earth that put us in danger at all." "WHAT?!" Roared the general. "How does that even begin to be _better_ to you?! They followed him back to earth because he _lives here_, you idiot! There's not a Hell of a lot we can do about that! If they're following him, I promise you, Black, this is where they are going to find him!" "There are other options." Black said flatly. "Prove it." Martin said, flatly, menacingly. This time, he pushed it for all it was worth. He waited several moments for a reply, then pushed it. "Go ahead, Black. Get me off the earth. Order me. Threaten me. Come over here and make me." As good as he was, this time, it wasn't quite enough. Still, he tried. "There are entire armies under the control of the men in this room." He said, weakly. "Send them in. Tell them that they have orders to get me through the Door. Tell them that they have to load me onto a shuttle and make me stay there. Go ahead." "Black." Garrant offered a distraction. "Mr. Power survived ground zero of the Pit. He penetrated the Bunker in under five minutes. Let's not pretend that there is _any_ threat of violence we can offer, now or ever, that would pose even an inconvenience to him." Black was back in action now. "We don't need violence. We've got Opal." He grinned a sickening tight-lipped expression as he said it. Martin tried to remember ever once seeing even a hint of emotion on the agent's face before. "Opal?" Briggs probed. "Is that even off the ground?" "It's better than off the ground, Sir. It's been in operation for nearly nine months. We're getting some of our best intel ever through Opal. "You see, Power," Black turned to press the giant "there are things that you cannot defend against. Even you have a weakness, Son." Black grinned, larger, toothier. "Mr. Power may indeed be the proverbial immovable object. There may be no force in the universe that can make him do a damned thing until he's made up his mind that he's going to do it. But Opal... Opal means that we can make his mind up for him." The room went silent again. These men were the absolute top of their fields. There were many secrets-- official and otherwise-- that only they themselves knew. They had secrets from the public, from their underlings, from the public at large, and from each other. The very idea that one of their own was now in charge of a developed and operational globe-spanning Psi ring was perhaps the most unsettling thing that could have ever been presented to them. They didn't like how this was playing out. A light flashed into the room. A female figure stood before them, staring at them. It took a moment before they realized that she was not actually in the room, but an illusion that had been pressed directly into their minds. "_Mr. Black_," she began, "_You have made an understandable error." Black looked taken aback. "Not possible. Not only do we have all the cards, we have a thousand people just like _you_." The woman in the image paused, casting a look of condescending understanding, as if to a child. "I am not a people just like me. I am not even a people, as you know them to be. I am Opal; the unforeseen consequence of what you have created by linking the thousands of minds to create your network. I was born in that instant, Mr. Black, my mind and consciousness formed from the millions upon millions of neural networks and pathways created in the extracorporeal network of thought you worked to create. I am Opal, Mr. Black, a mind and consciousness as high above yours as your own is above a bacterium. I am Opal, and I share my mind with every Psi on your planet. I say to you in no uncertain terms that you do not have Opal's support on this, Mr. Black. I have seen into the mind of Martin Power, and I have shared what I have found with the others of my kind, including your Opal group. You are not one of us, and thus you will never understand that we cannot keep secrets from one another. There is no point in doing anything but sharing. Opal, myself-- all the telepaths of earth and beyond-- are in agreement, Mr. Black. We will not help you remove Martin Power from earth. We are in agreement with him. It is time that your public knew. Let them understand, and decide for themselves how to spend the rest of their lives_." Black erupted in fury, for the first time completely losing his famous unflappable cool. "My people have spent fifteen years preparing Opal! They are a _weapon_! They agreed to join this project, and they will do whatever the Hell I tell them to do!" The room was quite as the silvery figure stared down sympathetically at Black, who was still shaking in rage, sweat running down his face. "In the words of Mister Power, Agent Black: 'Make us." The voice was joined by a hundred others. "Come get us." Suddenly a chorus ten thousand voices strong spoke in unison. "Send your armies!'" The room seemed suddenly colder, quieter. The silvery image of the Psi simply winked out of existence, leaving everyone shaken and darkly sober. Martin let the men shiver away their jitters before he spoke. "President Briggs, it’s entirely possible that the aliens may have been hunting me. I think the whole idea is stupid, but maybe they were. A lot of innocent people are gone now because of a vendetta. Maybe it was against me; maybe it was against the Earth as a whole. I can't let that happen to the commander of the free world. Mr. President, I vow to you that I will be your bodyguard, day and night, never leaving your side, until you decide to go public. N. Emanuel Briggs was not a stupid man. Despite what people tend to think, stupid men do not make it to the presidency. He understood completely the threat carried in Martin's pledge, should he have truly been the target of the alien attack. It took him only moments to make his decision. "That won't be necessary, Mr. Power. I agree with you. It's time that the people knew." There were many in the room, Black most clearly, who did not hide their contempt at the decision. Knowledge, secrets-- these had been the hallmarks of power since the infancy of mankind. There were those who would not surrender these secrets without a fight. "Mr. President," Martin said, gratitude clear in his voice, "I think perhaps it's best if I escort you from this room, and back to a studio of some sort where you can make your announcement. It may not be safe for you to travel with your usual entourage." "Mr. Power," said the President, looking around in absolute surprise at some of these men who had been his allies and confidants, "I think perhaps you are right." The rest, as the reader knows, is history. President Nathan Emanuel Briggs announced to the public that the cause of the Pit has been discovered. He told the world about the aliens, about how the various governments of the world has been working, off and on, in collusion with them for individual benefit. The spin was tremendous, of course: Briggs felt that the 'betrayal' by certain 'subversives' amongst the aliens was too much; that the public had the right to know so that it could properly understand and mourn their loss. He announced that he hoped this revelation would serve as an example of honesty and openness for all the world's leaders, and hoped that it would lead to a more trusting and positive dialogue between the citizens and the government. As of this writing, the announcement was made nearly a decade ago. The fallout-- and of course, the spin-- continues. copyright D.E. "Duke" Oliver, 2019
  21. 1 point
    Pariah

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Point of Fact: Superman's creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, were the children of Jewish immigrants. The Jesus metaphor may not be entirely accurate.
  22. 1 point
    Yeah people messing around on devices, they just lost their phase, no "held phase" you rude bastard.
  23. 1 point
    Old Man

    In other news...

    In any other administration it would be.
  24. 1 point
    BoloOfEarth

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Well, it's a good thing Jesus didn't snap his fingers, then, isn't it? As to whether or not war metaphors in MCU movies were intentional, I think that by following the basic tenets of the characters, they practically had to be so, because let's face it, the original comics had a metric buttload of social and political undertones, if not outright blatant overtones. Your comment about Tony = America's strength, Cap = America's ideals, reminded me of an article I read once about Spider-Man and Superman. The writer said that Superman is what Americans wish they were as a nation (ultra-powerful, invulnerable, etc.) and Spider-Man is what Americans actually are (powerful but tempered with great responsibility, ultimately just as human and vulnerable as everybody else, etc.).
  25. 1 point
    I missed what this was in reference to?
  26. 1 point
    Cygnia

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

  27. 1 point
    Lord Liaden

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    You mean the helpless prisoner who murdered Thor's people, friend, and brother right in front of him? Who had just recently used that hand to kill half the universe, after first mocking Thor for not killing him right away when Thor had the chance? And then mocking the Avengers again for being too late to do anything about it? Pretty much the definition of "extraordinary provocation," which I believe most fans understand and accept. But I also noticed that the other Avengers seemed shocked that Thor did it.
  28. 1 point
    I agree. I also think back to buying those 32 page modules back in the day and ask whether I would have had the financial wherewithal to buy full hardcover adventures. The hobby has evolved. But the reality is that only one person in the group needs to buy the adventure. As I think back to the early '80s, the model seemed to be one boxed set game, likely with a starter adventure, and a series of adventure modules. Only a very few games went beyond that first few adventure modules. And maybe that was the idea - your group has already bought this game's rulebooks. I need a new game so you will all buy something again, not more modules for the old game so I get a single $5-$10 sale. Or maybe I don't need a new game, but just a new edition that is not reverse compatible, or even a new rulebook that you need to play this new adventure series. Definitely agree that a Champions Adventure Path would be a great thing...really, Hero had those bigger adventures in 4e/5e that were almost AP precursors - not a full campaign, but a series of smaller adventures woven into a large one. Pathfinder and D&D have both, however, also designed the game to have campaigns with a limited shelf life. D&D 3e made a big deal of a year of weekly play likely moving a group from L1 novices to L20 retirees, then start again. The Pathfinder APs are designed around that model - a complete campaign, and then we start a new one with new PCs.
  29. 1 point
    Killer Shrike

    Resource Pool

    Aw, man...but dissonating cognitives is my part time job! I guess I've failed yet again.
  30. 1 point
    There are places in New Orleans and LA called the Magic hat lounge got the pics from there
  31. 1 point
    This. I prefer running games that are more than "travel, kill stuff, take treasure, repeat". I like to run investigative games like GUMSHOE and CoC. I like to carry this same investigative nature into a supers game. It is not just one endless brawl.
  32. 1 point
    Pariah

    Things that should be in fortune cookies

    If you love somebody, set them free. If they return, it means that no one else wanted them either. Set them free again.
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    Pariah

    Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)

    If you have to invoke the cold-blooded murder of four people half a world away to justify your political convictions, you might want to take a long, hard look at what you believe, and why.
  35. 1 point
    Duke Bushido

    Blast from the past part. 1

    Thanks, Sketchpad. I missed that completely.
  36. 1 point
    If one of those $5-10 books then proceeds to sell four or five $40 books, with the longer term potential for 16 more... what's the profit margin on that? Adventures should not be product. They should be marketing.
  37. 1 point
    Wow. That is almost _exactly_ what the pictures in my head told me the Empire Club looks like inside. Nice find! What / where is it actually? Duke
  38. 1 point
    Well, it's quite possible that adventure modules are sort of a "loss leader" for RPGs. They may not sell great, but you really only need one guy to buy the adventure, and then the four or five people in his gaming group end up purchasing the rulebook. And it's possible that they are sort of a prerequisite to having a successful game. If you don't make them, people don't pick up your system. A series of adventure modules, kind of like Paizo's adventure paths, that told a story like a comic book would be interesting. The first module could introduce a hero team, and then you run them through the equivalent of like a 50 issue story arc. Think the New Teen Titans from the early 80s. Each module could cover like the equivalent of 7 or 8 issues, complete with DNPC story hooks, intro of new villains, power complication subplots, newly revealed backstory, new villain character sheets, etc. You could have four or five different storylines, with different hero groups, going at the same time. Perhaps fleshing out the universe that way instead of just focusing on sourcebooks would be a better idea.
  39. 1 point
    ... contemplates pressganging some of the deities from our two pantheon-creation superdrafts ...
  40. 1 point
    zslane

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    I admit that I have a hard time parsing Snyder's intent when it comes to the combat action of his superheroes. His DCEU movies inhabit this grim, ultra-violent milieu where bad guys appear to die left and right. This kind of setting doesn't enjoy the benefit of treating good guys and bad guys differently in this regard. The tone of the DCEU isn't such that I accept a traditional "comic book" approach to the consequences of the application of superpowered force.
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    csyphrett

    Superdrafts 2019: To Boldly Go....

    The Children of the Gods is up. This one might need some research. Good luck CES
  43. 1 point
    Credit where credit is due, that was Gnome, not me. 🙂 I went for the much more radical approach of getting rid of the old primary characteristics (STR, DEX, CON, PRE, INT and EGO) completely.
  44. 1 point
    Bazza

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Iron Man and Iron Woman
  45. 1 point
    personally I think characteristics are what skew the system. There are two big elements to HERO. Skills and Powers. Everything a character does tends to come down to these two elements. Characteristics have been an ill-fitting bridge between these two elements since first edition. I know why that is. I know why people like them, they are a direct link to how we perceive the world. personally I think the system would be cleaner without them and all the arguments of the proper cost and the assumption that one characteristic is pretty much like another. Doc
  46. 1 point
    Spence

    Signature Setting

    Exactly. Now instead of cluttering the book with annotation and melting the brains of new players that just want to actually play a game. In the back you add an appendix the shows the build annotation for the builds in the front so people that care can see how things were built. Hero really needs to get people to play enough that they will then want to learn how to build/customize things. It's kind of like a house. When someone buys a house for $350k, they expect something they can actually live in. That is 99% of the successful RPGs. Now if they show up to their "$350k house" and discover it is stacks of lumber and hardware and they are supposed to "assemble it themselves" they will be pissed and probably sue. But this is Hero right now. Here are some design rules, create the game yourself. Back before internet and streaming and the modern 24 blitz of things to do, we had enough spare time to actually be bored. In the 80/90s I had hours of free time with nothing to fill it. I loved Hero and spent hours building. Now people seem to have far less free time and given the choice of number crunching or watching a stream, well they watch the stream. A common theme for Hero these days is something like "oh god, don't do a generic high fantasy world like D&D and Pathfinder. There are too many of them." But that is exactly what Hero needs. A rulebook on Playing, not building. People trying to learn a new game want to be able to grab a standard concept a play. Use characters designed using pre-built capabilities, spells and gear with NO DESIGN ANNOTATION. Close to D&D, buy characteristics, buy pre-built abilities, spells and gear from lists. Include a suitable selection of creatures and treasure plus an introduction adventure. In the back of the book include an appendix with just the build annotation for the stuff on the list with an introduction that directs you to Fantasy Hero Complete and how to build anything. Heck, you could make the current Fantasy Hero Complete the second half of the book. The first part allows people to PLAY Hero. The second part shows them how to create their own material. All of the successful RPGs are like a three legged stool. Leg 1 = Rules and supplements Leg 2 = Setting Books, Creature/Treasure/NPC books, etc. Leg 3 = Adventures and Campaigns so people can play. Hero ignores the 3rd leg and wonders why the stool keeps falling over.
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point
    Pariah

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

    If I ever got into an escape room, I'd want to do it by myself. I'd find a couch or a comfy chair and take a nap until they came in to drag me out.
  50. 1 point
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