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  1. 15 points
    Scott Ruggels

    Blast from the past part. 1

    So I have recently completed a move, to a place largr enough to not need storage. So I have bern unpacking many boxes of books. Along with finding all of my old gaming books, I found my character binder. Inside was the original Hero flyer announcing Champions, and also the character handed to me by either Bruce or Ray, for a game GMed by Steve Peterson an that convention back in 1981. I present it to you in the interests of the historical record.
  2. 9 points
    Robert Muller, as transcribed by NPR. Emphasis by myself:
  3. 8 points
  4. 7 points
    Well, I can see why many people are finding the sentiments this Batwoman expresses in that trailer to be irritating. On one level they sound quite hypocritical. This woman proclaims she doesn't want to be defined by the man she's succeeding as Gotham's protector; she wants to establish her own identity and be given credit for her own accomplishments (and she expresses those sentiments within an explicit man-to-woman dynamic). Yet in order to do that she unilaterally appropriates for herself everything that man had built -- the headquarters, equipment, methodology, even part of his name and image.
  5. 7 points
    Starlord

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Let's be fair here, Man of Steel has a heart-warming scene where Supes saves millions of acres of cornfields and dirt by deliberately dragging the battle into the center of Smallville.
  6. 7 points
    Not wrong But I personally don't think 6th took it as far as it can go. I believe it was a step too far. An RPG has two parts. 1) The rules and their internal balance. 2) Intuitive fun factor. #1 is self explanatory, while #2 is not something that can be objectively defined, but truly exists. In the obsessive quest for some kind of mathematical purity, they literally dumped the "feel" and "fun" that made Champions, Espionage, Justice Inc. and the other games so great for so many years. For me 1st through 4th was a roller coaster of fun packed fun. 5th was where Hero began to get that antiseptic feel. But it also had some of the best books they ever put out, just no actual playable adventures. It was like they were trying to bleach the game out, but the game was resisting the attempts to kill it. 6th completely changed the "feel" of the game. Even on these boards, threads like this one endlessly argue about opinions of the purity of the math and completely ignore the primary attribute of a game. Fun. Instead of the endless point cost discussions or whether Comeliness is a stat, maybe a discussion of why the greater gaming world doesn't even realize Hero exists anymore. While I know that my points will be labeled "straw men" or whatever other terms currently use for burying unpopular opinions. But there are three very real things being done by literally all of the current successful games. 1) Playable settings. 2) actual adventures and campaigns that only require the GM to read them to run. In other words playable "out of the box". One or two 6-10 episode campaigns a year are more than enough, especially when you have #3. 3) Some form of open license that allows people to create adventures without needing a specific license. That allows anywhere from dozens to hundreds, depending on the game, of low cost or free adventures to be available for people who do not have time to spend building games but want to play. They may not be top shelf master works, but they are more than sufficient to play. I normally don't really post much anymore, especially in threads like this. But sometimes I just can't help myself. It's like seeing a house on fire and the firemen are arguing over the color of its paint while it burns. It is just frustrating as well as disappointing.
  7. 7 points
    They could get Bill Shatner to play it. He has experience.
  8. 7 points
    Bazza

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

  9. 7 points
    Spence

    Signature Setting

    Exactly. Now instead of cluttering the book with annotation and melting the brains of new players that just want to actually play a game. In the back you add an appendix the shows the build annotation for the builds in the front so people that care can see how things were built. Hero really needs to get people to play enough that they will then want to learn how to build/customize things. It's kind of like a house. When someone buys a house for $350k, they expect something they can actually live in. That is 99% of the successful RPGs. Now if they show up to their "$350k house" and discover it is stacks of lumber and hardware and they are supposed to "assemble it themselves" they will be pissed and probably sue. But this is Hero right now. Here are some design rules, create the game yourself. Back before internet and streaming and the modern 24 blitz of things to do, we had enough spare time to actually be bored. In the 80/90s I had hours of free time with nothing to fill it. I loved Hero and spent hours building. Now people seem to have far less free time and given the choice of number crunching or watching a stream, well they watch the stream. A common theme for Hero these days is something like "oh god, don't do a generic high fantasy world like D&D and Pathfinder. There are too many of them." But that is exactly what Hero needs. A rulebook on Playing, not building. People trying to learn a new game want to be able to grab a standard concept a play. Use characters designed using pre-built capabilities, spells and gear with NO DESIGN ANNOTATION. Close to D&D, buy characteristics, buy pre-built abilities, spells and gear from lists. Include a suitable selection of creatures and treasure plus an introduction adventure. In the back of the book include an appendix with just the build annotation for the stuff on the list with an introduction that directs you to Fantasy Hero Complete and how to build anything. Heck, you could make the current Fantasy Hero Complete the second half of the book. The first part allows people to PLAY Hero. The second part shows them how to create their own material. All of the successful RPGs are like a three legged stool. Leg 1 = Rules and supplements Leg 2 = Setting Books, Creature/Treasure/NPC books, etc. Leg 3 = Adventures and Campaigns so people can play. Hero ignores the 3rd leg and wonders why the stool keeps falling over.
  10. 7 points
    Starlord

    In other news...

    This car doesn't have seat warmers or a rear camera... ...and this car doesn't have WiFi hotspot or a water sensitive windshield... ...but this car is juuuust right.
  11. 7 points
    Scott Ruggels

    Blast from the past part. 1

    In college , I shifted from Fine Art, to Industrial Design, and loved it. I was still playing Champions with the same group, but I learned new art techniques in college, such as the then, in vogue, Syd Meade style, Marker/colored pencil/ crushed chalk concept rendering, a style made obsolete by the adoption of Photoshop, when the first color Macintosh came on the scene a few years later. The character was was kind of forgettable, a flying psychic brick, built wildly inefficiently and played maybe twice, but people would always pause and look at the art when paging through the binder.
  12. 7 points
    Certified

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Just wanted to post my reaction after finally seeing Endgame. Spoiled for language.
  13. 6 points
    Margarita Man Nibblin' on sponge cake Helping a thug make The smartest decision he's made in some time Yeah he'll get off scott free But that doesn't bug me 'Cause the three he'll turn in are the worst kinds of slime. Savin' the day again, I'm Margarita Man Scanning for some good deed I can do Some people claim the fact I'm here is a shame, But I know, that they don't have a clue. That mugger was stalking A young woman walking But now he's freaked out and his mind's come unglued She's a real beauty A Mexican cutie She's had a close call, but she hasn't a clue. Savin' the day again, I'm Margarita Man Scanning for some good deed I can do Some people claim the fact I'm here is a shame, But I know, that they don't have a clue. My fights, I must pick 'em I can't save each victim And mind reading psychopaths drives me to drink But if you ask how come Some killers get so dumb And finally get caught, well now, what do you think? Savin' the day again, I'm Margarita Man Scanning for some good deed I can do Some people claim the fact I'm here is a shame, But I know, that they don't have a clue. Lucius Alexander Some people claim that Jimmy Buffet's to blame, But I know, it's the palindromedary's fault.
  14. 6 points
    Christopher R Taylor

    Superhero Cosplayers

    Spaaaaaaace Ghosst!
  15. 6 points
    Old Man

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

  16. 6 points
    massey

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    I don't blame Superman for killing Zod. He didn't have a choice. I do blame Zack Snyder for making a Superman movie where protecting civilians is not a priority. I said earlier, Marvel's heroes all have a body count. I mean, dear God, Iron Man gave a teenage kid a suit with an "instant kill" option. He's definitely got the irresponsible uncle role down. Tony kills I don't know how many terrorists in the first movie. Now these are all bad guys who are getting killed, and the heroes all make a dedicated effort to save innocent people. And the only person who is portrayed as any sort of moral paragon is Cap. Thor is awesome, but he's not exactly a role model in our modern society. Captain America is a soldier, and we all accept that killing Nazis in WW2 is okay. Then in Winter Soldier, he's kind of a James Bond superspy, going on missions for what he thinks is a good cause serving his country. But Cap goes out of his way in Civil War to avoid killing any of the cops who are going after Bucky. Superman is a different character altogether. As far as moral symbols, he and Cap are similar. But Cap has always been willing to kill, if he had to. His powers are more limited, and often he doesn't have the choice. Superman's powers mean that he almost always has the option to not kill. If he had spent the entire movie saving civilians, and then he had to snap Zod's neck at the end, we'd have more sympathy. As it was, he had just had a brawl where tens of thousands (maybe hundreds of thousands) of people would have died, and then he's sad because he had to kill the villain? It didn't feel right.
  17. 6 points
    Lord Liaden

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    A large part of that was my fault, for which I apologize. So let me see if I can get it back on track, with an observation raised by massey: That could be. It's certainly what was on my mind when I saw that now-infamous scene. But it might also have to do with the way most people have come to learn about these characters. Superman and Batman in particular have had the highest profile among non-comics readers due to previous movies; and their principles against killing are probably well established in the cultural zeitgeist. OTOH the majority of people were introduced to Marvel's heroes as presented in the MCU. Tony Stark was an arms manufacturer, and was shown killing recognizably bad people in his first movie. Steve Rogers was a soldier during war time. Thor was a warrior from a warrior culture. Hulk was a raging but innocent monster. Black Widow and Hawkeye were literal professional assassins. The standards established for them in those appearances didn't include unwillingness to kill. OTOH the MCU heroes have repeatedly been depicted going out of their way to protect innocent civilians, something the DCEU heroes had generally neglected, at least in their first few movies. That has reinforced the impression that the Marvel crew don't treat life lightly.
  18. 6 points
    You didn't miss anything, no worries. I've just been slow to get back in the swing of things lately. Here are the results of this one: Congratulations to Bazza for winning the Best New Team-Up Book Tournament! Miles Morales (Bazza) – 35 points Ms. Marvel (Khan) (Bazza) – 31 points Foxbat (Pariah) – 27 points Squirrel Girl (Pariah) – 22 points Scott Free (Pattern Ghost) – 20 points I'm going to take a little break from these for a while, till I get my head together a bit more. Thanks for playing along everyone!
  19. 6 points
    Confounding variables are the bane of social arguments based on statistical analysis. Do single-parent households cause poverty, incarceration, sexual abuse, etc? Or does poverty cause higher incarceration rates and incidentally make it harder for families to stay together? Or are these all epiphenomena of something else? The correlations do not necessarily show that you can solve these other problems by pressuring parents to stay together. Liberalism is a package deal. Poverty is declining worldwide along with homophobia, institutionalized misogyny, racism, and many other social evils. The connection between free markets and, say, religious tolerance is that it all begins with the liberal assumption that individuals matter more than traditional elites, taboos and social structures. Once you apply this idea in one part of society, it spreads. For instance, women freed from chattel status start their own businesses, increasing the society's net capacity to generate wealth. I will grant you, many contemporary American progressives seem to have forgotten that free markets are a liberal idea -- free people to seek their own benefit instead of locking them into traditional caste occupations, and give them access to property instead of elites locking up all the wealth -- but economic, political and social liberalism do go together and reinforce each other. On this I'll also recommend Acemoglu and Robinson's Why Nations Fail, which discusses this in detail. One of their major arguments is that attempts to combine free markets with social and political restrictions are doomed to fail: Either the authoritarian political system chokes the economy into eventual stagnation and decline, or the wealthier population demands social and political liberalization. The upshot is that when anyone seems to be defending Traditional Order, of any sort, I have my doubts. I think the evidence is pretty strong that breaking Traditional Orders usually produces more good than harm. Dean Shomshak
  20. 6 points
    dsatow

    Superhero Cosplayers

    Just thought I'd upload this pic from the recent Fanime convention. i was planning to take a lot more, but this years video rooms had a lot of good stuff. Anyways, I thought she did a great job on the outfit so enjoy.
  21. 6 points
    From yesterday's youth group game: First off, everyone was up for Bowl to Hit, but it was just too stinkin' hot. Red Cloak, for reasons no one can understand, gets swept up in the moment and attempts to do something truly ridiculous: the character is not remotely acrobatic and, it should be noted, wears a large, heavy cloak. He attempts-- from 4" away (2e rules: 8 meters) to leap over a railing, grab a chandelier, swing across the convention center, and leap to the deck on the other side. In spite of the penalties against him, using just his natural DEX he is able to make the initial leap, impart momentum to the chandelier, then he fumbles the next roll. He gets a six on his Luck roll, so I rule that his cloak has become entangled in the chandelier and he is now suspended thirty feet from the floor below. (This handily explains how he failed the roll, and saves him from a nasty fall to the floor below). His player (the oldest player, at 14) is chagrinned, but wants to champion the idea of what he tried. Firefly's player, out of character: "Dude, I'm twelve and _I_ knew that was stupid."
  22. 6 points
    Cygnia

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

  23. 6 points
    Cancer

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

    I feel obliged to point out that he is making an unwarranted assumption as to the content of the prayers.
  24. 6 points
    Bazza

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

    About 1 Bowie (new unit of measurement)
  25. 6 points
    Armory

    Blast from the past part. 1

    I dug out my very first character sheet, from 1982. My forum avatar is a City of Heroes version of this character.
  26. 6 points
    Lord Liaden

    The Case for Comeliness

    No one needs to apologize for liking something, or not liking something, or preferring one thing to another. That's normal human nature. Where we raise controversy is in taking the position that the reason we prefer something makes it objectively, qualitatively "better." If we can't quantify the difference in a way that makes direct comparisons meaningful, there's no way to win that argument.
  27. 6 points
    Not exactly a quote, but an interesting event overall, and I can't really think of a more relevant place to put it. My youth group game is the only "weekly" game I have, after all, the other two being a bi-weekly game and an "at least every four weeks; more if possible" game. I picked up a set of these: https://www.amazon.com/Oojami-Giant-Wooden-Carrying-Canvas/dp/B072KGYFLF/ref=sr_1_8?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxYnMwq2o4gIVksDICh01aw9UEAAYASAAEgK7a_D_BwE&hvadid=328191546198&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9011003&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=b&hvrand=4774527260171532108&hvtargid=kwd-314746230900&hydadcr=2335_9913328&keywords=large+dice+wooden&qid=1558295080&s=gateway&sr=8-8 Not _exactly_ those, but similar. For those not wanting to follow links posted by relative strangers on the internet, it leads to a set of wooden dice roughly 3-1/2" on a side. They are essentially waste cuts and drops from hardwood 4x4s, evened up and finished into "yard dice" or "lawn dice" or (creatively) "Yardzee" dice. Went to Statesboro yesterday (wife wanted to go to Hobby Lobby and get some new brushes) and I saw the set of five (yeah, the set I bought only had 5 pieces, but then, it rang up at ten bucks, so I'm good ) and picked it up. On the way home we stopped and she bought a car, but this isn't that story. In fact, all I will say about that story is that, after nearly two decades of road tripping in the Leviathan, she now claims she wants something that rides better. (the nerve of some people!) So, in honor of the last of the bearable summer weather (by this time next week, central GA will be Hell's own bakery), I decided to do something to get us out into the weather and enjoy the last breeze we're going to have until January. We used three of the dice as "Skill check" dice-- forgive the non-HERO-ness of the term, but over the years, I have found people pick up on the roll for Skills and Roll to Hit if they learn them to be "Skill Checks." Don't know why, unless it just helps them group the mechanics in their head. Now make no mistake, rolling three of those dice isn't possible. You end up sort of backsnap-tossing it into the air to give it random spins, etc, and wait for it to land. (I know: I played around with the viability of this idea last night when we got home and the wife was tired of driving her new car.) I don't know why-- probably for _me_, as things conspire to keep me out of pretty weather but locked outside in rain, blast-ovens, of near-freezing temperatures with shocking regularity-- but I really wanted this to be a fun thing to do. So I grabbed a few paint paddles-- the little balsa or white-wood slats they give you when you buy a can of paint-- and selected tomorrow's (today's) bad guys and a few random NPC-types, ad of course, the Heroes themselves, then printed the character portraits (remember I still use 2e, and our character sheets are _way_ more fun than anything that's come after 4e) and glued them the paint paddles. Today's game featured the all-new fair-weather attack technique of "Bowl to Hit." When a character wished to make an attack, his target's wood-and-paper effigy was stuck in the dirt roughly eight feet away. The player had three shots (roll 3d6, right? ) he would fire off his three dice toward his target. If at any time he hit the target with one of the dice, bingo! Automatic hit. :D. If he did _not_ hit the target but the total of the three dice said he made it, then he hit. If he both hit the target _and_ made his roll, then a random good thing happened: extra damage, automatic Stunning, or some such thing as that. If there were _multiple_ opponents, then multiple targets were set up. You might hit an opponent totally different from the one you were aiming at! And of course, the die total might say "nope; seems you hit the _both_! And if there were innocent bystanders, well things got.... dicey..... (wow. That hurt more than I thought it would) It was really funny watching them just _sling_ the dice at the villains, but when there were civilians, they'd oh-so-carefully line up their shots, roll the die, and wince at every odd tumble..... "There." I proclaimed. "Now you have a _much_ better idea of what it's like to actually be a super-hero-- to know how much power you have, and how easily you could accidentally hurt someone. You understand the worry and fear your character's should have when fighting out in the open, and you understand why you might want to restrain the amount of power you use when something bad happens at the mall or the amusement park. " Most of them found that to be eye-opening, as most of them (the oldest is in ninth grade right now) get their ideas of superheroes from movies, which don't seem to put a lot of emphasis on internal struggle or watching out for the civilians. Yeah, this story goes nowhere, and only has a single quote, and it's by the world's worst Superhero Sensei, but still: it was a blast, and I wanted to share it. Y'all have fun. Duke
  28. 6 points
    Old Man

    More space news!

    Sunset on Mars:
  29. 5 points
  30. 5 points
  31. 5 points
    As I see it, D&D has the following advantages: Name recognition. D&D has by far the most name recognition out of any RPG and is, still, in 2019 A.D. synonymous with paper and pencil roleplaying. In the marketing progression of repetition -> association -> trust, D&D is farthest along and is therefore most likely to be tried. I doubt most normals could even name a second RPG. Production values. Even the worst D&D publications have had high quality writing and graphic design throughout. Support. There is no shortage of modules, expansions, settings, and sourcebooks available for D&D. Low barrier to entry. D&D is easy to start playing. Here is your character sheet and a d20, which goblin do you hit? Having played 5e D&D, I can say that it is not, in fact, much simpler than Hero once you get into it. Reactions, actions, saves, spell slots, specials, armor class, paths, XP, it's dizzying. And 5e is simplified! But it's easy to start in a way that Hero's highly customizable character creation process is not. (Don't even get me started on Pathfinder. That s--t is unplayable.) Player base. Related to all of the above, D&D has the critical mass of users that makes it easier to find a good group to play with. RPGs are not a solo game, after all. Hero loses on every single point. I've argued this before, but my approach to popularizing Hero would go like this. (It's going to be expensive.) License Marvel comics characters. It's mind boggling to me that there is no Marvel superhero RPG that's giving D&D a run for its money. Take a property that is enjoying unbelievable popularity right now and pair it with the one game system that can handle it. Quality. We have to invest in copywriting, art, layout, and design. Publication standards in 2019 are just way ahead of any Hero publication in the past two decades. Hide the system. Hero is an RPG system and an RPG-system-creation-system, and the latter is what scares people. List powers as "Optic Blast Level 12", not "12d6 Energy Blast No Spread 0 END Not vs. Ruby (-1/4)". 95% of the time all you need to know is you roll 12d6 for damage. Simplify. I love the SPD chart, but save it for the "Advanced" game. Likewise with the other figured stats (but keep Stunning). Ditch most Advantages and Limitations. Don't publish Entangle with half a dozen specific advantages, publish three Spider-Man web powers: Entangle, TK, and ranged Blast. Make it into a board or card game. I wasn't kidding about simplification. Distill Hero into a board game or card game that any kid can pick up. Save the full power of the Hero system for "Advanced" expansions that are advertised at the end of the rulebook ("Pick up the Advanced game and make your own superhero!!") Support. Publish some modules FFS. Codevelop an online version of the simple and advanced games to make it easier to pick up players. I can play Catan online. Hero? Nope. Anyway that's my approach. I'm aware that it would require a level of resources that the Hero System has basically never enjoyed and that it's a pipe dream for this reason. Does anyone have any embellishments?
  32. 5 points
    Doc Democracy

    Sell me on Hero System

    My big sell for HERO is internal consistency. D&D is full of black boxes and special cases. HERO is completely transparent and provides you with all the tools to tweak characters, monsters and spells. You can do it in D&D but the risk of introducing imbalances in the system are massive.
  33. 5 points
    Toxxus

    Sell me on Hero System

    If you've been playing D&D 5th Ed for several years (especially the dumbed-down Adventurer's League version) then here are some things you'll get from Fantasy HERO: 1- Hit locations - These really spice up the randomness of combat. 2- Realistic Armor Interactions - Armor makes you safer at the cost of being slower, clumsier and easier to hit. 3- Monsters and Enemies are scary - The unlimited build potential for villains means players can't rely on their innate knowledge of the Monster Manual to know what is happening. Each creature can be a terrifying and unique thing with custom powers. 4- Character Creation is INCREDIBLY open-ended. There are endless character concepts you just can't do in D&D. In HERO - You can do them. My Current saturday group: Fire sorceress (pretty straight forward), a witcher built on the Witcher 3 model, Udyr from League of Legends, an Air Bender, a dwarven explosives expert and a dragon born priest with powers based on cold 5- Combat overall feels more engaging with a larger number of moves and a limited number of hit points. Did you take an arrow - in the eye? You're down and dying. Weapons are actually scary. The only REAL drawback about HERO that my players continue to gripe about is that character creation is painfully open-ended. They know what they want, but not how to model it. My two tables alone have resulted in at least 3-4 additional sales of Hero Designer. Players love being able to make their character the way they imagine it and not being constrained by classes.
  34. 5 points
    Chris Goodwin

    Sell me on Hero System

    Let's say you've been playing D&D all these years, and want to try a different genre. Modern espionage, or supers, or post-apocalyptic. Let's say you've tried reskinning D&D for all of those and none of them were satisfactory to you for one reason or another. Further, when you tried different systems, your players balked; you couldn't get any of them to sit through more than one session because it was too different. If you're playing Hero, you don't need to learn a new system to switch genres. (edited some of the above)
  35. 5 points
    Cancer

    More space news!

    A couple of quibbles here. Most of these are in the Venus section of the above ... the quote "only three missions" to Venus omits several Soviet Venera landers in the 1960s; no one else has put a functioning probe on the surface of that planet. And it also omits what to my mind is the most plausible cause: Venus was roughly Earthlike (in terms of surface and atmosphere conditions) when formed and stayed that way until about a billion years ago. The inevitably increasing energy output of the Sun (that's a bulletproof result from stellar evolution studies; I can talk about that later if you want, but the initial results came as far back as the 1950s) pushed the surface temperature of Venus above 100 C, and that triggered the runaway greenhouse effect that caused a planet-wide volcanic outburst, destroyed all the sedimentary rocks and liberated the CO2 in those into the atmospheres, and made the situation we now observe. Supporting this idea: the mass of CO2 in Venus's atmosphere is reasonably close to the mass of CO2 locked up in carbonate sedimentary rocks on Earth, so that if you were to cook Earth's surface over 100C, the same Venus-like end state is well within the possible results. (That also would mean that it'll be impossible to tell if there was ever life on Venus: even the fossils get destroyed in that volcanic outburst, so not even putting a rock-collecting rover on the planet would be able to find anything.) The solar magnetic field thing omits a bunch of admittedly complex results. Measuring the waves that appear on the solar surface (see https://gong.nso.edu/) continuously for more than a decade gives you enough data to solve for the run of pressure, density, and something about the fluid velocities in the solar interior. We know the convective zone rotates almost as a solid, which tells you that magnetic fields are really important to the solar structure through the convective layer. But, below the convective zone, the rotation is not like a solid. The equations for the generation of a magnetic field are horrible beyond belief (magnetohydrodynamics) so a detailed solution is certainly beyond our grasp anytime soon. And while GONG and other observational projects has given us glorious data on the Sun and we have learned a lot, it is clear from historical data that the Sun has activity variations on timescales of centuries (at least), and we haven't enough of that to be able to explain it, either. The Kuiper Belt/Oort Cloud situation is ... a new-ish problem, and one attributable to the newness. Remember, while the first KB object was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, Pluto was misidentified as a planet and retained that status until the next few KBOs were found in the 1990s. Observations of things that far out are really difficult, requiring the largest telescopes to gather enough light to see really faint and distant bodies, and by an inevitable corollary of optics, really big telescopes can only see a tiny piece of sky at one time ... so survey work is very slow and very expensive in terms of big telescope time. I don't think anyone has the hubris to claim we know enough about the KB to make meaningful guesses about how many objects there are, anything like their global population statistics, or even how much mass is out there. There are some really striking things we have seen about the collection of KBOs we know about so far (there are way more binaries and satellites and rings than anyone guessed, and the population shows some weird correlations between mean distance of the object and the shape and orientation of its orbit, which has to be telling us something but we don't really know what yet), but absolutely everyone admits we have seen only a tiny fraction of what is out there. As for Uranus, that planet has been visited by spacecraft exactly once, and Voyager's fly-by back in 1986 caught the planet doing ... absolutely nothing, at about the time the planet's rotation axis was pointed as close to right at the Sun as it ever does. Some pretty severe (at the time) image analysis was needed to see the planet as anything but a pale blue cue ball. Since then Hubble Space Telescope, and some groundbased telescope/instrument combos that didn't exist until the 21st Century, have found that at other seasons, the planet isn't just a quiescent plain cue ball, which should not be a surprise in any way. But if you start the clock at the 1986 fly-by, we haven't been observing the planet for even half of its year yet ... that's 33 (Earth) years of good observations compared to an 84 Earth-year orbital period for Uranus. I think it would be fair to wait at least until we'd seen a full seasons cycle before we framed ideas about the planet's climate should be like.
  36. 5 points
    Logan.1179

    Jokes

  37. 5 points
    Its on CW so its gonna be awful, it doesn't even really matter what the content is.
  38. 5 points
    mattingly

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    If Thanos was the only good villain that Marvel had to pick from in the past 50 years, it might be worth filling his backstory more, but I'd rather see someone else take the screentime.
  39. 5 points
    Spence

    Signature Setting

    Yes, but a clarification is needed. Hero has cranked out multiple sets of rules from huge to small. There already exists a bare minimum 6th Edition rule book. The problem is Hero rulebooks are not playable as they are. Hero rulebooks are basically design documents that can be used to create a game. What is really needed is a "set" that would allow a brand new player to buy the box on Monday, read it Tuesday and run a intro session on Wednesday. Too many people don't understand that building characters, NPCs and such is not the objective and is not playing. Running a PC in an adventure is playing.
  40. 5 points
    Cancer

    On This Day in History

    In a couple of hours, it will be June 6 by Universal Time: 75th Anniversary of the Allied landings in Normandy. Fewer and fewer of the participants are still with us as time goes by, but let us never forget any of them.
  41. 5 points
    Old Man

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Exactly this. Even though the Marvel universe has always been grayer than DC, the MCU films stressed the importance of protecting innocents to the point where it was literally the central catalyst for at least two of the films (AoU and Civil War). Whereas the Snyderverse took one character who is consistently written as protecting innocents and made him seem indifferent at best to the collateral damage he caused, and took another who specifically refuses to use guns and won't even blow up ducks and turned him into a machinegun-wielding hardcore vigilante. In fact off the top of my head: Avengers I: During the Battle of New York, Cap's entire focus is protecting bystanders from collateral damage. Iron Man risks his life to save the city from a nuke fired by Hydra. Avengers AoU: Stark creates a suit whose entire purpose is to stop Hulk from rampaging in a city. Hawkeye directs the evacuation onto the helicarrier and sacrifices himself to save Sokovian citizens from machine gun fire. Stark and Thor risk their lives to blow up Sokovia preventing it from killing uncounted civilians. Avengers IW: Quill lets his own anger get in the way of saving the universe, and audiences hate him for it. Thor: Thor finally gets motivation when he sees Destroyer defeat the Warriors Three and come for the diner and its mortal occupants. Thor Ragnarok: The last half of this film is Thor & Co. saving Asgardian civilians from Hela. Captain America: Cap deliberately crashes the Hydra plane to prevent its weapons from being used against American cities. Iron Man 2: Stark refuses to sell suits to the DoD. Spider Man: Homecoming: Washington Monument, Staten Island ferry. Doctor Strange: Protecting Earth is literally his entire job. Black Panther: By the end of the film T'Challa has saved the world from the Wakandan military and has taken a more active role in protecting civilians worldwide. Tl;dr: The protection of civilians is a constant thread throughout the MCU. In the DCEU prior to WW, it's... not a priority.
  42. 5 points
    dmjalund

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

    Yes, there is a Stark Contrast between the two
  43. 5 points
    Starlord

    In other news...

    Ark Encounter sues insurers
  44. 5 points
    Doc Democracy

    Golden Age

    My son is 14 and desperate to draw for my games. This is his interpretation of the Omega Men from the prologues...
  45. 5 points
    There's debate about everything, including whether or not the Earth is flat, so I don't find the existence of debate meaningful. An individual can be subject to multiple jurisdictions. Almost all of us are. I'm subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, the state of Texas, and the city of Austin. If I were in the military I'd also be subject to that jurisdiction. If I travel to England, I'm subject to the jurisdiction of that country, but still subject to the jurisdiction of the US (unless I go through the complex process of renouncing my citizenship). The amendment does not say subject exclusively to the jurisdiction of the US. The argument that being subject to another jurisdiction somehow means they aren't subject to US jurisdiction is entirely specious. Besides which, to argue that these children are not subject to the jurisdiction of the US is to argue that their parents also are not. If they are not subject to the jurisdiction of the US, then they are not bound by its laws. If that were the case, US law enforcement would have no authority over them. Children of anyone with diplomatic immunity have always been excluded for exactly that reason. They, in fact, are not subject to the jurisdiction of the US. That's what diplomatic immunity is.
  46. 5 points
    RDU Neil

    Avengers Endgame with spoilers

  47. 5 points
    Old Man

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

  48. 5 points
    Cygnia

    Funny Pics II: The Revenge

    Good dad
  49. 5 points
    Pariah

    The Academics Thread

    Another student suggested that we stop referring to a certain group of people as "anti-vaxxers" and start calling them "plague enthusiasts".
  50. 5 points
    Doc Democracy

    Buying back OMCV

    (Damn! I said I had done my last post here) I bet you could come up with 100 different ways a character is going to notice and be disadvantaged with strength zero (or 1 if we are doing 6th RAW). What problem is Mr Zero OMCV going to have in most normal games. The GM will not have to work hard with someone selling back STR, he is entitled to say he is not interested in putting in the time or mental effort to make the OMCV sellback worth it. The rules are not just about the players...powers, complications and sellbacks need joint buy-in. Doc
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