Jump to content

DShomshak

HERO Member
  • Content Count

    1,651
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    13

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Matt the Bruins in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    I do hope a Biden Administration can find a role for Yang.  His interviews on ATC and other programs, as well as his debate appearances, impressed me with his intelligence, coherence, public spirit and originality. I mean, I don't know if Universal Basic Income is a good idea or a bad idea, but it's an attempt at a practical solution and escape from ideological/cultural trench warfare.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  2. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Hermit in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    I do hope a Biden Administration can find a role for Yang.  His interviews on ATC and other programs, as well as his debate appearances, impressed me with his intelligence, coherence, public spirit and originality. I mean, I don't know if Universal Basic Income is a good idea or a bad idea, but it's an attempt at a practical solution and escape from ideological/cultural trench warfare.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  3. Sad
    DShomshak reacted to Starlord in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    QAnon supporter Marjorie Greene wins Georgia primary
     
    So...yeah.
  4. Like
    DShomshak reacted to Cygnia in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Debunking The Lies, Smears, and Distortions about Kamala Harris
  5. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Lord Liaden in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    When Kamala Harris was running, Al Things Considered interviewed her (along with a bunch of other Dem candidates), and she advanced a rather interesting argument that used infrastructure to talk about structural racism and social justice.. To wit: If roads don't get maintained properly, they are more likely to damage vehicles. For a fairly prosperous person, this is no big deal. For a poor person, it's catastrophic. It can mean choosing between paying rent or paying for car repair, or losing a job because you can't get to it for a few days. And of course, guess which groups are disproportionately poor? So, administrations that are stingy about road repair help to entrench poverty; spending money on road repair can help, well, de-entrench poverty.
     
    It's not a heroic attitude toward social reform. "Fix the roads!" doesn't speak of villainy confronted and virtue established. But to me it suggests someone who's thinking analytically about what practical steps can be taken to relieve social ills.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  6. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Matt the Bruins in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    When Kamala Harris was running, Al Things Considered interviewed her (along with a bunch of other Dem candidates), and she advanced a rather interesting argument that used infrastructure to talk about structural racism and social justice.. To wit: If roads don't get maintained properly, they are more likely to damage vehicles. For a fairly prosperous person, this is no big deal. For a poor person, it's catastrophic. It can mean choosing between paying rent or paying for car repair, or losing a job because you can't get to it for a few days. And of course, guess which groups are disproportionately poor? So, administrations that are stingy about road repair help to entrench poverty; spending money on road repair can help, well, de-entrench poverty.
     
    It's not a heroic attitude toward social reform. "Fix the roads!" doesn't speak of villainy confronted and virtue established. But to me it suggests someone who's thinking analytically about what practical steps can be taken to relieve social ills.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  7. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from wcw43921 in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    When Kamala Harris was running, Al Things Considered interviewed her (along with a bunch of other Dem candidates), and she advanced a rather interesting argument that used infrastructure to talk about structural racism and social justice.. To wit: If roads don't get maintained properly, they are more likely to damage vehicles. For a fairly prosperous person, this is no big deal. For a poor person, it's catastrophic. It can mean choosing between paying rent or paying for car repair, or losing a job because you can't get to it for a few days. And of course, guess which groups are disproportionately poor? So, administrations that are stingy about road repair help to entrench poverty; spending money on road repair can help, well, de-entrench poverty.
     
    It's not a heroic attitude toward social reform. "Fix the roads!" doesn't speak of villainy confronted and virtue established. But to me it suggests someone who's thinking analytically about what practical steps can be taken to relieve social ills.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  8. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from pinecone in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    When Kamala Harris was running, Al Things Considered interviewed her (along with a bunch of other Dem candidates), and she advanced a rather interesting argument that used infrastructure to talk about structural racism and social justice.. To wit: If roads don't get maintained properly, they are more likely to damage vehicles. For a fairly prosperous person, this is no big deal. For a poor person, it's catastrophic. It can mean choosing between paying rent or paying for car repair, or losing a job because you can't get to it for a few days. And of course, guess which groups are disproportionately poor? So, administrations that are stingy about road repair help to entrench poverty; spending money on road repair can help, well, de-entrench poverty.
     
    It's not a heroic attitude toward social reform. "Fix the roads!" doesn't speak of villainy confronted and virtue established. But to me it suggests someone who's thinking analytically about what practical steps can be taken to relieve social ills.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  9. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Cygnia in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    When Kamala Harris was running, Al Things Considered interviewed her (along with a bunch of other Dem candidates), and she advanced a rather interesting argument that used infrastructure to talk about structural racism and social justice.. To wit: If roads don't get maintained properly, they are more likely to damage vehicles. For a fairly prosperous person, this is no big deal. For a poor person, it's catastrophic. It can mean choosing between paying rent or paying for car repair, or losing a job because you can't get to it for a few days. And of course, guess which groups are disproportionately poor? So, administrations that are stingy about road repair help to entrench poverty; spending money on road repair can help, well, de-entrench poverty.
     
    It's not a heroic attitude toward social reform. "Fix the roads!" doesn't speak of villainy confronted and virtue established. But to me it suggests someone who's thinking analytically about what practical steps can be taken to relieve social ills.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  10. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Scott Ruggels in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    As an addendum to my last post: In contrast to ROS, I am not sure I can remember 10 episodes of Next Generation I would even describe as good, let alone "10 best." To get 10 eps I remember at all, I'd have to go into the dreadful ones.
     
    One thing about TOS... The stories often leave me wanting to know more, what happened later. Did the Federation ever manage peaceful contact with the Gorns or the Tholians? Did the Horta species ever seek wider contact with other people? What happened to Vaal's people, or Landru's, with the computer overlord gone? Did Eminiar and Vendikar end their war? Did the Iotians try to get a piece of the Federation's action? And so on.
     
    I know that many, many ST spinoff novels have been written that explore such potential ramifications. Again, in contrast I can't think of many, if any, stories from TNG where I'd like to see "what happened next."
     
    Dean Shomshak
  11. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Grailknight in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    When Kamala Harris was running, Al Things Considered interviewed her (along with a bunch of other Dem candidates), and she advanced a rather interesting argument that used infrastructure to talk about structural racism and social justice.. To wit: If roads don't get maintained properly, they are more likely to damage vehicles. For a fairly prosperous person, this is no big deal. For a poor person, it's catastrophic. It can mean choosing between paying rent or paying for car repair, or losing a job because you can't get to it for a few days. And of course, guess which groups are disproportionately poor? So, administrations that are stingy about road repair help to entrench poverty; spending money on road repair can help, well, de-entrench poverty.
     
    It's not a heroic attitude toward social reform. "Fix the roads!" doesn't speak of villainy confronted and virtue established. But to me it suggests someone who's thinking analytically about what practical steps can be taken to relieve social ills.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  12. Thanks
    DShomshak got a reaction from mattingly in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    I will give you Measure of a Man. Some of the ones on your list I don't remember at all, possibly because the titles are so boring.
     
    I did like the episode with Ardra -- I think it was called Devil's Due. A romp rather than high drama, but I give it props for showing the Clarkean possibilities for Federation tech -- and that Picard isn't fooled.
     
    My nomination for an actually brilliant ep was the one where, by a series of accidents, a village of people on a primitive planet think Picard is a god. His attempts to fix this violation of the Prime Dorective are indeed high drama: "Picard must make a decision" rather than merely "Picard must solve a problem." But like I said, I can't remember the title.
     
    (And I do agree, DS9 was better than TNG in just about every way.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
  13. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Spence in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    I will give you Measure of a Man. Some of the ones on your list I don't remember at all, possibly because the titles are so boring.
     
    I did like the episode with Ardra -- I think it was called Devil's Due. A romp rather than high drama, but I give it props for showing the Clarkean possibilities for Federation tech -- and that Picard isn't fooled.
     
    My nomination for an actually brilliant ep was the one where, by a series of accidents, a village of people on a primitive planet think Picard is a god. His attempts to fix this violation of the Prime Dorective are indeed high drama: "Picard must make a decision" rather than merely "Picard must solve a problem." But like I said, I can't remember the title.
     
    (And I do agree, DS9 was better than TNG in just about every way.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
  14. Like
    DShomshak reacted to greypaladin_01 in Reboot the CU Uuniverse, WWYD?   
    At the risk of derailing things.   I think maybe part of the issue is the renaming of the city when rebuilt.   Even going Robocop and New Detroit-ing it would have not 'erased' the city.  Giving it a new name feels more like replacing something new that ignores the old.   This is all very subjective, but taking a 'real' city in game world context and then making it fictional one did always feel a little odd.    New Detroit:  The Millennium City, would have solved that maybe to a degree.
     
    For my votes on the main topic though.   I think that a few more options all over the country would be nice, even if they are not overly detailed.   If we are going to have fictionalized cities in the DC style then lets have more than just New York city five different times.
  15. Like
    DShomshak reacted to Starlord in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    Wow, have to vehemently agree to disagree there.  Overall, I think DS9 is better than TNG, but TNG easily has at least a dozen really good to great episodes IMO.
     
    Just off the top of my head -
     
    Measure of A Man
    Darmok
    Inner Light
    Sins of the Father
    Best of Both Worlds
    I, Borg
    Tapestry
    Conundrum
    Cause and Effect
     
    I can think of several more in my head, but I don't know their titles.  Many people love Yesterday's Enterprise also, but I think it's just good.  The first three I listed are simply brilliant IMO.
  16. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Lord Liaden in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    <
    Well, I wouldn't argue with anyone who said it was one of the top 10. TOS episodes were varied enough that they achieved excellence in different ways, allowing no single "best."
     
    Dean Shomshak
  17. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Scott Ruggels in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    ANYWAY... When I recently re-watched "Catspaw" (the "trick or treat" episode with Korob and Sylvia), I found it extra-amusing for  reasons that had nothing to do with the show itself.
     
    See, the game Exalted has creatures called the Fair Folk -- their version of elves and faeries. The Fair Folk are creatures of primordial Chaos that have taken humanoid form to exist in Creation. To survive in Creation, they must feed on human souls. And one of their ways of doing this is to lure humans into acting out stories with them. Beyond such necessities, though, story roles are how they create identities. They are masks without faces behind them; they can only pretend to be real.
     
    Korob and Sylvia are surprisingly good models for Fair Folk. Sylvia has her identity all worked out as sensual villainess. Korob is shiftier. Through the episode, he keeps trying out different roles: sinister magus, tester of morals, finally repentant but doomed ally, as Kirk et al fail to play along.
     
    The pair even admit they need other people to give them form and roles to play.
     
    Even the ending fits the pattern. Gosh, all they had to do was break the magic wand? That was easy. But classic fairy tale. And then it was all just make-believe... except for crewman Jackson being dead. Korob and Sylvia seem to be dead, too... or is that just more of the role-playing?
     
    "Catspaw" was written by Robert Bloch, who got his start as a friend and disciple of H. P. Lovecraft. As an encounter with the wholly alien, the ep is a pretty fair Lovecraftian homage, even if it doesn't have the usual slime and tentacles.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  18. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Drhoz in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    ANYWAY... When I recently re-watched "Catspaw" (the "trick or treat" episode with Korob and Sylvia), I found it extra-amusing for  reasons that had nothing to do with the show itself.
     
    See, the game Exalted has creatures called the Fair Folk -- their version of elves and faeries. The Fair Folk are creatures of primordial Chaos that have taken humanoid form to exist in Creation. To survive in Creation, they must feed on human souls. And one of their ways of doing this is to lure humans into acting out stories with them. Beyond such necessities, though, story roles are how they create identities. They are masks without faces behind them; they can only pretend to be real.
     
    Korob and Sylvia are surprisingly good models for Fair Folk. Sylvia has her identity all worked out as sensual villainess. Korob is shiftier. Through the episode, he keeps trying out different roles: sinister magus, tester of morals, finally repentant but doomed ally, as Kirk et al fail to play along.
     
    The pair even admit they need other people to give them form and roles to play.
     
    Even the ending fits the pattern. Gosh, all they had to do was break the magic wand? That was easy. But classic fairy tale. And then it was all just make-believe... except for crewman Jackson being dead. Korob and Sylvia seem to be dead, too... or is that just more of the role-playing?
     
    "Catspaw" was written by Robert Bloch, who got his start as a friend and disciple of H. P. Lovecraft. As an encounter with the wholly alien, the ep is a pretty fair Lovecraftian homage, even if it doesn't have the usual slime and tentacles.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  19. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Drhoz in Star Trek (The Original Series): What's the Best Episode?   
    I loathe The Omega Glory for the same reason I loathe Bread and Circuses and Miri. Alternate history is fun, but the idea that there's an actual other Earth out in space, or a planet whose inhabitants replicated Earth history to the point of precisely copying the Roman Empire or the exact wording of the U. S. Constitution, makes me go, "No, that's ridiculous." Exact other-humans is enough of a stretch; I will grant the effort to explain it away through hints that aliens transplanted human colonies to other worlds. At least Nazi World and Chicago Mobster World had defined points of recent interference.
     
    Whatever worth Omega Glory has as a story, for me that revelation at the ending turns it all to crap.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  20. Haha
    DShomshak reacted to Chris Goodwin in Wondering if I'm alone here   
    I've always thought those were meant for our more... hygienically challenged brethren.  A die as a reward for using the soap!  
  21. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Chris Goodwin in Wondering if I'm alone here   
    Some years back, my FLGS sold novelty soap in the shape of a d20, with an actual d20 at the center of the clear soap. I bought one for a Christmas present for my niece, who counts soapmaking and Pathfinder among her hobbies.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  22. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Spence in Wondering if I'm alone here   
    Some years back, my FLGS sold novelty soap in the shape of a d20, with an actual d20 at the center of the clear soap. I bought one for a Christmas present for my niece, who counts soapmaking and Pathfinder among her hobbies.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  23. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Duke Bushido in Wondering if I'm alone here   
    Some years back, my FLGS sold novelty soap in the shape of a d20, with an actual d20 at the center of the clear soap. I bought one for a Christmas present for my niece, who counts soapmaking and Pathfinder among her hobbies.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  24. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Lord Liaden in Totally Mundane to Secret Magic Campaign   
    IIRC back in the '70s there was talk of "ESPionage" programs in the US, USSR and likely other places. The PCs could find threads reaching back to one such ESPionage program. That got weirder than attempts at finding Russian submarines through remote viewing. (If possible, browse through Kenneth Hite's "Suppressed Transmissions" columns for Pyramid magazine. Urban fantasy, alternate history and hidden history are specialties of his.). But leads on investigation keep getting cut off. People involved in the long-ago-project, who for some reason the PCs want to talk to about something apparently mundane, died mysteriously but in ways that could have been faked. Records that should exist, don't. Etc. Eventually the PCs' searhing for information makes someone nervous, who starts pushing back. Eventually they realize there's something genuinely supernatural and otherworldly behid the mysteries and cutouts.
     
    You might also find inspiration from the Delta Green supplements for Call of Cthulhu.
     
    Secrets, deception, hidden dangers -- espionage and the mystical go together like peanut butter and jelly.
     
    Of course the PCs can also find some "Scoobie Doo" scenarios where spies are making a hoax of supernatural events as a way to extract information, manipulate a community, or whatever.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  25. Like
    DShomshak reacted to Old Man in More space news!   
    Managed to see it on the one night we weren’t socked in. It wasn’t terribly impressive due to the light pollution and scattered clouds, but my kid was fascinated by it so that was cool. 
×
×
  • Create New...