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DShomshak

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  1. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Duke Bushido in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    <curious> Such as? I've been out of comics for a while, but as of the time I stopped reading Marvel (1990s) I don't recall there being any mutants who simply looked different. OTOH there were lots of mutants with dangerous powers who looked like ordinary humans. Most of them, in fact.
     
    Okay, I can see the parallel quasi-reasoning:
     
    "Some gangbangers are Black. Theefor, I believe that all Black people are gangbangers. I shall ignore all the Black people who aren't gangbangers, and all the gangbangers who aren't Black."
     
    goes to:
     
    "Some mutants are dangerous supervillains. Therefor, I believe all mutants are dangerous supervillains. I shall ignore all the mutants who aren't dangerous supervillains, and all the dangerous supervillains who aren't mutants."
     
    I still think it falls down because, based on the characters presented, most mutants have powers that would make them extremely dangerous if they chose to be: more so than even the most suicidally determined, non-super human being.
     
    It might have emotionally rang true to me if Marvel had shown more instances of super-powered people being falsely accused of being mutants. (I remember one instance, but that's it.) So perhaps it isn't the bigotry that rings false to me, as the apparent magical power that people have to tell that a mutant character is a mutant and not some other sort of superhuman.
     
    (In my own campaign settings, there are a few "mutant suremacists" because there's no idea so crazy that someone won't believe it, but most people regard mutants with envious admiration for their luck in being born with super-powers. People hope they are mutants too, who just haven't discovered their powers yet. OTOH, in my worlds there are no handy-dandy "mutant detectors" -- the only way to tell is a detailed genetic analysis -- so "muytant" often means merely, "I don't know why I have powers.")
     
    Dean Shomshak
  2. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Opal in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    <curious> Such as? I've been out of comics for a while, but as of the time I stopped reading Marvel (1990s) I don't recall there being any mutants who simply looked different. OTOH there were lots of mutants with dangerous powers who looked like ordinary humans. Most of them, in fact.
     
    Okay, I can see the parallel quasi-reasoning:
     
    "Some gangbangers are Black. Theefor, I believe that all Black people are gangbangers. I shall ignore all the Black people who aren't gangbangers, and all the gangbangers who aren't Black."
     
    goes to:
     
    "Some mutants are dangerous supervillains. Therefor, I believe all mutants are dangerous supervillains. I shall ignore all the mutants who aren't dangerous supervillains, and all the dangerous supervillains who aren't mutants."
     
    I still think it falls down because, based on the characters presented, most mutants have powers that would make them extremely dangerous if they chose to be: more so than even the most suicidally determined, non-super human being.
     
    It might have emotionally rang true to me if Marvel had shown more instances of super-powered people being falsely accused of being mutants. (I remember one instance, but that's it.) So perhaps it isn't the bigotry that rings false to me, as the apparent magical power that people have to tell that a mutant character is a mutant and not some other sort of superhuman.
     
    (In my own campaign settings, there are a few "mutant suremacists" because there's no idea so crazy that someone won't believe it, but most people regard mutants with envious admiration for their luck in being born with super-powers. People hope they are mutants too, who just haven't discovered their powers yet. OTOH, in my worlds there are no handy-dandy "mutant detectors" -- the only way to tell is a detailed genetic analysis -- so "muytant" often means merely, "I don't know why I have powers.")
     
    Dean Shomshak
  3. Like
    DShomshak reacted to Christopher R Taylor in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Yeah, like I stated earlier, there's a huge jump between "i dislike you because you look different/talk different etc" and "I dislike you because you are powerful enough to melt my brain"
     
    Mutants aren't just odd looking or unusual.  They are actually, materially dangerous.  And they are going to supplant and replace non mutants according to Marvel Evolutionary Theory.  That's a huge difference from "I don't like you because you're from Nebraska".  That's an actual threat to my peoples' existence.
     
    There's good reason and logical basis for fear of mutants in the Marvel universe, its not just mindless, content less, irrational hate.  Especially when you factor in all the thousands of times mutants actually have threatened huge bodies of people, if not the entire planet.
     
    And at the same time, because almost no mutants look any different than anyone else, there's no reason why people should hate them and embrace other superheroes as happens constantly in the Marvel Universe.  In this context, there's no difference between Captain America and Dazzler: both have done great things and protected people, both are attractive and noble, both are consistently heroic (with a few mind control bad moments).  Cap is beloved and honored, Dazzler is hated.  For no other reason than "we want to push the anti mutant thing for plot reasons."
     
    See, what I'm saying here is that no matter how much propaganda you put out, or what cool slogans you whipped up, people would not differentiate between mutant and non-mutant.  They'd fear and hate every superhero.
  4. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Steve in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    <curious> Such as? I've been out of comics for a while, but as of the time I stopped reading Marvel (1990s) I don't recall there being any mutants who simply looked different. OTOH there were lots of mutants with dangerous powers who looked like ordinary humans. Most of them, in fact.
     
    Okay, I can see the parallel quasi-reasoning:
     
    "Some gangbangers are Black. Theefor, I believe that all Black people are gangbangers. I shall ignore all the Black people who aren't gangbangers, and all the gangbangers who aren't Black."
     
    goes to:
     
    "Some mutants are dangerous supervillains. Therefor, I believe all mutants are dangerous supervillains. I shall ignore all the mutants who aren't dangerous supervillains, and all the dangerous supervillains who aren't mutants."
     
    I still think it falls down because, based on the characters presented, most mutants have powers that would make them extremely dangerous if they chose to be: more so than even the most suicidally determined, non-super human being.
     
    It might have emotionally rang true to me if Marvel had shown more instances of super-powered people being falsely accused of being mutants. (I remember one instance, but that's it.) So perhaps it isn't the bigotry that rings false to me, as the apparent magical power that people have to tell that a mutant character is a mutant and not some other sort of superhuman.
     
    (In my own campaign settings, there are a few "mutant suremacists" because there's no idea so crazy that someone won't believe it, but most people regard mutants with envious admiration for their luck in being born with super-powers. People hope they are mutants too, who just haven't discovered their powers yet. OTOH, in my worlds there are no handy-dandy "mutant detectors" -- the only way to tell is a detailed genetic analysis -- so "muytant" often means merely, "I don't know why I have powers.")
     
    Dean Shomshak
  5. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Steve in Pest Control in a Superhuman World   
    One of my last "Avant Guard" campaign adventures included a bit of super-pest control. The PCs had offended the mad super-biologist Helix by trying to plant a nuke in his base. He found it, disarmed it, and decided to return it to sender with an announcement that it would go off in New York City in a few hours. And he suggested people would let him destroy the city, in order to limit the damage from the genetic abominations invading the city... some of them contagious.
     
    One PC had recently acquired an apprentice of sorts, a young mystic who'd crafted a Blasting Rod that, as per the description in the grimoires, could do weather control. The apprentice (tentatively using the pseduonym Stave) insisted on coming along to fight the monsters, and a good thing too: As the PCs gather, they see a cloud erupt from the summit of the Chrysler building. They know it's a swarm of hornets engineered to carry Helix Fever, one of Helix's engineered plagues. They have no way to fight a giant insect swarm.
     
    Then Stave says, "I've got this." He raises the Blasting Rod, recites a Bible verse (Matthew 8:24 if anyone's interested), and concentrates as clouds swiftly gather overhead for a Turn, and KABOOM! With a roar of continuous thunder and lightning, the clouds drop a deluge of rain driven by a gale-force wind aimed straight down. The Helix Fever hornets are swept from the sky to be crushed against buildings and pavement, and drowned in the driving rain. (All done through Change Environment.)
     
    A minute later, the Blasting Rod splinters and the storm stops, but Stave is exultant. Nearby people had caught all this on their phones, and Stave -- true child of the social media age -- leans into one to say, "See that? Thant's magic! You think you're all that, Helix, but  I just owned you!"
     
    The PCs then saved the city, but they are sure Helix will not take Stave's declaration in good humor. We shall see how this develops.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  6. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Christopher R Taylor in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    <curious> Such as? I've been out of comics for a while, but as of the time I stopped reading Marvel (1990s) I don't recall there being any mutants who simply looked different. OTOH there were lots of mutants with dangerous powers who looked like ordinary humans. Most of them, in fact.
     
    Okay, I can see the parallel quasi-reasoning:
     
    "Some gangbangers are Black. Theefor, I believe that all Black people are gangbangers. I shall ignore all the Black people who aren't gangbangers, and all the gangbangers who aren't Black."
     
    goes to:
     
    "Some mutants are dangerous supervillains. Therefor, I believe all mutants are dangerous supervillains. I shall ignore all the mutants who aren't dangerous supervillains, and all the dangerous supervillains who aren't mutants."
     
    I still think it falls down because, based on the characters presented, most mutants have powers that would make them extremely dangerous if they chose to be: more so than even the most suicidally determined, non-super human being.
     
    It might have emotionally rang true to me if Marvel had shown more instances of super-powered people being falsely accused of being mutants. (I remember one instance, but that's it.) So perhaps it isn't the bigotry that rings false to me, as the apparent magical power that people have to tell that a mutant character is a mutant and not some other sort of superhuman.
     
    (In my own campaign settings, there are a few "mutant suremacists" because there's no idea so crazy that someone won't believe it, but most people regard mutants with envious admiration for their luck in being born with super-powers. People hope they are mutants too, who just haven't discovered their powers yet. OTOH, in my worlds there are no handy-dandy "mutant detectors" -- the only way to tell is a detailed genetic analysis -- so "muytant" often means merely, "I don't know why I have powers.")
     
    Dean Shomshak
  7. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Lord Liaden in Pest Control in a Superhuman World   
    One of my last "Avant Guard" campaign adventures included a bit of super-pest control. The PCs had offended the mad super-biologist Helix by trying to plant a nuke in his base. He found it, disarmed it, and decided to return it to sender with an announcement that it would go off in New York City in a few hours. And he suggested people would let him destroy the city, in order to limit the damage from the genetic abominations invading the city... some of them contagious.
     
    One PC had recently acquired an apprentice of sorts, a young mystic who'd crafted a Blasting Rod that, as per the description in the grimoires, could do weather control. The apprentice (tentatively using the pseduonym Stave) insisted on coming along to fight the monsters, and a good thing too: As the PCs gather, they see a cloud erupt from the summit of the Chrysler building. They know it's a swarm of hornets engineered to carry Helix Fever, one of Helix's engineered plagues. They have no way to fight a giant insect swarm.
     
    Then Stave says, "I've got this." He raises the Blasting Rod, recites a Bible verse (Matthew 8:24 if anyone's interested), and concentrates as clouds swiftly gather overhead for a Turn, and KABOOM! With a roar of continuous thunder and lightning, the clouds drop a deluge of rain driven by a gale-force wind aimed straight down. The Helix Fever hornets are swept from the sky to be crushed against buildings and pavement, and drowned in the driving rain. (All done through Change Environment.)
     
    A minute later, the Blasting Rod splinters and the storm stops, but Stave is exultant. Nearby people had caught all this on their phones, and Stave -- true child of the social media age -- leans into one to say, "See that? Thant's magic! You think you're all that, Helix, but  I just owned you!"
     
    The PCs then saved the city, but they are sure Helix will not take Stave's declaration in good humor. We shall see how this develops.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  8. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Christopher R Taylor in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Well... The early issues of X-Men that I've read didn't have anything I recognized as "Metaphor for other bigotry." It looked to me more like a nod to Atomnic Horror -- mutants swere appearing because of radiation from fallout. Charles Xavier's father was a pioneering physicist in atomic research, Krakoa the Living Island, etc.
     
    "The children are scary different" trope circulating in the 1960s as well. Midwich Cuckoos. Childhood's End. "Little Anthony." A natural time for such a tropoe, since many parents did find their children turning alien, rejecting the traditions and loyalties the parents revered. As Opal says, every generation faces replacement by their offspring -- but to many people, this became a whole lot scarier.
     
    Not that this helped the comic. X-Men was cancelled, first time around. The trope didn't mean anything to the young readers.
     
    No, I think the hevy-handed equation of "anti-mutant hysteria" with racism, homophobia, antisemitism, etc. came a bit later. 1980s or so.
     
    And as mentioned, it falls down. It isn't irrational to fear people who are living weapons of mass destruction.
     
    Gotta agree with Duke Bushido here: The real appeal of Marvel-style mutants is the fantasy that anyone, even you, might suddenly discover you had super-powers. You can't be a castaway alien like Superman, or a billionaire like Batman, go on a rocketship ride like the Fantastic Four or learn the mystic arts in Tibet like Dr. Strange. Just >ping< you find you are special. As special as every adolescent thinks theyt are, and as unfairly treated.
     
    Now, this approach to mutants could be developed in a way that's not so flattering to teenage narcissism. As you transition from child to adult, you do gain power. You affect the world and the people around you. You can make choices tht matter a whole lot more -- and that you might not be able to take back. Some people use that new power well, even heroically, like Malala Yousefzai. Others use it very badly, like school shooters.
     
    I don't know if that would sell as well. But then, comics are no longer so much a youth medium. (Or anything but a "farm team" for movie scripts I suppose, but that's another rant.) But it's a kind of story that's been told for millennia. I doubt it will every really go out of style.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  9. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from assault in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Well... The early issues of X-Men that I've read didn't have anything I recognized as "Metaphor for other bigotry." It looked to me more like a nod to Atomnic Horror -- mutants swere appearing because of radiation from fallout. Charles Xavier's father was a pioneering physicist in atomic research, Krakoa the Living Island, etc.
     
    "The children are scary different" trope circulating in the 1960s as well. Midwich Cuckoos. Childhood's End. "Little Anthony." A natural time for such a tropoe, since many parents did find their children turning alien, rejecting the traditions and loyalties the parents revered. As Opal says, every generation faces replacement by their offspring -- but to many people, this became a whole lot scarier.
     
    Not that this helped the comic. X-Men was cancelled, first time around. The trope didn't mean anything to the young readers.
     
    No, I think the hevy-handed equation of "anti-mutant hysteria" with racism, homophobia, antisemitism, etc. came a bit later. 1980s or so.
     
    And as mentioned, it falls down. It isn't irrational to fear people who are living weapons of mass destruction.
     
    Gotta agree with Duke Bushido here: The real appeal of Marvel-style mutants is the fantasy that anyone, even you, might suddenly discover you had super-powers. You can't be a castaway alien like Superman, or a billionaire like Batman, go on a rocketship ride like the Fantastic Four or learn the mystic arts in Tibet like Dr. Strange. Just >ping< you find you are special. As special as every adolescent thinks theyt are, and as unfairly treated.
     
    Now, this approach to mutants could be developed in a way that's not so flattering to teenage narcissism. As you transition from child to adult, you do gain power. You affect the world and the people around you. You can make choices tht matter a whole lot more -- and that you might not be able to take back. Some people use that new power well, even heroically, like Malala Yousefzai. Others use it very badly, like school shooters.
     
    I don't know if that would sell as well. But then, comics are no longer so much a youth medium. (Or anything but a "farm team" for movie scripts I suppose, but that's another rant.) But it's a kind of story that's been told for millennia. I doubt it will every really go out of style.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  10. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Steve in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Well... The early issues of X-Men that I've read didn't have anything I recognized as "Metaphor for other bigotry." It looked to me more like a nod to Atomnic Horror -- mutants swere appearing because of radiation from fallout. Charles Xavier's father was a pioneering physicist in atomic research, Krakoa the Living Island, etc.
     
    "The children are scary different" trope circulating in the 1960s as well. Midwich Cuckoos. Childhood's End. "Little Anthony." A natural time for such a tropoe, since many parents did find their children turning alien, rejecting the traditions and loyalties the parents revered. As Opal says, every generation faces replacement by their offspring -- but to many people, this became a whole lot scarier.
     
    Not that this helped the comic. X-Men was cancelled, first time around. The trope didn't mean anything to the young readers.
     
    No, I think the hevy-handed equation of "anti-mutant hysteria" with racism, homophobia, antisemitism, etc. came a bit later. 1980s or so.
     
    And as mentioned, it falls down. It isn't irrational to fear people who are living weapons of mass destruction.
     
    Gotta agree with Duke Bushido here: The real appeal of Marvel-style mutants is the fantasy that anyone, even you, might suddenly discover you had super-powers. You can't be a castaway alien like Superman, or a billionaire like Batman, go on a rocketship ride like the Fantastic Four or learn the mystic arts in Tibet like Dr. Strange. Just >ping< you find you are special. As special as every adolescent thinks theyt are, and as unfairly treated.
     
    Now, this approach to mutants could be developed in a way that's not so flattering to teenage narcissism. As you transition from child to adult, you do gain power. You affect the world and the people around you. You can make choices tht matter a whole lot more -- and that you might not be able to take back. Some people use that new power well, even heroically, like Malala Yousefzai. Others use it very badly, like school shooters.
     
    I don't know if that would sell as well. But then, comics are no longer so much a youth medium. (Or anything but a "farm team" for movie scripts I suppose, but that's another rant.) But it's a kind of story that's been told for millennia. I doubt it will every really go out of style.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  11. Thanks
    DShomshak got a reaction from Duke Bushido in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Well... The early issues of X-Men that I've read didn't have anything I recognized as "Metaphor for other bigotry." It looked to me more like a nod to Atomnic Horror -- mutants swere appearing because of radiation from fallout. Charles Xavier's father was a pioneering physicist in atomic research, Krakoa the Living Island, etc.
     
    "The children are scary different" trope circulating in the 1960s as well. Midwich Cuckoos. Childhood's End. "Little Anthony." A natural time for such a tropoe, since many parents did find their children turning alien, rejecting the traditions and loyalties the parents revered. As Opal says, every generation faces replacement by their offspring -- but to many people, this became a whole lot scarier.
     
    Not that this helped the comic. X-Men was cancelled, first time around. The trope didn't mean anything to the young readers.
     
    No, I think the hevy-handed equation of "anti-mutant hysteria" with racism, homophobia, antisemitism, etc. came a bit later. 1980s or so.
     
    And as mentioned, it falls down. It isn't irrational to fear people who are living weapons of mass destruction.
     
    Gotta agree with Duke Bushido here: The real appeal of Marvel-style mutants is the fantasy that anyone, even you, might suddenly discover you had super-powers. You can't be a castaway alien like Superman, or a billionaire like Batman, go on a rocketship ride like the Fantastic Four or learn the mystic arts in Tibet like Dr. Strange. Just >ping< you find you are special. As special as every adolescent thinks theyt are, and as unfairly treated.
     
    Now, this approach to mutants could be developed in a way that's not so flattering to teenage narcissism. As you transition from child to adult, you do gain power. You affect the world and the people around you. You can make choices tht matter a whole lot more -- and that you might not be able to take back. Some people use that new power well, even heroically, like Malala Yousefzai. Others use it very badly, like school shooters.
     
    I don't know if that would sell as well. But then, comics are no longer so much a youth medium. (Or anything but a "farm team" for movie scripts I suppose, but that's another rant.) But it's a kind of story that's been told for millennia. I doubt it will every really go out of style.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  12. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Lord Liaden in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Last week, the NYTimes program "The Daily" talked to a reporter who has studied and interviewed Joe Manchin, trying to figure out what guides the thinking of the man who essentially has become the US Senate. The reporter says Manchin appears quite genuine in his belief that legislation must be bipartisan, the Senate must be collegial, and if you can't get a single Republican to back a Democratic bill then the Dems must be too extreme and unreasonable.
     
    These are the politics he learned from his mentor Seb. Robert Byrd, who was once considered the "institutional memory" of the Senate. Manchin doesn't seem to have accepted that the Republican Party of today is not the Republican Party of Byrd's day. That it's possible the reason the other fellow won't meet you halfway is because he's crazy -- or no longer interested in politics at all.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  13. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Lord Liaden in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Well... The early issues of X-Men that I've read didn't have anything I recognized as "Metaphor for other bigotry." It looked to me more like a nod to Atomnic Horror -- mutants swere appearing because of radiation from fallout. Charles Xavier's father was a pioneering physicist in atomic research, Krakoa the Living Island, etc.
     
    "The children are scary different" trope circulating in the 1960s as well. Midwich Cuckoos. Childhood's End. "Little Anthony." A natural time for such a tropoe, since many parents did find their children turning alien, rejecting the traditions and loyalties the parents revered. As Opal says, every generation faces replacement by their offspring -- but to many people, this became a whole lot scarier.
     
    Not that this helped the comic. X-Men was cancelled, first time around. The trope didn't mean anything to the young readers.
     
    No, I think the hevy-handed equation of "anti-mutant hysteria" with racism, homophobia, antisemitism, etc. came a bit later. 1980s or so.
     
    And as mentioned, it falls down. It isn't irrational to fear people who are living weapons of mass destruction.
     
    Gotta agree with Duke Bushido here: The real appeal of Marvel-style mutants is the fantasy that anyone, even you, might suddenly discover you had super-powers. You can't be a castaway alien like Superman, or a billionaire like Batman, go on a rocketship ride like the Fantastic Four or learn the mystic arts in Tibet like Dr. Strange. Just >ping< you find you are special. As special as every adolescent thinks theyt are, and as unfairly treated.
     
    Now, this approach to mutants could be developed in a way that's not so flattering to teenage narcissism. As you transition from child to adult, you do gain power. You affect the world and the people around you. You can make choices tht matter a whole lot more -- and that you might not be able to take back. Some people use that new power well, even heroically, like Malala Yousefzai. Others use it very badly, like school shooters.
     
    I don't know if that would sell as well. But then, comics are no longer so much a youth medium. (Or anything but a "farm team" for movie scripts I suppose, but that's another rant.) But it's a kind of story that's been told for millennia. I doubt it will every really go out of style.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  14. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from tkdguy in What Fiction Book (other than Science Fiction or Fantasy) have you recently finished?   
    G. K. Chesterton, The Adventures of Father Brown and The Amazing Adventures of Father Brown. The original sleuth priest. Social attitudes have changed a bit, as have literary styles (Chesterton's auctorial commentary about various classes of people are, hm, intrusive), but still some very clever mysteries, with writing that is often witty. Occasionally gets deeper into questions of moral responsibility: Sometimes the point of the story is not merely solving the crime, but figuring out what the crime *is* and what to do about it.
     
    Gamers might mine the stories for situations to adapt. Of particular use, many stories are "Scoobie-Doo" mysteries in which something supernatural seems to be happening, but Father Brown exposes the deception. (Because of this aspect, I already mentioned the Father Brown mysteries in the SF/Fantasy thread, because theat was the thread I could find. Now that this thread has resurfaced, I can post more accurately.)
     
    Since the Father Brown mysteries are old enough to be public domain, you can find them online, and there are more than in these two collections.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  15. Thanks
    DShomshak reacted to TrickstaPriest in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    It's prescribed for ADHD, which is (to me) the leading 'thing' I'd think he has.
     
    Then again adderall abuse is not great, and long term consequences of overuse for that class of stimulants can apparently include mania and paranoia?  I might be wrong on this.
  16. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from L. Marcus in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    If Donald Trump has incontinence issues, I neither mock nor condemn him for that. I only mock and condemn him for his moral attributes. We cannot always control our bodies. We can always control our morals. No matter what culture we are born into or how twisted our upbringing, we can choose whether to be kind or cruel, generous or greedy, loyal or treacherous, modest or proud. I have seen this in my own friends. People suffering utter deprivation or hemmed in by horror have behaved well. Donald Trump, blessed with every social and material advantage, has not.
     
    (Though if Trump is addicted to adderall, that probably falls under morals. I doubt that there's a medical need or that anyone held a gun to his head to make him take the drug.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
     
     
  17. Thanks
    DShomshak got a reaction from TrickstaPriest in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    If Donald Trump has incontinence issues, I neither mock nor condemn him for that. I only mock and condemn him for his moral attributes. We cannot always control our bodies. We can always control our morals. No matter what culture we are born into or how twisted our upbringing, we can choose whether to be kind or cruel, generous or greedy, loyal or treacherous, modest or proud. I have seen this in my own friends. People suffering utter deprivation or hemmed in by horror have behaved well. Donald Trump, blessed with every social and material advantage, has not.
     
    (Though if Trump is addicted to adderall, that probably falls under morals. I doubt that there's a medical need or that anyone held a gun to his head to make him take the drug.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
     
     
  18. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Iuz the Evil in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Friends who claim to know more about Reagan than I do add another difference: Whatever his politics, Reagan liked people, or at least a lot of people. He didn't live in a Trumpian world of fear, calculated cruelty and vindictive rage. (Cannot so vouch for some of the people around him.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
  19. Haha
    DShomshak got a reaction from Opal in Online Media in a Superhuman World   
    Back in my old "Seattle Sentinels" campaign world, one PC greatly disliked the fan site devoted to the nude video posted by a really annoying prankster villain: alt.bluejay.nudevideo.pant.pant.pant. Yes, this was waaay back in the days of Usenet.
     
    But of course there was plenty of other super-porn, mostly clumsy cut-and-paste jobs splicing the heads of heroes and villains onto existing porn. And if anyone with actual super-powers was in the biz... Nah, let's not go there, it's a family-friendly forum.
     
    The supervillain Blitz had an annoying online presence, too, but for different reasons. Though he was the mutant progeny of twisted Nazi eugenics, and raised to serve the setting's HYDRA/VIPER homage, his martial arts sifus inadvertantly gave him many admirable qualities. Plus, male-model gorgeous (see: twisted Nazi eugenics). There were fan sites devoted to him -- to which he sometimes posted fitness and self-defense videos and urged young people to stay off drugs. All very annoying to heroes, especially to those who care that Blitz had a bigger fan club than they did. Kind of annoying to the evil world-spanning criminal conspiracy as well, caught in the paradox that they are bad guys but everyone likes good publicity.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  20. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Ternaugh in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Friends who claim to know more about Reagan than I do add another difference: Whatever his politics, Reagan liked people, or at least a lot of people. He didn't live in a Trumpian world of fear, calculated cruelty and vindictive rage. (Cannot so vouch for some of the people around him.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
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    DShomshak got a reaction from wcw43921 in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Friends who claim to know more about Reagan than I do add another difference: Whatever his politics, Reagan liked people, or at least a lot of people. He didn't live in a Trumpian world of fear, calculated cruelty and vindictive rage. (Cannot so vouch for some of the people around him.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
  22. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from Pariah in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Friends who claim to know more about Reagan than I do add another difference: Whatever his politics, Reagan liked people, or at least a lot of people. He didn't live in a Trumpian world of fear, calculated cruelty and vindictive rage. (Cannot so vouch for some of the people around him.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
  23. Like
    DShomshak got a reaction from pinecone in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    Friends who claim to know more about Reagan than I do add another difference: Whatever his politics, Reagan liked people, or at least a lot of people. He didn't live in a Trumpian world of fear, calculated cruelty and vindictive rage. (Cannot so vouch for some of the people around him.)
     
    Dean Shomshak
  24. Haha
    DShomshak reacted to Starlord in Political Discussion Thread (With Rules)   
    In my experience all my Trump loving acquaintances spend half their time on Facebook complaining about how much they hate Facebook and that they're leaving Facebook, yet I still see them posting day after day, month after month, year after year....
  25. Thanks
    DShomshak got a reaction from Tjack in Online Media in a Superhuman World   
    Back in my old "Seattle Sentinels" campaign world, one PC greatly disliked the fan site devoted to the nude video posted by a really annoying prankster villain: alt.bluejay.nudevideo.pant.pant.pant. Yes, this was waaay back in the days of Usenet.
     
    But of course there was plenty of other super-porn, mostly clumsy cut-and-paste jobs splicing the heads of heroes and villains onto existing porn. And if anyone with actual super-powers was in the biz... Nah, let's not go there, it's a family-friendly forum.
     
    The supervillain Blitz had an annoying online presence, too, but for different reasons. Though he was the mutant progeny of twisted Nazi eugenics, and raised to serve the setting's HYDRA/VIPER homage, his martial arts sifus inadvertantly gave him many admirable qualities. Plus, male-model gorgeous (see: twisted Nazi eugenics). There were fan sites devoted to him -- to which he sometimes posted fitness and self-defense videos and urged young people to stay off drugs. All very annoying to heroes, especially to those who care that Blitz had a bigger fan club than they did. Kind of annoying to the evil world-spanning criminal conspiracy as well, caught in the paradox that they are bad guys but everyone likes good publicity.
     
    Dean Shomshak
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