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Manic Typist

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  1. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to TranquiloUno in Gods in RPGs   
    The moons in my world act as kinda...transformative magical dynamos. Pulling in raw solar energy\magic and transforming it in to more abstract forms\colors. 
     
    Gods are creatures that have acquired various lunar artifacts that allow them to directly tap that lunar power.
    The catch being that the more of these artifacts you can find and bond to the more your personality becomes warped by them. 
    The primary way they warp personalities is to drive them to acquire more power and lunar artifacts and control and to project their lunar influence on the world. And to make them more than a little paranoid (reasonably expecting that all other gods are in fact plotting against them).  
     
    I'd specifically wanted fairly weak gods in contrast to typical (ie, D&D) fantasy RPGs. I think of the tougher ones as being kinda on the level of JLA members (Bryne era Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, etc). Or maybe like The Dominator from The Black Company novels.
     
    So they are driven to gain power and influence the world. But while\if they are on the planet they are vulnerable. Super tough, but vulnerable. 
    But while they on on their moons they are unable to directly effect events. 
     
    Priests can then channel through their connection to a lunar deity. In return for doing the gods will and abiding by the psycho-spiritual nature of the moon in question. 
     
    So the end result is gods that are both "weak" and active. They tend to have specific kingdoms\realms they have a patron relationship with and can directly channel lunar power to their chosen priests (provided their moon is in LOS to said priest) if they choose. Potentially burning the priests out in an excitingly literal way.
     
    They then drive these kingdoms\heroes\etc to do their will. And also secretly hunt down more lunar artifacts. Both to bond them (if of their own moon) or to hide them from the other gods of the other moons. 
     
    The Great Northern Church of Hexor is fighting Ostermark for control of The Labyrinth because both Hexor (the god) and Illisius (patron god of Ostermark) know there are lunar artifacts (and other nasty magics their mortal followers can use on each other) there. 
    The Grey Elves had Boccob (god of the purple moon) as their patron and were able to create the Sathen Empire because of that patronage (and to serve his purposes). 
     
    That kinda thing.
     
    But they can die, is the point. And be replaced. And are magically warped to crave power and influence.
    And while they've got loads of resources and mortal orgs and immortal secret knowledge of the world secrets and hidden treasures and magical caches on the planet they are personally only 350-500pt supers (5th) in a world of 225pt (max-ish) mortal types. 
     
    I'd kinda modeled them off of aspects of The Star Rider from The Dread Empire books, the JLA, the aforementioned The Dominator, and the idea that gods could be statted out...and killed. There's nothing special or extra-rules-y about them. 
     
     
  2. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Ternaugh in Gods in RPGs   
    The gods in my campaign are the remnants of the AIs that ran the ships and terraforming devices used in the initial waves of colonization, and later, the various utilities that allowed the ancient cities to function (think of magic as a form of broadcast power). Most have faded away over the eons, but a few remain, if you know where to look.
     
    The hidden background of the setting assumed that the various fantasy races are actually genetically-modified humans. Dwarves were meant to be heavy-worlder miners, elves were originally modified for a lower gravity, and so on.
  3. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Ninja-Bear in Arcane Combat Value   
    Because it’s magic? Not being a wiseacre but to me that’s all the justification I need. Do you poke at this the same way as Super Heroes? I have super strength. The GM says why? I say Gamma radiation? GM says ok...... ? Is there really a difference?
  4. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Chris Goodwin in Arcane Combat Value   
    I'm not a wizard, so I don't know...
     
    In 6th edition, we've divorced CV and MCV from their former parent Characteristics, so we can kind of use special effects to represent them.  For instance, we could translate D&D fighter types by giving them bonus OCV, Melee Only (-1), representing using their Strength to power through their target's defenses.  
     
    Shouldn't a highly skilled and powerful wizard be reliant not on their frail, rickety, low-DEX body, but on their INT, EGO, and great knowledge of and connection to the mystical sphere?  That's what Arcane Combat Value represents.  
     
    So, the answer to your question is "That's up to the player's SFX or the GM's magic system." 
  5. Thanks
    Manic Typist reacted to Scott Ruggels in What do long term FH Characters look like   
    I have a binder full of old Hero characters, the a Majority of them FH characters. I am busy tomorrow, Friday I will scan and upload a couple of characters as examples. What I would do is to keep everything of that character in the same sheet protector, so that progress can be compared, and I had a lower point total version of the character for convention games. Character sketches as well. ( one side was the character sheet and the other was character art. ) 
  6. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Brennall in Tabletop Simulator   
    I have been working on a Workshop mod for the Hero System.
     
     
    Here you can see the dice roller (with body counter) in action in TTS
     
     
  7. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from bigbywolfe in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    It sounds like you're in violent agreement with me, since that is an alternative way of stating what I said.
     
    You asked, after no one suggested this was the case, if PCs can't Abort when Cover is in play. I noted that, once a Cover is successful, that is the case... because that means the attack has happened, and the standard rules for Aborting apply (as always).
     
    That is all.
  8. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from bigbywolfe in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    ...actually, they kind of do. The player was told that their opponent was making an attack against them. If they don't declare Abort before the attack, then they don't get to do it afterward. You can't abort to a Dodge after you know the opponent hit you in the hopes that your DCV will make the difference.
     
    Remember, with Cover, the PC has already been hit. It's just damage hasn't been rolled yet.
     
    Also, as a general aside... I've only ever played Champions once. I was introduced, have GMed, and with one session exception only ever played NON-supers games. I view equating HERO with supers as erroneous - it's a legacy that's there, but Champions =/= HERO.
     
    Though I still do want to build a PC who can survive a fall at terminal velocity and then use it in a game...
  9. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from GreaterThanOne in Ballistic Armor in modern or near future campaigns   
    Wait... maybe I'm being dense here.
     
    Why not just use various levels of Hardened, Armor Piercing, and Penetrating? Base "small arms" have no AP, stuff not available to typical civilians has one level of AP, scale up from there.
  10. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from drunkonduty in How do I balance NPCs?   
    Most stats aren't relevant - only worry about the stats most likely to come up.
     
    Low level opposition - don't track their Endurance or Recovery, since the fight will be over before that could become relevant.
     
    Also, don't feel the need to build every ability out - you have an infinite budget and know you CAN achieve any build... so you don't need to do the homework. However, be generous in working with players to confront these abilities, so you don't accidentally create an impossible to beat build.
  11. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Spence in How do I balance NPCs?   
    It is really difficult to answer your question as presented.  
    Especially not knowing genre or build points. 
    Superhero, Fantasy Hero and so on. 
     
    But regardless of that, Manic Typist hits the nail on the head.  Back in ancient times when I started running Champions, I spent uncounted hours building out everything.   And by everything, I mean everything.  NPC's, trees, building, walls and so on. 
     
    Now I have a cheat sheet of common material defense and body values for 'stuff'.  For creatures or NPC's I rarely build them out.  I just note key stats and roll with it.  If the NPC/Creature becomes a "named" threat or recurring one, I will perform a complete build.  Since my 'supers' worlds tend to have low populations of 'supers' I am more inclined to build out supervillains at the start.  But overall, short notes and stat blocks are what I use.
     
    In the end, regardless of game system, the GM has to be able to adjust on the fly for the players. 
    From my localized experience, new hero GM's can be blinded by the systems build system and trap themselves into thinking that they have to build everything.  And it doesn't help that a lot of herodom enjoys building stuff almost as much and they enjoy playing.
     
    In the end just build the minimum that you need to frame the adventure.  Let the players run and adapt to the story as it unfolds.   A group of purest Cthulhu horror players tend to expect their PC's to go insane and/or die.  A group of supers gamers tend to want to be able barely triumph after a grueling super-battle where they have had the opportunity to display their awesomeness. 
     
    Each genre has it's own version of "cool success" and it is the job of the GM to set the stage so the players can succeed. 
    But....
    That does not mean the GM is simply there to be walked on by the players.  Make sure to have fun too
     
  12. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from Spence in How do I balance NPCs?   
    Most stats aren't relevant - only worry about the stats most likely to come up.
     
    Low level opposition - don't track their Endurance or Recovery, since the fight will be over before that could become relevant.
     
    Also, don't feel the need to build every ability out - you have an infinite budget and know you CAN achieve any build... so you don't need to do the homework. However, be generous in working with players to confront these abilities, so you don't accidentally create an impossible to beat build.
  13. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from Hugh Neilson in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    ...actually, they kind of do. The player was told that their opponent was making an attack against them. If they don't declare Abort before the attack, then they don't get to do it afterward. You can't abort to a Dodge after you know the opponent hit you in the hopes that your DCV will make the difference.
     
    Remember, with Cover, the PC has already been hit. It's just damage hasn't been rolled yet.
     
    Also, as a general aside... I've only ever played Champions once. I was introduced, have GMed, and with one session exception only ever played NON-supers games. I view equating HERO with supers as erroneous - it's a legacy that's there, but Champions =/= HERO.
     
    Though I still do want to build a PC who can survive a fall at terminal velocity and then use it in a game...
  14. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from Vanguard in Ballistic Armor in modern or near future campaigns   
    No objection to any of what you said (what works is what works), but I just wanted to flag that this is substantively different from how Penetrating works. I understood it was meant as an analogy, but it's so different from how it actually works that I wanted to make sure you'd reviewed the rules on it recently so you're sure your target solution is what you think it is versus what a player reviewing the rules might think.
  15. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Duke Bushido in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    (yo, MT:
     
    i've managed to split the page break.  If you didn't see the example I promised, it's on the bottom of the previous page)
     
  16. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Duke Bushido in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    Okay--
     
    I'll take a simple stab-- sorry, but I just walked in for real about twenty minutes ago and cycled the kids through the eat-and-shower routine, I'm due to pick up the Leviathan and the wife left her lunch in the kitchen (she works nights), but I said I'd try (though technically, I'm really rushing things)
     
    First:
     
    Why would someone "use cover if it's such a waste?!"  [paraphrasing my own]
     
    I don't know.  Morality, perhaps?  A desire to _not_ have to shoot someone?
     
    Lack of choice?  "I'm supposed to bring in Bad Granny for questioning, but all I've got is my 4d6 RKA blast pistol...."
     
    And of course, the fact that it works on mooks without having to _actually_ splatter them.
     
     
    Anyway, this was supposed to be just a quick example, and I'm wasting time.

     
     
    First off: this works best for a super escaping a normal. And let's be honest, it makes sense that a super _should_ have a chance to escape a normal.  Also would like to note that I use the Cover rules from 4e, simply because at the time we adopted them more players owned 4e than anything else (it was the "new" book back then   ).  I will state up front that I don't know ( or -- and this is not rude; it's just to head off a rush of corrections that may be coming-- really care if it's different in later editions.  This works for us, and I'm not changing now).
     
    If you have HSRB 4e, you can find Cover on page 155.  Probably there in BBB, too. I know it's in there somewhere, just don't remember where.
     
    As folks have pointed out, I looked to Western HERO-- it is my single most well-worn sourcebook.  I use it the way the rest of you use Ninja HERO or the MA book for whatever generation you're playing at the moment.  Anyway, the idea was inspired by the showdown ideas.  Moreover, page 40, bottom right:
     


     
     
    Hilariously, there is no list below.  Not here, and not in that book.  Talk about a need for an errata.
     
    If you go to p155 of the HSRB 4e, you'll see this helpful phrase:
     


     
    Now it doesn't specify if it's referring to the Hit Location Chart, of if there are special penalties for where the two of you are standing.  Presumably the HLC, but who knows?
     
    At any rate, it mentions distractions, and the Western HERO book starts to give us some stuff to play with and utterly fails....   I can't help but think that at some point, there was meant to be an option or two-- at least one-- outside of PRE Attack.  Right or wrong; doesn't matter: you do you, after all.  If your players _enjoy_ being auto-hit by everyone who manages to sneak up on them, then go for it.  I'm not here to tell you they don't, after all.  If your players enjoy auto-hitting everyone they get the drop on, then the more the merrier.  Personally, I'm looking at the source material:  the super-fast sleight of hand that let's the ninja stare at a gun in his face (which I am going to argue suggest's he's pretty much _covered_) and in the blink of an eye he's holding the gun and his attacker is nursing a sprained wrist.  (yeah; that's Disarm, but given that the source material is chock-full-o-nuts _packed_ with this sort of exchange, I'm inclined to think that cover should _not_ be auto-hit.  And don't get me started on "covering" Speedsters.....
     
    Though as noted, I'm also inclined to think it should be a scary damned thing when you're both on roughly the same level.  Hence the DEX-off.
     
     
    At any rate, -- well, never mind.  Phone is ringing (looks like the phone at the wife's job, so let me hurry this up)
     
    Important thing to remember:  I don't generally just up and tell my players what SPD their opponents are, and between held actions, etc,  I don't make it easy to figure out (though I don't go out of my way to make it difficult, either)
     
    Other important thing:
     
    Remember what the SPD chart represents:  you don't do everything in a single second, then wait for your next single second out of twelve; you are assumed to be "doing the thing" at a rate that carries you from the start of your Phase until the start of you next one.
     
    Both of those are important.
     
    Why?
     
    Because it doesn't matter _what_ you do the Phase your opponent Covered you-- he is in the active process of getting a bead and deciding whether or not he's going to pull the trigger.  If you do something (that isn't "instant" or that has a Tell of some sort, Bang!  you have made up his mind for him; he has decided _not_ to wait, and you get hurt (maybe.  You definitely get hit).  Best thing for you to do (I've heard my older players teach this to new players  ) is take a Recovery or two and hope he doesn't have a SPD under 3.  The way I figured it when we started cobbling these rules, during that Phase, he is _intent_ on getting a bead on you and waffling as to whether it's worth it to go non-violent.
     
    The other important thing is how _well_ he has you covered.
     
     
    So you're ready to try something?
     
    Jimmy Crookneck has the drop on you!  He made his Cover roll by 4 (think of this as "how well he has you covered").  Remember this, because it's going to work against you if you try something.  
     
    Jimmy Crookneck is a local thug, working for the mob you're investigating.  Obviously, you're getting close to something the mob doesn't want you to get close to.  You carefully, obviously stop moving and let him see that you've stopped moving.  Take a minute; think this out.  Look around, see what might be of some help to you.  (Probably not the manila folder you're still holding after rifling through it.
     
    Jimmy is standing at your back.
     
     
    Break:
     
    Let's look at Jimmy's "covered" success:  this is a raw bonus he gets if you try something stupid.  If there's more than one of you, and he's trying to cover _all_ of you (or at least more than one), then this bonus is divided across the number of people he's trying to cover.  The bonus he gets for standing directly behind you, though-- that's just for you.  Let's say you've got a sidekick with you.  Jimmy's Covering bonus is divided by two as he wants to cover both of you.  Your sidekick is pretty much head-on to Jimmy, so no extra bonuses there: he can see Jimmy's every move, and you can't.  Oh, if only you had a telepath for a sidekick!  
     
    You spend a few moments doing _nothing_; letting Jimmy get comfortable with the idea that he's got you dead to rights and you're smart enough to know it.  You take that recovery while you're standing there, and maybe one more.   You've decided you're going to make a break for it!  You don't know if Jimmy's in striking range, and you can't draw a bead on him with Electro Bolts until you can actually aim at him (unless you want to try a hip shot.  Turns out you don't.)
     
    You are pretty sure you can drop and spring into a leap and get behind that heavy desk long enough to re-orient yourself and maybe get a shot off.  Dex off:
     
    Jimmy's a norm-- and athletic normal, sure, but he's only got a DEX of 15.  You, on the other hand, have the twitchy reflexes of living lightning, and your DEX 22 shows it.  You give a wink to your sidekick, and he knowingly activates his IPE Desolidification.  He can only keep it up for one minute, but he's safe for a moment...  you drop, hoping to screw up the bead he has on you, roll your shoulders forward, then spring into a leap to get behind the desk---   Fortunately, it's a new phase for Jimmy, or you'd feel hot lead somewhere just north of your foramen magnum!
     
    You make your DEX roll by 9; Jimmy makes his by 4.  Subtracting his from yours, you have a 5 pt bonus(the new editions call this a penalty skill level, but we didn't have that word when we came up with this.  At any rate, you can apply that toward the original "Covering" roll.  As Jimmy made his original roll by 4, and your bonus (his PSL) subtracts from that, wo-hoo!  You _almost_ got away with it.  He has now made his cover roll by exactly zero, but hey-- he made it.  Bang!  You've been shot!  
     
    Better for Jimmy, not only have you been shot, but he's still got that bonus +2 (his covering bonus of 4, divided across the two characters) he can add to his roll to cover you again, if he should so desire.  Or, since he's tracking you so well, he can use it to flat out shoot you.  You're not very cooperative, after all.
     
    Fortunately, Ghost Boy used this distraction to phase through the wall behind him, and is safe.
     
     
    Now let's say you had made your Dex roll by 10!  Then subtract Jimmy's Dex success of 4, and you can assign a PSL of _5_ to the covering roll.  As it made it only by 4, you manage to pull it off!  You manage to to get out of harm's way (for a moment!).  However, Jimmy still has his Covering bonus of 2 (since he voluntarily split it) he can apply to re-Cover you, or just open fire.
     
    Note:   Characters covering a group can _voluntarily_ relinquish some of the targets to "get back" some of the bonus, _provided_ they do so before they lose Covered status.
     
    For example, in the above, Jimmy could have decided that Ghost Boy was not a real threat, and decided to focus his attention entirely on you, granting him the full +4 in the event you tried something and succeeded.  However, once he loses track of any of the covered people (say one teleports away or something), that option is no longer available: he has divided his attention too far, or something like that, and only has whatever his bonus was after the initial division.  Similarly, he can voluntarily split the bonus further to cover additional people who come into the area, should he want to.
     
     
    I have _really_ got to get my wife her lunch, so I'm going to go.  I trust you can see how this is still a deadly option for "heroic" normal-v-normal type stuff, and nearly as dangerous for super-v-super.  That's pretty much what we wanted: a chance for super characters (not just super heroes, but the Ninjas and fast aliens and what-have-you in Heroic stuff) to actually _be_ action heroes, and for that "little bit better than normal" to be the deciding factor (dice willing, of course )
     
    I'm sorry if this doesn't answer your questions, but if you want to know more, just ask.  I'll try to get them answered tomorrow.
     
    There is no point in saying "feel free to point out all the flaws and problems and anti-HERO System things in these house rules (crap!  I need to track down Chris Goodwin's House Rules thread and put a cleaner version there at some point in the future), so long as you understand that I'm not changing the way I do this at my table.  It's worked since '92.  I have absolutely _no doubt_ it will work until I'm dead or too damned old to draw players.
  17. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Duke Bushido in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    Almost forgot:  
     
    Dex-off:
     
    Compare "level of success" for each character.  If the Diving character has the higher level of success, then subtract the covering character's success level, and the covering character takes that number as a negative modifier against his previous "to-hit" roll.  (it is in this way that the diving character may still get hit).  All characters hit while diving are assumed to have fallen prone.
     
    Here's where it gets a bit wiggy, but my players feel it to be fair:
     
    If the covering character has the higher level of success, subtract the diving character's success level from the covering character's success level.  In addition to hitting the diving character, he may apply this difference as a positive modifier to hit the character on the covering character's next Phase.  The idea is that he _is_ covering the character, and though he didn't react _quite_ fast enough to "pull the trigger," as it were, he managed to keep the character "covered" and tracked him as he moved.
     
    This bonus must be used immediately, or it is lost.
     
    As I said, it's a bit wiggy, but my players all seem cool with it, as it gives them a _chance_, and a pretty good one versus "normals," but not a really great one versus someone on their own level.
     
     
  18. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to massey in Cover (maneuver): How to Use   
    I don't think anyone in our group has ever used the cover maneuver even once.  I do like it though, at least thematically.  My own house-rule, if anyone ever bothered to use it, would be that covering someone would negate their Combat Luck.  When the bad guy holds James Bond at gunpoint, Bond doesn't just run around shooting like he did before.  Suddenly he's in actual danger.
  19. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from Duke Bushido in Ballistic Armor in modern or near future campaigns   
    No objection to any of what you said (what works is what works), but I just wanted to flag that this is substantively different from how Penetrating works. I understood it was meant as an analogy, but it's so different from how it actually works that I wanted to make sure you'd reviewed the rules on it recently so you're sure your target solution is what you think it is versus what a player reviewing the rules might think.
  20. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Lord Liaden in The Turakian Age is Seriously Underrated   
    When I adapted TA to my own use, I expanded the role of various non-humans, giving them a more prominent "footprint" in the setting. For example, I made more explicit the economic and political ties between the score of named Dwarven kingdoms and their human neighbors, as well as their role as trade middlemen between the surface world and the Underdark. I also tried to individualize each kingdom as done with the human nations in TA. I inserted more Elven forest realms into several areas where there was space on the map without much else happening in their vicinity. I also gave more independence to various Gnome and Halfling communities. I added communities of Drakine driven from their original homes by the wars with Men who had adapted to new living arrangements, e.g. "barbaric" clans living within the Ulimar Jungle; and boat-dwelling Drakine "gypsies" roving the coasts of Lake Beralka and the Sea of Mhorec. I also established a couple of underwater kingdoms of Merfolk in places I thought they would logically fit, and expanded the presence of aquatic races like the Uthosa in Mhorec and Beralka.
  21. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to IndianaJoe3 in Wealth without money   
    I've noodled around with the idea of a Resource roll. It starts at 11- (or 8- if the character is poor), with a +1 to the roll for 5 points. Normal expenses (food, rent, equipment maintenance) don't require a roll, but major expenses (new weapons, armor, magic items) would. Expensive items would have a penalty to the roll. Treasure would be abstracted as 1-time bonuses to the roll.
  22. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from Maccabe in Getting Better: Tonight's Mistakes   
    So I had another one of those nights where I knew I should know the rules but in the moment I was uncertain (I also had one of those "stop watching me do basic math" when determining how much damage was done after defenses, love it).
     
    So I thought I'd share what things I drew a blank on, and then go review the rules and share the results, in the hopes that it'll save others time/encourage others to share their own lessons from things they forgot/generate interesting discussion.
     
    1) Passing Strike - the player works straight out of HeroDesigner, and I forgot to print his sheet for my reference, so he ended up asking me "So is it +30 STR or 30 STR total for this move?" and since I couldn't see his screen... I made a call but honestly couldn't be sure. I don't really love this habit of his but if I'd had a hard copy I could have answered it. That was really my biggest pain point all night and it was entirely self-inflicted.
     
    2) Using Desolid/Flight combo power in conjunction with Disarm/Passing Disarm - Same PC, has a Desolid movement power like Reaper in Overwatch. In the case of Disarm, you can definitely do a half move/then Disarm. With Passing Disarm... the PC wanted to activate the Power, then fly across the room, rematerialize and use Disarm (need to make sure the PC actually has Passing Disarm... point is, since they don't have the "Affects Solid" (forget the proper name off the top of my head) Advantage, they would need to deactivate the Power to perform the Passing Disarm. I ruled it was allowable but am going to research the combination of Activating/Deactivating a power and then performing a maneuver at the end.
     
    3) Need to review the Sweep/Multiple Attack w/Manuevers rules. I know it's you take the worst of all modifers and apply it to all, with a -2 to all attacks after the first... but want to double check.
     
    4) Another player thought AVAD couldn't do BODY as a default, like NND requires the "Does Body" Adv. I honestly couldn't recall.
     
    5) Can you draw a weapon as a part of movement? I think I thought this but it's because I was recently reviewing the rules for Pathfinder.
     
    6) Shapeshift - I've never used it as a PC, so I need to re-read it again. Mostly I'm want to be ready for when the PC, who has multiple identities via Shapeshift, gets knocked unconscious. Do they revert to their true form? Is there a heal back associated with it like Transform?
     
    Now to pull out my books and see what I can look up.
  23. Like
    Manic Typist got a reaction from bigbywolfe in Tactics (Not Builds)   
    If "Bravo, flank left and prepare enfilade. Alpha, advance to cover and engage. Charlie, set up overwatch on that ridge. Move!" qualifies to you as tactics... then Liaden's awesome list is full of equivalent tactics/tactical maneuvers/tools.
     
    Just rename LoneWolf's example to the codephrase "Doubletap!" and it would fit right onto the list. Same for Doc's example.
     
    The examples you cited... are basic maneuvers/abilities. They are of course brought up because they are a major part of play, and thus are relevant to discussing the "improvement" of play.
  24. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Thumper in Rhûne: Magic Systems   
    Here is an example of one the schools of magic and a few spells.
     
    ASTROLOGICAL MAGIC

     
    Astrological Magic is a form of White Magic that requires significant training and education to master.  Practitioners of Astrological Magic are called Astromancers.  Astromancers call upon the power of the stars themselves to create magical effects.  When casting, the Astromancer must call out complex strings of astrological correspondences, binding the powers of the Moons, Planets and Zodiac and causing them to converge on, while tracing their corresponding signs in the air with their fingers.  Astromancy is famous for its powerful divinatory abilities, and many people are unaware that these stargazers can call upon cosmic energies to vanquish the most powerful of foes.  The signature ability of Astromancers is Astrology.
     
    Astrology 
    By spending an hour studying the relative position of Rhûne's moons and stars, the Astromancer can perform any one of the following divinations:
    Fate: The condition or general whereabouts of any once individual may be divined. The Astromancer may divine if the individual in question is "safe," "in great danger," "nearby," "faraway," etc. If desired, the general direction in which an individual may be found can also be discerned. Wisdom: The wisdom or advisibility of a single course of action may be determined in advance; i.e. "is it safe to cross the swamp by day," "is it wise to offer a bribe to the city magistrate," etc. Only "yes" or "no" answers may be determined through this type of divination. Destiny: The caster may determine whether a given event or circumstance will occur in the near future; i.e. "will the wizard be in his tower tomorrow night," "will we encounter goblins as we pass through the forest," etc. Only "yes" or "no" answers may be determined through this type of divination. Use of this ability requires a clear night sky, telescope and astrolabe and one hour.  Astrology is a form of magic but is not a spell, rather it is is a magical talent.  Spellcasters who choose Astrological Magic as their free School gain the Astrology talent for free, but must still purchase the Astrology skill.  Otherwise, Astrology costs 5 points.
     
    Astrology: Precognitive Clairsentience (Sight Group) (40 Active Points); Extra Time (1 Hour, Only to Activate, Character May Take No Other Actions, -1 3/4), OAF Bulky Fragile (Telescope and Astrolabe; -1 3/4), Precognition Only (-1), Concentration, Must Concentrate throughout use of Constant Power (1/2 DCV; -1/2), Conditional Power: Stars Must Be Visible (-1/4), Limited Power: Fate, Wisdom, Destiny Only (-1/2), Requires A Roll (Skill roll; -1/2); Real Cost: 5
     
    SPELLS
    All of the following spells have the standard spell limitations (Requires A Roll (Skill roll, -1/2), Concentration (1/2 DCV; -1/4), Extra Time (Delayed Phase, -1/4), Gestures (-1/4), Incantations (-1/4), Real Spell (-1/4), Side Effects (-1/4)) in addition to any listed Limitations.  Constant powers and Skills bought as spells also have Cost Endurance (Only to Activate, -1/4) limitation and Time Limit (varies) advantage.
     
    Astral Bolt
    This spell allows the Astromancer to hurl a shimmering bolt of silver light crafted from pure cosmic energy from his hand.  This astral energy affects all forms of intangible and ethereal creatures, whether they be ethereal, air elementals, spirits, etc. 
    Apprentice: Blast 2d6, Affects Desolid (Any); Beam (-1/4); Skill -1, END 1, Range 150m Journeyman: Blast 4d6, Affects Desolid (Any); Beam (-1/4); Skill -3, END 3, Range 300m Master: Blast 6d6, Affects Desolid (Any); Beam (-1/4); Skill -4, END 4, Range 450m Grandmaster: Blast 8d6, Affects Desolid (Any); Beam (-1/4); Skill -6, END 6, Range 600m Archmage: Blast 10d6, Affects Desolid (Any); Beam (-1/4); Skill -7, END 7, Range 750m  
    Fortune
    This spells allows the Astromancer to protect her allies from magical attacks for 24 hours.  While under the influence of this spell,  the target gains a bonus to their DCV against any Real Spell that requires a To Hit roll.
    Apprentice: +1 DCV, Usable By Other (+1/4), Time Limit (1 Day; +1 3/4); Only Against Real Spells (-1 1/2); Skill -1, END 1, Range Touch Journeyman: +2 DCV, Usable By Other (+1/4), Time Limit (1 Day; +1 3/4); Only Against Real Spells (-1 1/2); Skill -3, END 3, Range Touch Master: +3 DCV, Usable By Other (+1/4), Time Limit (1 Day; +1 3/4); Only Against Real Spells (-1 1/2); Skill -4, END 4, Range Touch Grand Master: +4 DCV, Usable By Other (+1/4), Time Limit (1 Day; +1 3/4); Only Against Real Spells (-1 1/2); Skill -6, END 6, Range Touch Archmage: +5 DCV, Usable By Other (+1/4), Time Limit (1 Day; +1 3/4); Only Against Real Spells (-1 1/2); Skill -7, END 7, Range Touch *The Only Against Real Spells (-1 1/2) limitation may seem excessive, and for some campaigns it may be,  however I rarely use villainous spellcasters as enemies.  In my last campaign, less than 3% of enemies used Real Spells in combat.
    Lesser Incantation of Mars
    The Astromancer calls upon the martial power of the planet Mars to grant himself proficiency with melee weapons and skill in combat for a few minutes.
    Apprentice: +1 with HTH Combat plus WF: Common Melee Weapons, Time Limit (1 Minute; +1/2); Skill -2, END 2, Range Self Journeyman: +2 with HTH Combat plus WF: Common Melee Weapons, Time Limit (2 Minutes; +1/2); Skill -3, END 3, Range Self Master: +3 with HTH Combat plus WF: Common Melee Weapons, Time Limit (3 Minutes; +1/2); Skill -5, END 5, Range Self Grand Master: +4 with HTH Combat plus WF: Common Melee Weapons, Time Limit (4 Minutes; +1/2); Skill -6, END 6, Range Self Archmage: +5 with HTH Combat plus WF: Common Melee Weapons, Time Limit (5 Minutes; +3/4); Skill -8, END 8, Range Self Lesser Incantation of Sagittarius
    The Astromancer calls upon the unerring aim of the Zodiac Sagittarius to grant herself proficiency with missile weapons and skill in combat for a few minutes.
    Apprentice: +1 with Ranged Combat plus WF: Common Missile Weapons, Time Limit (1 Minute; +1/2); Skill -2, END 2, Range Self Journeyman: +2 with Ranged Combat plus WF: Common Missile Weapons, Time Limit (2 Minutes; +1/2); Skill -3, END 3, Range Self Master: +3 with Ranged Combat plus WF: Common Missile Weapons, Time Limit (3 Minutes; +1/2); Skill -5, END 5, Range Self Grand Master: +4 with Ranged Combat plus WF: Common Missile Weapons, Time Limit (4 Minutes; +1/2); Skill -6, END 6, Range Self Archmage: +5 with Ranged Combat plus WF: Common Missile Weapons, Time Limit (5 Minutes; +3/4); Skill -8, END 8, Range Self  
    Air Sign
    Mastery of the Air Sign allows the Astromancer to call upon the powers of Zephyrion, the Air Moon, to summon and control winds, bending them to a number of purposes:
    Wild Wind creates a swirling ball of winds that the caster can hurl at targets, where it explodes in a powerful burst of intensely strong winds that will hurl every human-sized targets in a random direction.  Depending on the terrain, this can deal devastating damage as targets are thrown into walls or each other. Wind Wings creates miniature tornado around the caster, lifting them off the ground and propelling them through the air. Dispel Barriers counters and dispels magical barriers of earth and stone. The Astromancer may only activate one of these 3 powers with each casting of the spell.
     
    Apprentice (Multipower, 15-point reserve); Skill -1, END 1, Range 150m or Self
    Wild Wind :  Blast 1d6, Area Of Effect (4m Radius; +1/4), Knockback x8 (+1 1/2); Does No Damage (-1) Wind Wings:  Flight 6m, Time Limit (20 Minutes; +1) Dispel Barriers:  Dispel Magical Earth/Stone Walls 5d6 Journeyman (Multipower, 30-point reserve); Skill -3, END 3, Range 300m or Self
    Wild Wind :  Blast 2d6, Area Of Effect (6m Radius; +1/4), Knockback x8 (+1 1/2); Does No Damage (-1) Wind Wings:  Flight 12m, Time Limit (20 Minutes; +1) Dispel Barriers:  Dispel Magical Earth/Stone Walls 10d6 Master (Multipower, 45-point reserve); Skill -4, END 4, Range 450m or Self
    Wild Wind :  Blast 3d6, Area Of Effect (8m Radius; +1/2), Knockback x8 (+1 1/2); Does No Damage (-1) Wind Wings:  Flight 20m, Time Limit (20 Minutes; +1) Dispel Barriers:  Dispel Magical Earth/Stone Walls 15d6 Grand Master (Multipower, 60-point reserve); Skill -6, END 6, Range 600m or Self
    Wild Wind :  Blast 3 1/2d6, Area Of Effect (16m Radius; +3/4), Knockback x8 (+1 1/2); Does No Damage (-1) Wind Wings:  Flight 20m, Time Limit (1 Hour; +1 1/4) Dispel Barriers:  Dispel Magical Earth/Stone Walls 20d6 Archmage (Multipower, 75-point reserve); Skill -7, END 7, Range 750m or Self
    Wild Wind :  Blast 4d6, Area Of Effect (24m Radius; +1), Knockback x8 (+1 1/2); Does No Damage (-1) Wind Wings:  Flight 20m,  x8 Noncombat, Time Limit (1 Hour; +1 1/4) Dispel Barriers:  Dispel Magical Earth/Stone Walls 25d6
  25. Like
    Manic Typist reacted to Christopher R Taylor in Tactics (Not Builds)   
    Yeah Gnome, I think you should spend a bit more time explaining exactly what it is you want to see here, nobody but you seems to understand it.
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