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dialNforNinja

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  1. If there isn't one, perhaps some of our old hands could make one? It does sound like a very useful thing to have.
  2. The Growth and Shrinking powers are more granular, dealing with a linear increase in height rather than doubling, with less things rolled in automatically if I remember the explanation someone gave in another thread recently, and accompanying lower cost for intermediate heights. I'd prefer to calculate mass as the cube of the linear dimensions rather than the listed... doubling I think? But that's not a (puts on sunglasses) big deal comparatively.
  3. It would work for spells currently boosting stats, but you don't have to connect them to one to store or to use them. It's a very flavorful and unique system, but a pain in the butt to try to convert to anything else. Charges or a separate END reserve for each spell is really the only way I can see to accurately manage that, which would probably mean an entire page or two just for that in practice, but I knew going it it would be impractical. I [i]have[/i] played the game, even if it's been about a decade since my PSX got stolen, and managing it is bad enough when the computer automagically tracks the numbers. I still think buying the characteristics to the maximum boost and then limiting them by how many Charges/how much END/whatever is plugged in to power those extra stats is probably the way to go there, with the value of that limitation depending heavily on campaign circumstances, as how many and how high quality a supply of spells the character will typically have available for the purpose will directly determine how much of that maximum is available overall. For how much effect one of a particular spell has on a currently linked stat, probably some ratio of the AP value for one use of the spell versus the AP value for one point in the stat? That kind of evaluation is the main benefit of the Hero system, after all. Checking the wiki and a FAQ I find that in FF8 itself the MC ranges from ~6 in all stats at Lv7 to ~45 at lv100, while the strongest spell adds between .25 and 1 point per each (stacking to 100 copies of the spell) depending on which stat, with STR at 1/ea giving somewhere between a fifteen-fold to double-and-a-bit increase in FF8's linear stats. With Hero doubling on fives and tens and base stats at 10, 30 STR would be four doublings or a sixteen fold increase, and also 30cp. 30cp worth of increase (from the base value, not the character's actual stats as bought, so most of the stats would cap at 30, DEX at 20, SPD at 5, etc.) per stat sounds not-horrible as a first approximation with the caveat that you're not ever going to be able to have all of that on everything, or even most things, not much of any of them at the beginning, and certainly not without a lot of collecting and refining. (Which would be its own problem with practical implementation, as grinding for consumable resources is dull enough in a video game but utter poison on the tabletop.) That's still going to be pretty spendy, no matter how much you judge the Limitation of needing to plug uncast spells into it to actually get any of those stats as being worth. (Also, I must have been unclear - the spells gained from an environmental point stay until you cast them, the same as any others, it's just that the draw point only holds a few - three to maybe in theory fifteen? I vaguely remember seeing that listed as the upper bound, though I don't think I ever got more than half that from any draw point in the game - and takes a while before you can get more of what it provides.)
  4. @Sveta8, it's not generic magic energy, you get one specific spell from a draw point, and I think only one specific spell from an enemy type at a certain level range - like, right outside the starting base there's a draw point for Heal spells. You can get a few of them off of it and then it's depleted until you've walked a certain number of steps, for example. It's not a general "magic energy" that you can then use for any spell - that wouldn't be unusual at all, since the normal system in FF games is that your HP/SP recovers at a save point and it translates pretty directly to the Hero standard "cast from END" or an END reserve.
  5. Possibly the least popular entry in the long running series (though opinions, as ever, vary) in no small part due to the very different approach it took to magic and improving your character, it's nonetheless one of the games I find the most interesting for precisely those reasons. To briefly explain it, spells in FF8 are collected from points in the environment that naturally collect magic energy, from enemies during battle through the "Draw" action (they can also be cast as the same action rather than kept,) or by refining unneeded equipment, and stockpiled for each character. That much isn't anything too difficult, it basically just amounts to having them as Charges, and with the ability to stack up 100 of each spell, the only way that's even worth anything as a Limitation is that you can only initially gain or after using them recover Charges by finding an appropriate source or buying the items/spending the time to refine them. Casting only uses the stockpiled spell, as the game doesn't even have a traditional magic points system. Where it gets crazy is the Junction system - leaving out the whole side issue of summons (Called Guardian Forces in this game, but pretty much the FF standard Espers in lore and practical implementation) and how they enable the mechanic in-character - your stockpiled Charges of a particular spell can be attached to a stat to boost its value, with some spells more effective on some stats. Cast some of the linked spells, and the benefit goes down proportionately, so it's best to keep your most commonly useful spells not linked to a stat, or not one you need for your core abilities at least. Yes, this is absolutely game-breaking when fully utilized or only on one side, and its effect on game balance is the root of most complaints against it. Trying to get it approved for use in a game, or even to run a game with such a mechanic in use whether as a one-off or commonly, is probably folly even without considering the bookkeeping requirements for a pen and paper game rather than a CRPG. Even so, Hero can supposedly build anything, and this aspect is what's niggling at me this morning, specifically how to represent it. along with a variable stock of up to a couple dozen spells to begin with. My first thought is a Framework (I keep waffling on which, as a Multipower would need all the spells [32 in FF8 itself] premade and paid for even with no Charges for them, while a VPP can only use the ones currently active [and depending on interpretation might not even keep the Charges for ones not currently active] while a dedicated collector might have large stocks of every spell after a while) with variably Linked additions to Stats with the effect proportionate to the number of Charges and which spell they're linked to. This seems to be both a bit clunky and only loosely approaching the desired effect, but so far I don't have a better idea. What do you folks think? There is also the question of how to handle the Draw mechanic to gain Charges, from monsters and equipment at least, since access to environmental Draw points is pretty much entirely in the realm of RP and plot. Equipment used for the purpose is gone but it doesn't seem to bother an enemy at all or diminish their own abilities, and the spells that can be gotten are generally only loosely connected to their habitat or themes. Aside from just assigning them by fiat, I don't see any real system to apply to them, but how do you model the Draw ability to begin with? Is just giving the spells the Limitation that Charges must be Drawn in combat by using an Action on a Power check enough to cover it? And then the whole issue of getting them by consuming bought equipment... Doing that as the SFX of a Limitation rather than a power to generate Charges in its own right still just feels weird, though I suppose it makes sense within the system. Some method of creating Charges, at least with one or more for the desired spell already stocked, using Endurance might work better overall than directly translating the equipment-Refining aspect, and could still tie into Triple Triad cards made from transforming weakened monsters without the intermediate step of using them to make equipment for the purpose. (That's a whole other thing, but adequately represented with the Transform power so it's probably not worth more than the note.) Some relevant FF Wiki links: the Junction system the Draw command the Refine command the Card command
  6. Has butt storage really spread so insidiously? Does no one keep local files anymore, that they can't even save two images? Woe, woe, the end of days has befallen unheralded! All is lost, all is lost...
  7. Oh, I certainly don't dispute any of that, but it is useful to have a baseline to look at, and I at least find a line on a graph easier to work with than a series of inputs on a spread sheet or web site - and while not as much of a concern nowadays I suppose, I still tend to operate on the assumption that internet access may not be available everywhere I want to be. (There are still a few cell phone dead spots in the back of beyond and the twistier valleys, if nothing else.) That is a handy site for when it is, though.
  8. Isn't it more limiting to have the Linked power only work on a successful hit, than every time the other power is used to attack, though? Between the concept being "recovers when the enemy is damaged" and the basic principle that you can always add more limitations for free if they're not worth at least -1/4, that sounds like the Limitation version should be fine. I mean, it's making the healing power less effective than just having it available at will whether or not there's a handy target you don't mind hurting, so it should cost less, no? Doing it the way you said, you could heal by firing into the sky - or at least, that's what it looks like from how you said it.
  9. Thanks for the explanation, Duke! I can see where you're coming from with that... I think my preference would be to calculate height from the doubled mass or mass from the linear increase in height rather than specifying them separately, but I can see how that would not appeal without a calculator at hand if you're dealing with intermediate values at all. The car was probably Prowl, who is actually a Datsun 280ZX, but that just means he looks like a Porsche who decided he had too much junk in the trunk and went on a diet. He was pretty much Prime's second in command as much as any kind of command structure was ever shown. At least, the only other s1/s2 characters I can think of who had light bars look nothing like a Porsche, the closest being Red Alert who is very much a Lamborghini Countach with all the angularity that entails. An actual Porsche with numbers but no light bar would probably be Jazz, resident Cool Cat, voiced by Scatman Crothers in the cartoon, and probably the worst done by as supposedly included in the first Bayformers movie. That had his alt mode looking more like Bluestreak (who despite his name is silver and black, with red bits on his robot mode,) talking all tryhard "gangsta" as a bigger hothead than most of the characters who've been named Hothead, and killed like a chump to demonstrate "Megatron's" bad ass cred. RUINED FOREVER! The purple space-gun was certainly Shockwave, one of the big name Decepticons, left in charge of Cybertron while Megatron and his elites chased the escaping Autobots. His name was reused for the building-eating snake things in I htink the third Bayformers movie, but by that point I had entirely dismissed them as connecting to any other Transformers property on even the thematic level and didn't pay much attention. As for the motivations of the war, once upon a time it was just Evil Decepticons Want to Rule Everything vs. Good Autobots Want To Protect Freedom, to the point that Megatron's signature quote was "Peace though tyranny," and Optimus's was "Freedom is the right of all sentient beings," then they added Decepticons having been built as military products and Autobots as civilian merchandise but having rebelled together against the Quintessons and only later split into opposing factions, then in more recent comics they turned it into Megatron raising a rebellion against an oppressive Autobot government and then going off the extremist deep end, retconned that two or three more times, and now I have no idea. There were something like thirty more or less related Transformers continuities when I counted them up in the mid-noughties, and that number has only kept growing.
  10. The traditional answer in TF fandom for where all the robot bits go to make room for passengers and a normal looking (or not, it varies from one episode to another) engine etc. is "subspace," along with how Soundwave and Megatron go from thirty feet or so as robots to handheld, and how characters can just suddenly be holding their guns. In at least one G1 episode, the character's gun is actually shown appearing with a purple flash rahter than between cuts or pulled from behind them. Merlin being an actual wizard present in Camelot and... I think Mirage? having been one of the Knights of the Round Table is also canon. A different season two episode featured fish-men from Atlantis attacking the surface world, and a now-solo Cobra Commander is in one of the s3 (post-1986-movie) episodes using Synthezoid technology as the villain of the week. That's just in US G1 TV, mind you - the comics featured Spider-Man, several Mutants, lots of other GI Joe material, Dr. Who, at least one Star Trek crossover... basically, they were not even trying to hide the "giant metal superheroes" angle. Bayformers are actually the odd ones out in that for the most part, robot and alt mode mass isn't played with that way. The shows (or rather, new shows) are still on the air, though, it's not just a "back in the day" thing, and the robo-nudist Bay aesthetic has been thankfully almost completely abandoned in favor of modern takes on the classic, mostly smooth blocky builds. The most recent toy lines (Combiner Wars, featuring lots of gestalts, Titans Return, where everyone become a Headmaster, Power of the Primes that was basically both plus a new spin on Powermasters, Siege that focused on base modes, and now Earthrise with different base modes and basically identical to G1 stylling) are explicitly designed to look as close as possible to G1 animation models, in fact, while generally having ball joint hips, shoulders, necks, and 90 degree elbow and knee bends with bicep and thigh swivels, as a minimum. TR even gave us a Perceptor who turns into a microscope again, when Hasbro had previously held that such a sciencey toy was too nerdy to sell to modern children! And fembots! We've had no less than four main line Arcee toys and two con-exclusive recolors in those lines, along with three all-female combiner teams, Chromia and Nautica and whats-her-name the Paradron medic who's really just Arcee in mint green, but still a female character getting an actual toy so I don't care! And RID2015 Strongarm, and Windblade, and a couple of Decepticons I can't remember the names of! Still no Minerva aside from a convention event exclusive, sadly, but TR Breakaway with repainted Nightbeat for a head is decently close. However, Headmasters, the closely related Brainmasters (where the mini partner only forms the face and pops into the shell of the head) Targetmasters (where the partner turns into a gun) and Powermasters (where they form an engine) are generally the only Transformers who feature habitable compartments in robot mode, with even transports like Astrotrain or Skylinx, or Titans like Metroplex, Trypticon, and Fortress Maximus, having any other characters thery carry debark before transforming. ... I'm kind of into Transformers, if you didn't get that. Just a little. I've only spent a few hundred dollars on them this year! I needed to eat less anyway, and lifting boxes of toys is good exercise!
  11. What's this? I'm not starting a thread to ask a silly/obvious question this time? Inconceivable! So, what we have here are a couple of charts plotting character height and mass, from a Hero System General thread that ran on /tg/ a week or two ago. Actual science (and the Hero default) has mass change by the cube of linear height while maintaining normal proportions, but the square and, for Shrinking, linear values are also included as the way large or small characters act in comic books often coincides more with their visible space on the page, and because even that still feels like it goes down a bit fast for Shrinking. Keeping in mind that 2m and 100kg is a comic-book-heroic adult male, it's also useful to eyeball the Shrinking curve for when you want a roughly appropriate base mass for characters who are not quite so built, such as the ever popular "smol-grr" action girl or teenage characters in general. Consider this as an upper bound for the common range of mass for a given height with a lower bound at 80-85% of what's shown, drop another 10-15% for women, and you won't go too far wrong. This also gives a baseline to look at for deciding how much your hulking brute built like a four-foot-tall nuclear bunker let alone a mere brick wall, or Mr. Stilty the Living Skeleton, will mass as a variation from the standard. Yes, it is just basic math, but a visual depiction of that can help a lot for folks who are less inclined to having Lightning Calculator IRL. Edit: No embedding images? Sigh, whatever. Links then: Growth chart Shrinking chart
  12. Nah, but CC and the BBB are the only corebooks I have. (Though yes, I did also get the two APGs, Martial Arts, Skills, and 5eTUV along with Champions Powers...) I can't check FREd or the 6e pair to quote from, so I specified my sources since there may be a difference. And of course, "the GM says you can" (or can't) overrides anything the books may say, but they are intended to be the general go-to answer for a baseline. Certainly! I hold very strongly to the idea that while the party may be in conflict with the antagonists, and PCs may even have arguments between each other, the object is for the GM and all the players to have fun telling a collaborative story of epic awesomeness, in the classical sense as well as the modern "Dude, that was epic!" - to the point that I didn't mesh with one group at all, because they were deeply into the whole Players vs GM thing and I can't see that as anything but draining for both sides. edit: Oh, right, I forgot to ask - what's the difference between Growth for 6e and previous versions? It's still doubling your size each level as discussed, or halving it for Shrinking. I saw some height/weight charts for that not long ago actually, let me dig them up...
  13. Well yeah, that's what we've been talking about. I guess there's no reason you couldn't prepare a Vehicle sheet for the character's alt mode if that's what you mean, though it doesn't seem like there'd really be any advantage to doing so when you'd still need the normal character sheet at the table anyway. Maybe for the GM who has an NPC transformer secretly acting as the party Supermobile and letting a PC drive to keep their cover, i guess? I suppose you could also treat it like a Summoned Vehicle, but that seems to be adding even more complexity for again no real gain.
  14. No, actually, or at least not in Champions Complete. It specifically says that you cannot have a Vehicle (or Base, Computer, etc.) as an alternate form, only a Character compliant with the normal rules and campaign point caps/RoX (though the latter is worded in such a very confusing way that I had to have someone here explain.) I don't have the 6e corebooks or FREd, but checking the BBB the wording is not so direct in 4th edition, it just says "the new form should be built with the same guidelines as the base character," which I take to mean "built as a character rather than a vehicle" as well. Hunting around the internet for a couple hours I only found one person's collection of Transformers character stats (it's here if you're curious, also featuring many DC, Marvel, & indie comics characters) all 4th Ed and using a Shapeshift with linked Movement powers rather than Multiform, and a couple of "hot to Transformers in 5th Ed" threads tha tpretty much advised the same thing, sicne the character's stats, skills, psych lims, etc. don't change, and the physical folding and twisting is not relevant to game mechanics when they're really just changing movement style and sometimes the availability of their weapons. As an aside, one of the bear-themed semi-OC characters on that linked page is named Ursanal, and another, a platypus with chainsaw bill and tail, is Monoscream. If just those don't make you hit the link, I don't know what else possibly could.
  15. As for the "turns into a car" bit, that's Growth and some extra Running with OIAID (edit: and a Shapechange for the "normal car" disguise factor) since it's only a change in degree of how the character can act, not even the basic function of what they can do. Adding a few features to specify that passengers and cargo are carried securely in car form rather than hanging off the back like a baby koala, and what is a fair way to represent those for Turbo Teen compared to Teen Wolf who's just as strong, fast, and tough in his Alternate ID but does not have genuine textured Naugahyde, Super Sport trim level bucket seats to ride in and a moon-roof to keep the rain off is the point of the question. (Presumably, Teen Wolf spent those points on some Enhanced Senses and Claws.)
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