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Prefers2Lurk

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  1. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    The trick with the minigun on the motorcycle is to squeeze off about 1/3 second of brrrrp at targets.  It should be more than enough to force control rolls in your targets while the motorcycle dextrously maneuvers around larger vehicles sidelined by its fire to their tires, through windshields, etc.
     
    i.e. No long brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrp, but something more like well-aimed, short burst brrrp brrrp brrrp's at one or more targets.  Quick bursts to put just enough firepower where it needs to go ... and no more.
     
    You can do a lot with a little ammo ... like that.
  2. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    And the A10 Warthog can only carry about 10 seconds worth of ammo for its cannon -- but it's still effective for its given role.
  3. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    I believe it's actual modern life where weapon selection while at headquarters, base camp, or at home before a reasonably brief mission is pretty normal -- regardless of whether that mission is a military operation outside of the Green Zone, a SWAT engagement to deal with an active shooter, or a day/weekend's hunt in the wild.  i.e. It's unlikely someone is encumbered by multiple rifles ... just as it's unlikely someone's humping multiple ammunition types meant to be fired through multiple barrels for a single rifle with multi-caliber barrel options for its platform.  (Most likely additional rifles, ammo, and barrels are handled from a logistical supply angle ... i.e. moved by truck or other non-human locomotion ... and swapped/restocked/changed between missions.  Exceptions for edge cases, of course, apply, but I believe this is the norm/rule in most scenarios.)
     
    i.e. A 1984 'Red Dawn' scenario would be an outlier/exception ... not the norm, today.  (And even those kids had a sporting good shop as a supply depot, trucks, and a base camp from which they operated...allowing for weapon changes and resupply.)
  4. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Sure it is -- put it down and pick up another gun of a different caliber!  Think about it: with the RFB coming in ~US$1000 less than the MSRP price of the Desert Tech ... you can actually buy another gun of a different caliber ... and have two different firearms.
     
    Also, a reminder -- you dial your rifle's scope in at one caliber ... then change calibers ... and have to dial it in for the second caliber.  This is a solid use case for simply having two different rifles ... of two different calibers ... each of which is dialed in -- and just grabbing and going.  (This, by the way, is my personal preference and approach, as well.)
  5. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    At a MSRP of US$2,200 per unit for the 7.62 NATO version of the Desert Tech MDR, they are a VERY spendy option compared to the Kel-Tec RFB (which is quite a machine if you can get your hands on one).  The RFB also has an easy to reach (no tools or teardown required) adjustable gas valve -- which has led many an idiot (who didn't bother to tune it) to complain that the RFB won't cycle when, in fact, one can (and must) tune it to cycle for the specific ammo one is running (and/or for suppressor use).  If memory serves, the RFB has 10 tuning positions.  By comparison, IIRC the MDR has a 3-position adjustable gas valve -- and the handguard must be removed to adjust it.  This means you'll be soaking more recoil than you must on the MDR ... since you can't tune it quite as precisely as the RFB.  It also means if you switch up ammo in the MDR from something that cycles reliably to something underpowered that doesn't, you need to break out the tools and remove the handguard to make your adjustment.
     
    So -- the MDR is pricier, less tunable, and less user friendly (when you need to tune it) -- than a RFB.  On the plus side, the trigger on the MDR is likely a bit more crisp than that of the RFB, even through they are within a half pound of one another.  However, it should be noted that the RFB trigger can be brought down to a nice 3-3.5lb trigger with a crisp break ... for about US$100.  Factor that into the pricing and the MDR is still miles (and years) behind the RFB.  I know people will poo-poo Kel-Tec because they are Kel-Tec, but the fact is, Kel-Tec has some very innovative and reliable rifles ... that are sadly marred by 1) prejudices based on Kel-Tec pistols and 2) availability problems caaused by very low production numbers.
     
    All of that said, the MDR in 7.62 NATO looks like quite a gun.  Putting the RFB aside, I'd own a MDR unless I had both staring at me in the gun shop and only one could come home with me (in which case it'd be the RFB).
     
    Surreal
     
    P.S. Anyone else note lack of BUIS on the MDB (in addition to the ridiculous optic he was running)?  I suspect it arises from the same issue as other .308 bullpups -- lack of suitable rail space.  In general, you can't co-witness on most .308 bullpups due to rail space and eye relief being at odds with one another -- but you often CAN (barely) run low profile BUIS.  The top rail length on the MDB suggests that it -might- actually be able to allow for cowitness if a slightly smaller optic is used -- which would be a win over other .308 bullpups.  (K&N Aerospace used to offer a slightly longer top-rail for the RFB, but Ken stopped making them about 18 months ago as I understand it.  With his aftermarket top-rail on a RFB, one could barely fit BUIS on it with an optic ... and couldn't co-witness, at all.)
  6. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Well, the person in the video appears to be less focused on igniting things and more focused on looking impressive while conserving fuel.  A longer burn in one place (using more fuel) is all that's necessary for improved ignition. 3-4 seconds is likely enough...
  7. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    It is highly improbable that the full barrel recoil system was put on the GM6 Lynx platform due to the impracticality of a muzzle brake on a bullpup weapon.  Why?  Because the GM6 Lynx platform in that video had a muzzle brake on it... and I sincerely doubt anyone put that recoil system on the platform due to a muzzle brake being a problem ... and then slapped a muzzle brake on it, anyway.  But hey, it's possible ... just not very probable.
     
    .50BMG small arms absolutely have practical military uses ... but man-shoulderable, man-fireable .50 BMG's with goofy full barrel recoil systems to render them man-shoulderable and man-fireable probably don't.  i.e. The ones the military fields are all intended to be shot from a supported position, not a standing, shouldered/unsupported position.
  8. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Wrong.  I give you the M&P 15-22 Integral ... by Innovative Arms: https://www.innovativearms.com/portfolio/iasw-integral/ 
     
    The loudest sound this rifle makes is the sound of the action cycling (which is what you're hearing in this video).  For comparison, each cycle of the action makes about the same amount of noise a compound bow makes when releasing an arrow -- making it as silent as a bow and/or crossbow ... and probably a LOT quieter than that WWII commando crossbow when you consider the noise and time of re-cocking it (since the full cycle of the M&P 15-22 entails re-charging the weapon).

     
    Yes, it is that quiet ... with standard or even high velocity ammunition, no less -- due to the barrel porting that's covered by the suppressor.  (At the range I've been asked if mine was a pellet gun!)
  9. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Oh I'm sure they'll come up with pintle mounts and pop-up, rotating turret mounts (for use in, say, the roof of an SUV) for it ... as there's really no market for the gun without accessories that make it versatile.
  10. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    It apparently has options for 10" and 16" barrels, should longer barrels be desired.
  11. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    ​Just when I thought pocket guns couldn't get any uglier ... someone creates that thing ^^^^^^^^
  12. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    This is typically caliber-dependent.  A high-power rifle (e.g. .308 aka 7.62 NATO) will produce ~167dB unsuppressed (and even louder with a muzzle brake installed).
  13. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to megaplayboy in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Further up the scale, 180dB will cause permanent hearing loss pretty much immediately.  194dB is the upper bound for noise level in standard atmospheric conditions.  I suspect that's actually "loud enough to kill".  
  14. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Per OSHA, sounds louder than 85 dBA may cause damage if you listen for 8 hours or more. For every 5 dB increase in loudness (i.e. for every doubling in loudness), the amount of time you can be 'safely' exposed unprotected is decreased by half. For example, at 95 dBA, you can safely listen for two hours before damaging your hearing.
     
    With that in mind, you can 'safely' listen to 115dBA continuously for 7.5 minutes; 120 dBA continuously for 3.75 minutes; 125 dBA continuously for 1.875 minutes; 130 dBA continuously for just under 1 minute (0.9375 min, to be precise); 135 dBA continuously for a bit less than half a minute (0.46875 min, to be precise), and 140 dBA continuously for a bit less than a quarter minute (0.234375 min, to be precise) assuming you don't encounter pain at 140 dBA.  
     
    Keep in mind the OSHA 85dBA is relatively conservative ... and that despite this, people with more sensitive hearing will, of course, experience hearing damage at lower thresholds than those with less sensitive hearing.
     
    The split-second impulse of a firearm at 140 dBA just isn't as audible or damaging as you suggest. Assuming there's no accompanying supersonic crack (due to use of subsonic ammunition ... or a ported barrel as on the Innovative Arms M&P 15-22 Integral for which I previously provided a youtube video) ... the impulse sound from the firearm will be easily drowned out in a wooded rural environment by highway or gravel road noise, jet engines roaring overhead at 30,000 ft (audible on the ground), the sound of birds/animals, and other normal daytime sounds/activities coupled with the noise-buffering effects of woodlands -- unless you're talking early morning rural stillness/quiet across open plains before even animals tend to be highly active.  In a bustling city like NYC or LA ... you'd probably not even notice a partial-second 140 dBA impulse during the daytime ... or even several of them. (To be fair, you likely also wouldn't notice several 150 or 155 dBA sounds, either ... due to sirens, car horns, yadda yadda.)
     
    Here are some common noise levels -- the most damaging of which are problematic largely due to their continuous nature ... meaning long exposure times in most cases.  For proper context, a jet engine is listed at 140 dBA ... but its noise lasts a LOT longer than a firearm impulse and thus, it's generally considered unsafe if unprotected ... while a suppressed firearm impulse is only momentary at 140 dBA and is therefore, generally considered safe if unprotected.
     
    Painful
    150 dBP = fireworks at 3 feet (impulse noise)
    140 dBP = suppressed high-caliber firearm (impulse noise)
    140 dBA = jet engine
    130 dBA = jackhammer
    120 dBA = jet plane takeoff, siren
    Extremely Loud
    110 dBA = maximum output of some MP3 players, model airplane, chain saw
    106 dBA = gas lawn mower, snowblower
    100 dBA = hand drill, pneumatic drill
    90 dBA = subway, passing motorcycle
    Very Loud
    80–90 dBA = blow-dryer, kitchen blender, food processor 
    Loud (safe for 24 hours or more)
    70 dB = busy traffic, vacuum cleaner, alarm clock
    Moderate (safe for 24 hours or more)
    60 dBA = typical conversation, dishwasher, clothes dryer
    50 dBA = moderate rainfall
    40 dBA = quiet room
    Faint (safe for 24 hours or more)
    30 dB = whisper, quiet library
  15. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    This was precisely my point.  Also Christopher seems to imply I claimed the gun was silent when what I actually said was:
    "For comparison, each cycle of the action makes about the same amount of noise a compound bow makes when releasing an arrow -- making it as silent as a bow and/or crossbow ... and probably a LOT quieter than that WWII commando crossbow when you consider the noise and time of re-cocking it (since the full cycle of the M&P 15-22 entails re-charging the weapon)."
     
    Apparently he can't be bothered to read ... or he just doesn't remember what he reads.
  16. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to megaplayboy in Cool Guns for your Games   
    I'd argue that if the suppressor reduces noise sufficient to significantly reduce the odds of detection, then the weapon has been made "functionally silent". In game terms, if i kill someone inside a hotel room, and nobody outside the room can hear the shot, then the weapon has been made functionally silent. Outdoors, a 30dB reduction in noise is going to greatly reduce the radius of detection.
  17. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Neither is a bow or a crossbow -- the latter of which is what was put forth by you as a an alternative to guns because guns aren't silent.
     
    i.e. You're being a bit disingenuous (and apparently arguing for the sake of arguing) to call out the technical lack of silence on the gun unless you also do so for the non-silent alternative you proposed.  (i.e. To avoid implying the crossbow was completely silent.)
     
    Note that contextually the gun only needs to be as silent as the alternative you proposed to render the proposed alternative moot.  In today's day and age -- there ARE guns that are quiet enough to do that.  Now comparing WWII guns to the proposed WWII crossbow alternative -- that's a different story. (But you didn't limit it to just WWII guns not being silent -- something which, when pointed out, is a form of me arguing for the sake of arguing, heh!)
  18. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Hey, I think you identified a niche for the pistol that I wasn't aware of.  Thanks for that.  Sadly, though, I see that niche as bass ackwards -- but I'm probably biased.
  19. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Here's another solution in search of a problem in the real world... but something potentially cool for gaming use.
     
     
  20. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Today I bring you the latest F*ck You to the BATFE from FightLite Industries: the FightLite RAIDER. 
     
    Practically useless in every defensive scenario I can think of, this little 7.5" barreled blaster comes in either 5.56 NATO or .300 BLK, with the latter being the obvious choice given the short barrel length.  Screw on a suppressor, slap in a 20 round magazine of .300 BLK, attach a sling to the QD port on the end of the grip (so it can be easily hung/concealed under a duster, trenchcoat, or the like), and your mooks will be the silent but deadly life of your heroic opposition's party.


  21. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to gewing in Cool Guns for your Games   
    In some states like Washington with a concealed weapons permit you can carry a loaded handgun in a vehicle but not a rifle or shotgun. In my opinion that is exactly the role that weapons like this or the Kel-Tec PLR-16 fill.  and I agree that the blackout is the better choice for such weapons
  22. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    LOL. I'm on that page, too!  No practical use but I want it anyway ... for no good reason at all.  If only the bank account were bottomless...
  23. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Zeropoint in Cool Guns for your Games   
    It's dumb but I kind of want one.
  24. Haha
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to Surrealone in Cool Guns for your Games   
    That's nuts...
     
  25. Like
    Prefers2Lurk reacted to IndianaJoe3 in Cool Guns for your Games   
    Autofire skill levels, Visible.
     
     
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