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DoctorImpossible

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Everything posted by DoctorImpossible

  1. Immunity to (Insert Genre You Don't Like) Not sure it would be accepted in a tabletop game. Or rather, instead of actually building it into the sheet, I suspect most people are going to prefer it if you just ask ahead of a campaign that it not feature X, Y, or Z. If it was built in Hero, it would be basically a very powerful version of Transform as an area around you, big enough to cover any part of the setting you can be percieving. But, funnily enough, it does exist in DC. There is, or *was* at least, a paranormal investigator who looked into all sorts of the supernatural goings on, amd always was able to debunk them and shame the con artists behind it. In his original stories that was because his universe was a normal one. But, as the DC universe became more connected, and he was gradually sharing a world with *actual* Greek Gods and ghosts and ghouls, it was retconned into him being a metahuman who was reality warping, so the things he investigated really were real all along... until he was in range of them, at which point they turned into normal human con artistry, with all the signs of having existed as that the whole time, only to flip back to being supernatural once he'd left. Personally, I'd like to try using it to make sure the campaign world was always some light-hearted family friendly adventure, not a grim, dark iron age game, or anything.
  2. I think Transform is already effectively a Cumulative power by default. The text of it describes using it again and again to make the change happen more.
  3. Alright... How about "The ThinkBank", a team of at least 5 wealthy genius types who, bored with their endless charity fundraisers and thinking that they could do a better job of saving the world if only they were running everything, devote their genius, and cash, toward attempting the thrilling business of total global domination together?
  4. The villain, provided that they have already proven somewhat capable as villains in the past, could simply offer that they will turn a new leaf and be super-heroes rather than super-villains in the future, if this scheme goes well. Or even just that they'll retire.
  5. Hungry Hungry has legally changed her name to the single word, in a genuine tribute to the single word adjective monikers of Disney's seven dwarves. From her father, a wealthy crimelord, she has inherited a great deal of wealth, and also dwarfism. From her mother, she inherited a genius level of intelligence, a talent for engineering, and an unceasing hedonistic gluttony. She has given up on walking anymore, as she prefers being "carried around like a Queen from times of yore", aboard a seat within the two metre tall war-robot that she pilots.
  6. Potion of Slippery Ness - Grants you a few of the more desirable qualities of famous adventurer, Slippery Ness. Makes you a bit tougher, gives you some regeneration, add a bit of a strong will, and other such things.
  7. Honestly, I'm starting to wonder about some people becoming super, not because of their own efforts, strictly speaking, but because they're the sort of people that an enterprising super-scientist/magic-user is likely to decide might make for a good hero and therefore they end up gifted with some advancedbtechnology or mystical artefacts or super-soldier serum or some arcane empowerment. Like, we'd end up with Dwayne Johnson and Keanu Reeves showing up to join the world-saving superhero team, festooned with magical artefacts and wearing power armour, but even if you took all the gadgets and magic items away, they still turn out to be full of healing factors and superstrength and casting spells. All on the basis that the two of them have a reputation as really nice people, who are very physically capable.
  8. Sounds like a fun addition to a game. Plenty of people use nazi soldiers and mafia henchmen as classic pulp bad guys, so a little variety ripped right out of the headlines from that era sounds great! Well, since you're asking here, you're clearly playing a pulp action-adventure game, so I'd lean towards them being somewhat skilled but also having fairly potent weapons and a pretty good car (speedy, yet manoeuverable, but also reasonably tough) and then also add a heaping helping of plain old luck on top (good luck for them, and maybe bad luck for anybody trying to stop them). Basically I would try to make them seem like significant threats to normal civilians and even less combat-focussed heroes, but not enough to stand up to an enemy military (Nazi invaders, or an alien war robot or the like) by themselves.
  9. Booked to see it this week coming. The latest of The Rock's amazing career of Jungle Pulp Adventure Films. Starting to feel like The Rock has the same taste in films as I do.
  10. Personally, I would say natural/training is the same as any other forms, *except* it comes mostly from your own skills and not any kind built-in superpowers, or strange effect that changed you, or even being a normal person except for having a gadget or artefact or gift of power from a wizard. Shazam/Captain Marvel? Magic. Got given alternate form of immense power and the associated skill with magic as a result. Thor? Magic. Got born with superpowers compared to humans because of being magical in nature. Also, gifted with Mjolnir. But Doctor Strange? Natural/Training. He wasn't born a god, he wasn't gifted with a bunch of superpowers by an immortal and nobody left him a magical artefact. His dedication to study, meditation, practice, and eventually to defending the world, led Doctor Strange to become skilled with the spells and rites and invocations that grant him his incredible "powers". Cyborg? Technology. His body is rebuilt as something new, using a fusion of human and the advanced technology that now is his body. Green Lantern? Technology. He was gifted with the Green Lantern ring, an extremely advanced piece of alien technology under his command. Iron Man? Natural/Training. Tony Stark has honed his genius intellect and advanced purely human technology to a level that is comparable to many alien empires. The X-Men? Mutants. They have been born with an advanced, superhuman physiology that blesses them all with superpowers. The Inhumans? Mutants. They suffered an exposure to terrigen mists that mutated in their DNA to give them superpowers. Hourman? Natural/Training. He uses his incredible intellect and thorough education in chemistry, and biochemistry, to produce Miraclo, the one hour superpower pills that grant him superpowers for one hour at a time, letting him perform great heroics. And so on. Basically, whatever your superpower is, you can potentially get there with your own skills and talents, and therefore be a Natural/Training based superhero... Or, you can get lucky, and stumble on them, in which case you have to use a different type of origin story to explain. Basically, I think that the important part is the fact that these heroes are who they are without their powers. If Billy Batson couldn't change forms, he is just a human child. Thor used to turn into Donald Blake regularly, and always needed to change back into Thor before he was a significant threat to his enemies. Meanwhile, Doctor Strange had a long story arc recently that centred entirely on him *losing* his magic, but still finding ways to be just as effective without them, because he knows his enemies strengths and weaknesses. If Green Lantern loses his ring, he is just a man. Potentially, depending on the Green Lantern, a military officer, but still just a man. Take away the suit from War Machine, and he, too, is just a military officer. But take the suit away from Tony Stark, and what is he? A billionaire, genius, playboy, philanthropist. Heck, if he can find a cave and a box of scraps, then a few days later, he'd have another Iron Man suit. Inject a mutant with "the cure" and what do you get? Functionally humans, although technically just still mutants with a dormant X-gene that can still be triggered again. Cure inhumans? They become humans. Dose Hourman with some new "antidote" to miraclo? He'll just take another dose and get another hour of superpower.
  11. Yeah, Tenet seems to have been almost intentionally full of loud background noise over a lot of inaudible dialogue, so that the audience would ignore the vague, poorly explained scifi elements, in favour of just enjoying how the big, dumb, explosive action was made to work backwards and forwards. It was a sort of showcase for a few action set pieces with a cool gimmick, rather than any of Nolan's usual, plot-driven, playing with a timeline films, like the reverse story order (Memento) or the different rates that time flows in different dream levels (Inception).
  12. I would see this less as a dictate on what you do and don't do, but more as a simple fact about you. This is the ideal Distinctive Features description for any setting with a "Hell" that some beings are native to. This is basically just a sign that while you may never do anything immoral (and therefore evil), you still set off any demon detectors around you, glow red instead of blue when angel/demon vision is used on you, and so on and so on, because you are Evil (but in the setting specific, allied with hell variety) even if you save the world every day and heal sick puppies every night. Mortals who care about morality and kind deeds will want to know more about you, but Angels who will serve certain gods, clerics and paladins who have bought into those Gods and all of their "divine word", and even some of the mortals who simply don't know better than to judge you based on shiny magic spells that say "this is a thing of pure evil, kill it now", will all murder your current form on sight, but other demons and hell-oath mortal mages will not necessarily ally with you, because they know that simply being aligned with "Evil" together does not mean that you two have the same goals or moral codes. Hence why it is a disadvantage.
  13. Yeah, the Tick is actually a great example. Code of the Hero would mean that, like the Tick, you assume that authority figures are likely to be good guys, but you don't then have to automatically obey every authority you meet, especially not if you think you're doing something more important than the law currently requires of you (you wouldn't allow yourself to be arrested, if that meant that the villain is able to carry out an evil scheme right now, on the other side of the city, for example).
  14. I'm not sure if it is strictly *pulp*, but I did recently start the Skullduggery Pleasant books. Quite good modern fantasy crime in the noir detective style.
  15. I don't think the specific era is important to whether it is or is not pulp. It being pulp is more about the action adventure, the fact that the heroes never even question their own decision to do the right thing, even when it gets them into danger, the wide exploration of the setting, and so on.
  16. I've done the inverse sometimes, when I was in a D&D campaign as a D&D character (a Human Fighter, specifically) and played them as a superhero (took the folk hero background, played the leader of a rebel village of nomadic refugees, fought with no weapons, using a luchadore style masked vigilante hero identity).
  17. You say fireball is not necessary, and I know that D&D has some very specific ideas about what a fireball spell is, but honestly, I tend to encounter a more apt form of what I would call a "fireball" spell generally featured in a *lot* of fantasy. That being the depiction of a mage who holds out a clenched fist or spreads out their fingers and suddenly those fists are wreathed in flame or their spread fingers are cupping a hovering ball of fire, then they either punch the air towards their target or vaguely flick their open hand towards their target, and the ball of fire is sent flying into the opponent. Rather than exploding and taking out a room grenade flamethrower style, these common fireballs tend to simply "punch" the target, along with a little bit of damage from the fire itself, but only enough fire to cause a problem for extremely flammable targets. Otherwise, the main point of the spells is just to produce a very hard punch at a long range. That seems like a fairly believable spell for all sorts of magic-users to learn and teach their apprentices as the most basic form of attack, even if only for self-defence. You're an academic who doesn't want to get into melee with your enemies, so you learn how casting an element at your enemies works, and of course everybody picks the element that is the most easy to learn how to cast. Basically just a Blast with Energy Damage and No Endurance Cost.
  18. Bruce Lee, of course, the master of the martial arts, as our heavy hitter. White Death (Simo Häyhä) brings his own super identity, is our weapons master. Harry Houdini, the master debunker, is our expert investigator and escapologist.
  19. This might sound strange, but what is actually in that folder? Because I am honestly loving the look of that character build lay-out. Is there a PDF copy of those write-ups that you could share with the forum? (Obviously not if that is an official product or what-have-you, but since that looks like a Batman image in there, I was inclined to think that it was a fan-made thing.)
  20. It is not so much a single quote as a rough paraphrasing of a running joke that is not at all in character (at least, I don't think so) in canon, but we do jokingly say it in the voice of our characters, whenever a supervillain gets pushed off a high place and can't fly, or gets blasted unconscious with a beam: Oh, no! NOT WILHELM!
  21. Honestly, since that's Alyson Tabbitha, it wouldn't surprise me if she was just actually Mystique IRL. I mean, have you seen her Jack Sparrow? Or her Lestat? Or... Well, you get the idea. Shapeshifting powers IRL don't seem unlikely.
  22. Maybe that's the secret. The successful super-villains who you hear from, because they keep cropping up to do villainry, are the crazy obsessed types. There are plenty of the previously lower level but then got a power up or some training or just a sack full of treasure, who you simply stop hearing of and you tend to assume that they finally died off after Punisher found them, or got sent to the Suicide Squad, or whatever. You know, basically the word on the street is that they finally got big enough to draw too much attention for their power level/smarts and got killed. But what actually happened was that they got all they ever wanted. Somebody with the small pocket dimension powers that let them smuggle weapons and cash and stuff as a mercenary, retires once they figure out how to make a whole extra pocket universe, because instead of smuggling *an army*, they'd rather make a lot less money much more safely by simply letting supervillains retire to a pocket world mansion. Some sort of immortal who only became a supervillain from boredom finally reaches the end of the century that they promised themselves they'd spend as a supervillain, and disappears, with nobody realising their connection to the new superhero who rises on the other side of the world, being a hero for the next hundred years. The evil wizard that everyone was so worried about finally kills their good guy archnemesis... and promptly resurrects them, joins the their team and is revealed to have been that hero's mentor all along, not having turned evil but merely trying to test the hero's worth and having found it wanting, but with potential. Basically, in a comic, heroes and villains tend to keep coming back the same as they ever have been, with any changes (even good, well-written, famously popular changes) being retconned or simply ignored by some later writers who either didn't do their research or just refuse to acknowledge the changes. But in the real world, with those heroes and villains added, there's much more scope for long-term redemptions, or a retirement for a super-villain, or just an illegal deal actually going well.
  23. How did I miss that one? Literally the scene that it shows up in, he says that! Gah!
  24. I'm tempted to say that Robert Downey Jr and Chris Evans would end up being similar to their fictional counterparts. Not because of their portrayals but because of the stuff they've done outside of that. In RDJ's case, visiting lots of amputees with new, advanced prosthetics. In some kind of Super-hero universe, I could see his influence in that field being able to get all sorts of hyper-advanced prosthetics, to a "winter soldier" level, ending up making lots of people into cyborg super-heroes. In Chris Evans case, his crusading against the resurgence of actual Nazis, which, in a super-hero universe, means that he's going to end up as a super-hero, fighting the forces of, for example, the Red Skull.
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