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archer

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archer last won the day on April 15 2019

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  1. I'd recommend starting with Missile Deflection. Lord knows, the Earth didn't purchase enough....
  2. Never lay off responsibility onto the player for whatever real psychological problems the character had when her character sheet was made.
  3. Don't you mean "how bipolar Captain Janeway is"?
  4. My daughter is playing a pre-teen female character set in the My Hero Academia universe. The PC's are evil and are attacking the hero world. My daughter's character is psychotic and a killer. In her backstory, it is strongly implied that she killed her own parents. I don't know if the campaign will ever go there but I encouraged my daughter to have the character's psychotic break coming from having accidentally killed her parents as her quirk first emerged. That would work with the lethal nature of her powers and help explain why she shifts back and forth so easily between innocent child and casual killer. ==== In Medieval settings, people tended to grow up quickly. Kids were married or at least having to take on adult responsibilities by the time they were 13-14 years old. I'd worry a lot less about young characters living in that era than in the modern world. The other characters (not necessarily the players) would likely expect the kid to either keep up and pull his own weight or get killed or quit. At least unless the kid was really exceptional and worth protecting for years until he became and adult by the standards of the era. And that might well be the case if magic is rare in your world. If the kid's parents were poor, they'd likely be thrilled to have him apprenticed to a band of adventurers, just as they'd be thrilled to have him apprenticed to a blacksmith. It's one less mouth to feed for them and good training so the kid can make a living for himself in the future. If they're lucky, the kid might even make enough money to take care of his parents if they grow old or infirm. If the kid isn't the oldest boy in a family of nobility, they'd likely be happy to have him apprenticed to adventurers as well. Otherwise, the family would be expected to buy him armor and a horse at some point do he could go out on his own to do much the same adventuring and soldiering. If the family are guildsmen of some sort, they'd probably the kid rather work in the family business or be apprenticed to another guild rather than be an adventurer. But there wouldn't be much of a way for them to stop him if he really wants to run away and join a heavily-armed band of adventurers.
  5. I picked prehistoric. We may not have them all listed in the historical record, but there's always been some number of extra-ordinary people on the planet: Gilgamesh, Hercules, Qin Shi Huang, Kahn, Robin Hood, John Hawkwood, etc. Some have been overtly heroes. Some have deliberately been villainous or used their power to gain control of countries and armies. Others have tried to either live a normal life or tried to use their powers quietly for the benefit of themselves and their close friends. A phydaux pointed out, the first actual costumed adventurers who are widely recorded and remembered were those like the Scarlet Pimpernel and Zorro. The first sizable number of masked mystery men in the US emerged in the 1920's and 1930's seemingly in response to the rise of organized crime and the exploits of heavily armed and violent criminals such as Bonnie and Clyde. There's certainly been a seemingly ever-increasing number of people with genuine superpowers in recent decades making themselves known to the public. Experts differ on whether that is due only to the rapidly increasing world population plus an increasing acceptance from society of people openly using superpowers or whether the rate of incidence of people obtaining superpowers is rapidly increasing as well.
  6. I'd like to make it clear that I was joking by comparing the Mogo character to a real planet that'd take a Death Star to destroy. When superhero characters are fighting Mogo the Green Lantern or Ego the Living Planet, the BODY which the characters have to overcome has to be low enough that the players aren't spending the rest of their lives in a gaming session trying to do 12d6 to it at a time. So for Mogo the character which the superhero PC's are fighting, an 84 BODY score is fine. But if you have Mogo the planet in a Star HERO campaign, you're going to have to use something closer to pbemguy's estimated 2,057,830,312,500,000,000,000 BODY to make sure the players don't crash two or three starships into each planet they see in order to completely obliterate it. So I guess a lot of the answer to the question posed in the original post is just exactly how JmOz is planning on using the planet in his campaign. If it is "Earth as a target to be completely obliterated", that's going to be different than "Earth as a WarWorld" which has engines on it so it can fly through the cosmos menacing fleets or other planets. And those will both likely be different than "Earth as a superhero character".
  7. I would much prefer that superpowers have existed, at the very least, for decades. You're losing a ton of creative space if you don't allow for the potential to introduce older generations of heroes and villain organizations, legacy heroes, gods, ancient magical artifacts, etc. If you want to recent new surge in heroes which is unusual, you can always have a White Event (ala the Marvel Comics New Universe), the emergence of mutants, aliens found Earth and spread technology & experiments, or whatever other things which might be appealing.
  8. Makes me think about this exchange
  9. In your Green Lantern thread, Greywind had Mogo's BODY as 84 but I think that's a touch on the low side. Wikipedia puts the Earth's volume at 1.08321×10 to the 12th power. That's in cubic kilometers. HERO rulebooks will tell you the BODY of a hex of stone. I'd recommend doing the math then taking out about 5% because Earth isn't all solid stone.
  10. Can always have the main villain and some of the hostages in a remote location. Or a remote control bomb around one of the hostages to promote compliance. Or just a bomb set to go off in a building somewhere else. Have henchmen in the room, rafters, and watching video cameras on-site. Whack-a-mole was my first thought when reading the title. But I've always had trouble designing death-traps. Either the trap is fool-proof and will work if I use it or I don't see the point. I can't seem to get myself into the mindset of "well, I'll put the hero in a death-trap so I can watch him escape". To me, that doesn't make sense for even a deranged person.
  11. If looking good ever becomes a crime, I'm ready to do life.
  12. That's certainly how I look at the Terran Empire era. If I'm playing in the Terran Empire era, whether in a campaign set there or time traveling into it, I'm in the Terran Empire era. But if I'm in the year 2020, the Terran Empire is but one of many possible futures, even if someone time travels from the Terran Empire and shows me a history book. Look at Marvel's first big attempt at a unified timeline: 1) present day 2) Bionic Wars - Deathlok - sort of apocalypse near future 2) War of the Worlds - the second "Martian" invasion finished off the Deathlok era. Killraven was eventually instrumental in driving the invaders out. 3) Mankind recovered and discovered interstellar travel. Attracted the attention of the Badoon who enslaved Earth and its handful of colonies. The original version of the Guardians of the Galaxy formed as renegade freedom fighters. I mean, it was a neat idea and they wrote some good stories time traveling forward & backward and tried to make a comic book out of the Guardians. But as soon as someone at Marvel wanted to write a story which seriously conflicted with that timeline, they found a way of making that happen. So as far as I'm concerned, the second that Dr. Genetika manages to devolve humankind into hyperactive lemurs, the Terran Empire quits being one of the possible futures of humanity.
  13. That's what I think. I used to work for a major US airline. I had a badge that would let me into HQ, into employee-only areas of multiple airports without needing a justification, let me fly for free on my airline, and let me completely bypass security when I traveled. I could fly on other carriers, even abroad, for pocket change (like US to Britain, UK, mainland Europe, Greece, Egypt, Israel for $25-$50). I could chat to the CFO and CEO in the halls. I had access to starling amounts of sensitive information. And I was about as close to a complete nobody as you could be. The badge and travel were benefits any employee had. The reason most people didn't chat with the bigwigs in the halls were that they didn't have the guts to strike up a conversation. I had access to information because having access to that information was a vital part of my job. I couldn't ask anyone for assistance with anything outside the scope of my job with any expectations that I'd get it. My bosses depended on me but I couldn't convince even them to do their owns jobs, much less do anything out of the ordinary.
  14. You might try introducing the players to Deimos through a street tough who speaks with an accent. Think of a NYC native cabbie accent, something roughly like: "Yeah, dere's dis new guy name of 'Lord Die Most' who is movin' in on da city. Supposed ta be a real up an' comer. I could intraduce ya for just a bit of coin. I hear he's lookin' for some ah, 'versatile', talent rather than just muscle like me. Seems like you guys would be perfect." The people from his organization, most of them coming from the streets, call him "Lord Die Most'. And indeed, he does from time to time kill underlings who've disappointed him. Then you could eventually let him reveal that his name is actually "Deimos" and he just got tired of trying to correct peasants who couldn't learn to pronounce his name. By that time. the players might be more used to his presence and not immediately make the connection between his name and the fact that he's likely a demon. Of course if you're one of those many GM's who hate trying to do accents, nevermind.
  15. archer

    Nemesis

    I've heard of the Elementals but am not familiar with their roster of characters. But since you're looking for feedback, I do think it's neat that her AK 8- , Radar, and Choke Hold are all so cool.
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