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st barbara

What "Pulp" have you read lately ?

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Thanks to my grandfather I read a lot of Doc Savage books. I read some modern pulp novels for a while, the "executioner" series by Don Pendleton. God I'm so embarassed to admit that...

 

 

Embarrased?  By God man!  They're PULP!   :winkgrin:

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Thanks to my grandfather I read a lot of Doc Savage books. I read some modern pulp novels for a while, the "executioner" series by Don Pendleton. God I'm so embarassed to admit that...

The Executioner books that were actually written by Don Pendleton are great. It's when he left the series and they started using ghost writers that the quality suffered. Another great modern pulp series that suffered the same fate is The Destroyer. When Richard Sapir and Warren Murphy started the series, it was all about philosophy, political commentary, social satire, and of course plenty of violence. The later books usually try to emulate the formula but the writers usually only succeed with the violence part. Still, each series has a few good books by ghost writers and more than a few great books by the original writers. If you can get your hands on early Executioner and Destroyer, you won't be disappointed.

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Did you know Pendleton wrote a straight up SF novel, "the guns of Terra 10"?

No, I didn't know about that. I know about the Ashton Ford series because I have four of them. Besides those and a ton of Executioner books, I don't have anything else that he wrote. I'll have to see if I can track it down. Thanks for the heads up.

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The just finished list for October:

Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood. The first book in the Phryne Fisher series of modern mysteries set in 1920's Australia. Not technically 'pulp,' but set in the period. I'd previously seen many of the television series episodes with my wife and decided to try the books. An interesting read, with a heroine hat certainly has the skills to have been a pulp adventurer.

G-8 and is Battle Aces #1: The Bat Staffel & #2: Purple Aces by Robert Hogan - Wow. Ummm. Just wow. If Bob Hogan wasn't smoking something when he started writing these, he must have started before too long to keep the ideas flowing. Planes shaped like giant vampire bats, tunnels capable of allowing 100,000 German troops to appear in the middle of France from, brainwashed/hypnotized pilots, cloaked madmen, evil science dwarves (yes, that is a real thing), and more. Well worth reading, even if you're not a fan of WW1 aerial combat.

Writings in Bronze, by Will Murray - A collection of the pulp historian and writer's essays and articles on Doc Savage. Fascinating reading, with some really interesting looks at the real 'history' of Doc Savage. Lots of cool ideas in here for you to lit and adapt.

The Revised Complete Chronology of Bronze by Rick Lai - An updated and revised chronology, putting all of Doc Savage's adventures in chronological order by date, with a collection of bonus essays at the end discussing his parentage, familial relations, and how other famous (and infamous) pulp figures tie into his story. A real campaign booster, and highly recommended.

The Chronology of Shadows by Rick Lai - Does for The Shadow, what Rick did for Doc Savage in his 'Chronology of Bronze.' Equally recommended.

Diamondstone, the Magician Detective by G.T. Fleming-Roberts - A magician-turned-detective after someone revealed the secrets of his illusions, Diamondstone is a big, blond man with a love for magic tricks, a good right, and an eye for the ladies. Interesting and worth a read.

The Horror on the Links by Seabury Quinn - The first of a multi-part chronological collection of the Jules de Grandin stories. Occult-themed short detective stories, these are the first of the series and, one assumes, a bit more rough around the edges than the later stories) as the somewhat (to modern eyes) effeminate de Grandin and his American physician companion confront werewolves, ghostly cultists, vampires, and more. I really can't recommend these enough if you're looking for nontraditional occult stories to draw scenario inspiration from.

Rick Lai's Secret Histories: Criminal Masterminds & Rick Lai's Secret Histories: Daring Adventurers - A pair of companion volumes publishing Rick Lai's essays on assorted pulp era heroes and villains, dealing with familial relations (for example, how is Jack London's Wolf Larson related to Sax Rohmer's Fu Manchu), battles between them (both villains and heroes) and more. Fascinating Wold Newton Universe stuff.

 

 

 

 

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Just now, st barbara said:

 "Kharis 2000" You might see if you can find the DVDs of "Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries":, an Australian T V series based (originally) on the Kerry Greenwood novels.

Excellent suggestion.

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Just got my copies of Jess Nevins' "The Encyclopedia Of  Fantastic Pulp Heroes" and "The Encyclopedia Of Pulp Adventurers". Lots of characters that I don't know (of course) and at least ONE surprise omission, Eric John Stark, unless I missed him, but otherwise it looks like good fun and very worthwhile, as can be expected of Nevins. I haven't read right through them yet, but they will definately fill a gap in my reference library.

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On 7/23/2017 at 8:59 AM, Tech priest support said:

Thanks to my grandfather I read a lot of Doc Savage books. I read some modern pulp novels for a while, the "executioner" series by Don Pendleton. God I'm so embarassed to admit that...

 

Don't be embarrassed.

 

I have been reading the Executioner off and on now for some 30 years. Every couple of years, I get the itch and have to go back and read a batch of them for fun. All total, I think I have 200+ Executioners and all of the Able Team and Phoenix Force lines. Now that I finished watching the Punisher series on Netflix, I think Mack Bolan might be calling me back yet again...

 

Now, Doc Savage - I actually haven't read any of them - can someone give me an idea of what this line of books is like? Where would a newbie start?

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1 hour ago, toddbanister said:

 

Now, Doc Savage - I actually haven't read any of them - can someone give me an idea of what this line of books is like? Where would a newbie start?

 

Book 1 is Man of Bronze.  The original 181 stories were from 1933 to 1949.  There are additional new/rewrite/etc from 1975 through the present. 

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"toddbanister" Try looking on the net for "Nostalgia Ventures Inc" or "Sanctum Productions". They have reprinted a number of the "Doc Savage" stories in a large size magazine format complete with illustrations and essays by people such as Will Murray (One of the authors of the post 1975 stories mentioned by "Spence").

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On 11/24/2017 at 11:51 AM, Nothere said:

These two books sound like they have a lot of repeat entries.

Nevins says in his introduction "Fantastic Pulp Heroes" is intended to cover all the heroes who appeared in science fiction,fantasy and horror stories. "Pulp Adventurers" is intended to cover all the heroes who aren't the protagonists of science fiction,fantasy and  horror stories ".  I haven't yet found any repeat entries.  Another volume (which I don't have) covers pulp cowboys and there may be others planned.

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