Jump to content

Opal

HERO Member
  • Posts

    496
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Lawnmower Boy in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Which just makes it that much better a metaphor for racism, since the very concept of race also falls apart on close inspection.
  2. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Echo3Niner in Create a Hero Theme Team!   
    Gynoid
     
    Paige Lari, reclusive co-founder of tech titan, Moogle, best know for its descending order of morality search result algorithm, retired in 2019 to become a superhero named after her company's popular operating system.
    As Gynoid, Paige sports a custume, battlesuit, or perhaps holographic forcefield projection, of a glowing blue, idealized, statuesque female form topped with her undisguised notoriously nerdy face including her trademark rectangular reading glasses. 
    In combat or emergency situations, she produces powerful blasts, fields, and persistent energy constructs that behave much like solid objects.
    While her head is always visible it's actually protected by a virtually invisible fishbowl helmet or force globe.
    Whatever sufficiently-advanced technology she uses seems to blur the line between energy and matter.
  3. Like
    Opal reacted to Christopher R Taylor in House rule for Dispels and Suppress   
    OK some analysis:
     
    The thing is, bare Dispel works well: on average you're going to get exactly the active cost or better on average that you paid for the dispel.
     
    ACTIVE                AVG
    COST      DICE    ROLL
       10         3d6       10
       20         7d6       24
       30        10d6      35
       40        13d6      45
       50        17d6      59
       60        20d6     70
     
    Its when you start adding modifiers to it that things get odd.  
     
    +¼ Advantage
    ACTIVE                AVG
    COST      DICE    ROLL
       10         2½d6    9
       20         5d6      17
       30         8d6      28
       40        10d6     35
       50        13d6     45    
       60        16d6     56
     
    +½ Advantage
    ACTIVE                AVG
    COST      DICE    ROLL
       10         2d6        7
       20       4½d6     16
       30       6½d6     23
       40       8½d6     30
       50        11d6      38
       60        13d6      45
     
    Now, this happens with damage too; a 60 active point blast with penetration is 8d6 (28 average stun) or with armor piercing is 9½d6 (33 stun) with damage instead of 12d6 (42 average stun).  That's usually not a problem because the advantages increase effect on the target, such as halving defenses. 
     
    But dispel is all or nothing; it works or it does not, and modifiers don't increase that effect.  You can buy armor piercing, for example, but it doesn't do anything unless the target has power defense.  So advantages just strip down power and you get less and less effect.  In a fantasy campaign, for example, you're going to tend to have fairly broad advantages on dispel, such as "affects all magic" which will strip down the effect of dispel significantly and making it fairly weak.
     
    So if that effect was true of damage, it would be as if none of the advantages actually increased impact and instead was stuff like Variable Special Effect, Reduced END Cost, and Increased Range.  You'd just do less damage to your targets and it wouldn't feel like it was ever worth advantages.
     
    The problem here is that Dispel acts like an attack, but isn't really.  It acts like a defense too, but its aggressive; it targets and takes effect as Shrike noted.  So its a hybrid that is neither fish nor fowl and the rules don't work precisely on Dispel.
     
    The trick is to find a way to combat that effect, without making it too effective.
  4. Like
    Opal reacted to Quackhell in Supers Image game   
    Beatdown
     
    Charli Madison had been a fighter all her life. Trained by her ex-boxer father Chuck "Mad Dog" Madison at the age of 10 she excelled at the sweet science. She dominated as an amateur and was well on her way in the pros when a serious eye injury forced her into early retirement from the ring. During her fighting days she had been exposed to Detroit's criminal world and would eventually become an enforcer and debt collector for The Commission. The Commission was a new organization set to try and take over in Detroit and replace the gangs and the last vestiges of the Mob. To this end they wanted to boost Charli to the next level. She acquired super strength and reflexes through drug enhancements provided by the criminal chemist The Fix. The Commission also had some armor boots and gauntlets made to provide protection and more offensive capability. Lastly her hi-tech shades protect her injured eye and compensate for her blindspot. Her work with the Commission as Beatdown has brought her into conflict with hero team the Motor City 6 and the reformed alien invader turned bouncer named Brawl.
  5. Like
    Opal reacted to Quackhell in Supers Image game   
    Thought I would throw an image out there to try and rekindle this thread. Maybe we loosen things up a bit and just forgo the picking winners deal and just let people post ideas and their own images if they wish. 

  6. Like
    Opal reacted to Christopher R Taylor in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    I think the problem with the portrayal in Marvel isn't the existence of anti-mutant bigotry, but its almost universal status.  It would have worked a lot better if most people shrugged at it, but a mean, nasty group hated mutants for being mutants.  That would not only fit bigotry better (no group has ever been universally bigoted or been discriminated against) and would carry more impact.
  7. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Dr.Device in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    So, yes, OT1H, all the reasoning around mutant hysteria does fall down upon examination, but then as a metaphor for racism, that works, because the rationalizations an constructs of racism, and race itself, also don't hold up to dispassionate scrutiny.
     
    OTOH, the consistent presentation of a group as dangerous is just part of prejudice against that group.  Maybe Marvel should have introduced a lot more non-/trivially- powered but obvious mutants as 'extras' in background scenes and as victims of mutant hysteria, to make that point more clearly?
     
    Personally, that still feels on-point for me as a metaphor of the crazy ways race can work.  In past times and places, there were racists who were absolutely certain they could tell a Jew or an Irishman or whatever at a glance, while today, we don't see it, like, at all.  
     
    Certainly, tho, a story or two of a mutant spreading around a mutate or mystic origin story as a way of "Passing" might've been a nice idea.
     
    OK, well, I can agree to disagree on that point.  I quite like allegory as a literary technique.  It allows the reader to look at the logical structure and moral/ethical implications of a real-world phenomenon without all the unexamined emotional attachment they may have to it.  Sure, some of us can be super-dispassionate without any such crutch, but even if all of us could, it can still be an aesthetically pleasing literary device.
  8. Like
    Opal reacted to Greywind in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Fear rarely makes logical sense.
  9. Like
    Opal reacted to DShomshak in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    <curious> Such as? I've been out of comics for a while, but as of the time I stopped reading Marvel (1990s) I don't recall there being any mutants who simply looked different. OTOH there were lots of mutants with dangerous powers who looked like ordinary humans. Most of them, in fact.
     
    Okay, I can see the parallel quasi-reasoning:
     
    "Some gangbangers are Black. Theefor, I believe that all Black people are gangbangers. I shall ignore all the Black people who aren't gangbangers, and all the gangbangers who aren't Black."
     
    goes to:
     
    "Some mutants are dangerous supervillains. Therefor, I believe all mutants are dangerous supervillains. I shall ignore all the mutants who aren't dangerous supervillains, and all the dangerous supervillains who aren't mutants."
     
    I still think it falls down because, based on the characters presented, most mutants have powers that would make them extremely dangerous if they chose to be: more so than even the most suicidally determined, non-super human being.
     
    It might have emotionally rang true to me if Marvel had shown more instances of super-powered people being falsely accused of being mutants. (I remember one instance, but that's it.) So perhaps it isn't the bigotry that rings false to me, as the apparent magical power that people have to tell that a mutant character is a mutant and not some other sort of superhuman.
     
    (In my own campaign settings, there are a few "mutant suremacists" because there's no idea so crazy that someone won't believe it, but most people regard mutants with envious admiration for their luck in being born with super-powers. People hope they are mutants too, who just haven't discovered their powers yet. OTOH, in my worlds there are no handy-dandy "mutant detectors" -- the only way to tell is a detailed genetic analysis -- so "muytant" often means merely, "I don't know why I have powers.")
     
    Dean Shomshak
  10. Haha
    Opal reacted to Nekkidcarpenter in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Based on my experiences around dessert, I doubt my willpower would be enough to make a Green Lantern Ring light up more than the one my kids got from the gum machine.
     
  11. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Dr.Device in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Its not irrational to fear gangbangers or rapists, either.  It is irrational to fear all black men because there are black gangs, or all men because virtually all rapists are men.
     
    Bigots always point to a reason to fear the object of their bigotry - it's not always a made up reason, it's the generalization that's, if not entirely irrational, simply wrong.
     
    Yeah, Magneto is a living engine of mass destruction, but other mutants just look different.  
     
     
  12. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Dr.Device in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    That's an apt metaphor for racist Replacement Theory.
     
  13. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Lawnmower Boy in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Its not irrational to fear gangbangers or rapists, either.  It is irrational to fear all black men because there are black gangs, or all men because virtually all rapists are men.
     
    Bigots always point to a reason to fear the object of their bigotry - it's not always a made up reason, it's the generalization that's, if not entirely irrational, simply wrong.
     
    Yeah, Magneto is a living engine of mass destruction, but other mutants just look different.  
     
     
  14. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Lawnmower Boy in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    That's an apt metaphor for racist Replacement Theory.
     
  15. Like
    Opal got a reaction from drunkonduty in Mutants: Why does this idea work?   
    Which just makes it that much better a metaphor for racism, since the very concept of race also falls apart on close inspection.
  16. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Drhoz in Quote of the Week from my gaming group...   
    Closer to the traditional meaning, nice.
     
    And, thanks for doubling my knowledge of Pathfinder. I didn't even realize they weren't playing 3.5 D&D.
  17. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Drhoz in Quote of the Week from my gaming group...   
    I was mainly thinking of the guy - there's hot fantasy art of guys out there (and there's always romance novel covers), but his concept was being old and dissipated.
    And, yes, those two are less on the nose than an exotic worshipper of a lust goddess - but they're still a tattooed (former) slavegirl and a shapeshifter.  Civilla also gets points for protagonist potential and hints of an internal life, tho.
     
     
  18. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Weldun in Quote of the Week from my gaming group...   
    Closer to the traditional meaning, nice.
     
    And, thanks for doubling my knowledge of Pathfinder. I didn't even realize they weren't playing 3.5 D&D.
  19. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Weldun in Quote of the Week from my gaming group...   
    I was mainly thinking of the guy - there's hot fantasy art of guys out there (and there's always romance novel covers), but his concept was being old and dissipated.
    And, yes, those two are less on the nose than an exotic worshipper of a lust goddess - but they're still a tattooed (former) slavegirl and a shapeshifter.  Civilla also gets points for protagonist potential and hints of an internal life, tho.
     
     
  20. Haha
    Opal reacted to DShomshak in Online Media in a Superhuman World   
    Back in my old "Seattle Sentinels" campaign world, one PC greatly disliked the fan site devoted to the nude video posted by a really annoying prankster villain: alt.bluejay.nudevideo.pant.pant.pant. Yes, this was waaay back in the days of Usenet.
     
    But of course there was plenty of other super-porn, mostly clumsy cut-and-paste jobs splicing the heads of heroes and villains onto existing porn. And if anyone with actual super-powers was in the biz... Nah, let's not go there, it's a family-friendly forum.
     
    The supervillain Blitz had an annoying online presence, too, but for different reasons. Though he was the mutant progeny of twisted Nazi eugenics, and raised to serve the setting's HYDRA/VIPER homage, his martial arts sifus inadvertantly gave him many admirable qualities. Plus, male-model gorgeous (see: twisted Nazi eugenics). There were fan sites devoted to him -- to which he sometimes posted fitness and self-defense videos and urged young people to stay off drugs. All very annoying to heroes, especially to those who care that Blitz had a bigger fan club than they did. Kind of annoying to the evil world-spanning criminal conspiracy as well, caught in the paradox that they are bad guys but everyone likes good publicity.
     
    Dean Shomshak
  21. Like
    Opal reacted to Terminax in A World Apart [A TMX Campaign]   
    Everyone - I'm cool. We're cool. I might have been annoyed, but I am not remotely angry with anyone. I apologize if I've ruffled any feathers with my statements.
     
    I've made it a policy that I tell people up front what they can expect from me at my table (whether virtual or not) and one of the things is I don't want to play with certain types of people. I don't wish them any ill, but the vast majority of the Right-Wing and so-called Libertarians, apocalyptic Evangelicals and anti-LGBTQ+ types hold views very contrary to mine and work against my well-being and that of many others. I don't really want to discuss it at length in public, hence why I asked what I did.
     
    Tjack - Thank you for the welcome. I am however not particularly new. I've been a member since 2009. I've just not communicated much over the years. Past social anxiety issues mostly.
     
    Opal - I'll refrain from further RL political comment in public. I will send you a PM instead to address your points.
     
    The third party in-game politics however are fair game. I happen to remember Ross Perot Jr sort-of Presidential run in 1992 and it definitely had an impact, even if he fizzled out. Third party candidates were getting elected elsewhere, like Jesse Ventura in Minnesota. So in a world of superheroes, and different outcomes, I could very well see a third party IF it was run well and consistently having an opportunity in 1992 when both the Republicans and Democratic candidates were weak and suffering from missteps As parties go, the Patriot party is a center-right with a very "Greatest Generation" vibe to it especially at first. Russel G. Warding was young (early 40s), charismatic, very successful both in business and family without any whiff of scandal. He had connections that served him well and unlike Perot, spent time building his political movement and message well advance of the election and stood firm on his messaging throughout the election. He appealed to allot of the voter base and was shockingly elected. He only lasted a term however because the Patriot party held neither the House or Senate and had to fight every inch to get anything done, so he was voted out then the next four years sucked and he got elected again, this time with a much bigger margin in the House, and about the same as before in the senate and he got allot more done. Sadly his successors weren't as talented, and the party steadily lost ground afterwards but I haven't gotten to the more modern political climate.
     
    There is quite allot I haven't gotten to yet and the Rhodesia/South Africa history blurbs and specifics are part of those. There's an couple of alien invasion/incursions that hit in the 70s, and Rhodesia/South Africa lucked out and retrieved alien salvage from one which gives them a technological edge against their neighbors. Rhodesia in particular also have a significant RAVEN presence.  I've told others elsewhere on the forum I am a fan of old school VIPER and RAVEN. The dynamics of 4E's war between them that led to RAVEN falling to VIPER then being milked for cash, then freeing and reinventing itself was one of the best long term plot threads that spanned the original setting. My twist is that yes RAVEN loses the war, is taken over by VIPER and milked for cash then frees a *portion* of itself. The freed RAVEN in the 90s becomes the reinvented Raven as what occured in the 4Es An Eye For An Eye book. However, there's a portion that sticks together under VIPER, who ultimately "sheds" it as franchise to one of it's most reliable Nest Leaders and it becomes RAVEN 3.0, which serves closer to the original RAVEN in design rather than the criminal conspiracy that Raven develops into. Three orgs, two with the same name and all very confusing to outsiders if they don't pay attention/know the backstory. South Africa is an entirely different matter and is basically old Apartheid Africa given a new lease on life thanks to alien technology.  They're heavily dependent on robotic drones which allow them to cope with numbers it's opposition possess. Africa of this world is much more in strife torn than our world.
     
    As to North Korea, it's easier to answer this backwards. I'm a huge fan of the Uber comic and really have wanted to do something with it in game form and this someplace I think I can use the ideas behind Uber without it being an alt-WW2 universe. North Korea is basically a nazi state in all but name and conveniently they had this one time when they could have been pushed off the map had the Chinese not stepped in to save them. So instead of the Chinese stepping in, what if the North Koreans had an army of super men that they finally commit to action? That's my hook. As to what the whole process is, that's one of the secret plots I'm not going to reveal outside of it getting revealed in-game. Every North Korean has blood taken and tested, to determine their viability as a candidate. They get a mark on their personal papers and when they serve their obligatory service, candidates get pulled based on said mark and the national need for particular subtype of super man, go to the deep underground (yet unpenetrated by outsiders) bunker complex in the North of the country and... go through the process and return to duty as part of the North Korea Special Forces branch. Back during the war, the process was a bit cruder and they made only the basic light brick initially but against normal soldiers, that's still more than enough. Over the years since, they've refined and broadened their capabilities and it wasn't until after the armistice that the developed their equivalent to the "battleships" of Uber. As for China, they basically have the same view of North Korea after they got the bomb... contain contain contain.
     
    As to why other countries haven't figured out North Korea's secret sauce? Or duplicated on their own? They just plain don't have the secret ingredient(s) or the secret recipe/formulation to make it and the North Koreans who know either are number less than twenty and perhaps as many as three know both and none of them have been above ground since they were read in. Attempts have been made to procure it and failed. As to good old Doctor Destroyer, he's dismissive of whatever they're doing because he knows his technology is better. He's certainly grabbed a few "samples" over the years and tried to figure it out and... it's secret has always eluded him. That should tell you something. Malachite... err, I mean Teleios has the same thought process.
     
    Most of the world's super soldier programs follow the traditional paths - genetic manipulation, biological and chemical augmentation or cybernetics. Cybernetics are by far the most reliable method but not cost effective. Genetic manipulation is a crap shoot - mutates are tend to be as random as mutants are (and yes, I follow the Marvel conventions of Mutates vs Mutants) but hybrids... well there's been some success there just hasn't worked out to the point where nations would trust the results or tolerate the bad publicity. VIPER on the other hand... Biological and chemical augmentation can be fairly reliable and comparatively cheap but they usually go only so far and have side effects. Other technologies have just worked out better. Power suits and Mecha for instance. Not any cheaper, but normal people can use them and that ultimately makes them more comfortable to most governments.
     
     Long winded but I hope that answers your questions.
  22. Like
    Opal got a reaction from Steve in A World Apart [A TMX Campaign]   
    It doesn't take particularly strong Libertarian views to want to point out that the Right Wing is not Libertarian, at all - like, ew - 
     
    But you did kinda throw down the gauntlet there, I mean, I assume unintentionally:  The board's policy - and less casual denizens can correct me if I'm wrong - is not go into RL politics much in the gaming forums, and that gives you the option to say "hey, enough with the politicks" when someone does go off on a political tangent you don't care for - but to preemptively say you don't want to hear about politics /from one side/ is kinda introducing politics into the discussion, in itself.  
     
    (And, it's straight-up politics, call it history because it was 30 years ago, but a Third Party President?  That's possibly the least plausible thing in the whole batch - magic is real, ley lines unstoppered by Tut's tomb, gods & monsters, alien invaders ..OK, sure, it's genre... but a 3rd Party winning the Presidency?) 
    Blogs are a good option, too, you can keep all your writing together, and you can moderate comments, yourself.
     
    So, I've noticed several bits of alternate history so far, and I am curious how that happened.  IRL, Rhodesia was immediately beset from all sides - UN sanctions, the Russians, and the Chinese, /and/ their neighbors in Africa all backing their foes and basically no one backing them.  Did Doc D or Viper intervene as part of a long game plan for world domination that simply called for more unstable minority-rule states muddying international waters?  Did specific home-grown supers intervene?  
    South Africa is easier to see - if the mass program of divestment hadn't held together, for instance - though it also makes me think they probably stayed Nuclear.
     
    Also North Korea is an interesting choice for super-powered army.  What resources did they get that somehow the world's superpowers couldn't uncover or duplicate with decades of trying?  A mystery that might offer possible plot threads and origin stories.   It'd also completely change the PRC/DPRK dynamic, and give 'juche' some real teeth.
  23. Like
    Opal reacted to Vondy in My Newhon Campaign   
    I unexpectedly received a box from my mother containing the notes and character sheets from my long-running "old school" D&D campaign. This game ran for years, from childhood to young adulthood. I haven't seen this stuff in 20+ years. After the nostalgia wore off I though "I really need to translate this into hero (something I considered doing "way back when") and reboot it yet again.
     
    Post One. Real World History.
     
    My early D&D campaigns were shared with an eponymous co-GM so that we could both play. We originally used Lankhmar as its base city. We didn’t know much about Newhon. Our only reference was the Newhon Mythos section of Deities & Demigods (1980) and a beat-up copy of Swords and Deviltry. We decided that the Northmen, in addition to Kos, worshipped the Finnish Pantheon, while Bacob and Hecate became Lankmari demigods. That covered religion.
     
    We ran a lot of modules. Newhon’s Great Salt Marsh and Sinking Lands were perfect stand-in locations for a lot of the 1st edition modules from “The Known World” and the Hool River / Marshes region of Grayhawk. These modules often featured reptilian or amphibian monsters. We saw far more Bullywugs, Lizard Men, Sauhagin, Troglodytes, and the Yaun-Ti than we did the standard “evil” humanoids.  They also seemed to fit better with Newhon’s weird pulpy groove.
     
    It didn’t occur to us not to include demi-humans, but with the exception one long-running dwarf and elf, the vast majority of player characters were humans with a smattering of half-elves thrown in. There were an awful lot of fighters, thieves, and fighter-thieves. No one liked playing clerics and, with the exception of a long-running illusionist, we had few mages, and none of those advanced past the mid-level range. Our heroes were very much “freebooting mercenary adventurers” and “loveable rogues.”
     
    Most NPC mages were Fire Mages, Snow Witches, Necromancers, or Scribes and Alchemists (Dragon Magazine). So, magically speaking, the traditional D&D wizard acting as “mystic artillery” was not a prominent fixture in our games. We weren’t too far off the S&S mark. Our characters relied far more heavily on potions, scrolls, dusts, powders, and disposable items (e.g., wands). Permanent magic items were rare and often were often cool “utility” items rather than weapons and armor. That was the zeitgeist for magic.  
     
    When Lanhkmar: City of Adventure (1985) was published we snapped it up. It was much clearer about how Newhon should differ from generic D&D. I had also read Swords Against Death at this point. Over time we derated demi-humans as new PCs and either removed those races or sidelined them to the hinterlands along with the more common “evil huanoids.”. One long-running and nigh-iconic half-elf PC became “some demigod’s bastard.” We also implemented the supplements interesting, if not-quite satisfactory, system for “white” and “black” magic.  
     
    We then decided to play-through a series of desert-themed modules and homebrew adventures (including a pastiche of Tower of the Elephant). These were set on the far bank of the Eastern Sea. I hadn’t done much reading that would cover that part of Newhon, but I had read Thieves’ World and had Chaosium’s Thieves’ World boxed-set (1981), so we used Sanctuary as our base city with a handwave towards it being on the frontier of the now-decaying Rankan Empire. Hyperborea’s Shadizar and Sukhmet also made appearances. One notable interpolation was that the Scarlet Brotherhood made an appearance as the shadowy hand of fallen Quarmall.  The campaign closed with the heroes returning to Lankhmar.
     
    The rebooted Lankhmar campaign focused more on character-driven stories and personal drama, which often vibed like a “D&D Telenovela,” but around this time the shift to 2nd edition was taking place and a lot more Lanhkmar materials were being published for D&D. I had also read a lot more thieves world, farfd and gray mouser, and conan stories at this stage. I ran the homebrew stuff (the 1985 book has pages of maps with places to record homebrew notes for locations) while one of my players ran the modules so that I could trot my own characters out every so often.
     
    The rebooted game was much truer to the swords and sorcery milieu in general, and Newhon in particular, but we also managed to work in some eldritch and gothic horror elements, which jived really well with Newhon’s “weird.” Beholders, mind-flayers, reanimated flesh golems, necromancers, and the occasional vampire were a thing in this game. Anyhow. That’s the history of my long-term campaign and how it developed (without going into the character's crazy backstories).
     
    Next up: What old-school modules were played alongside the homebrew adventures?
  24. Like
    Opal reacted to Terminax in A World Apart [A TMX Campaign]   
    Technology, Magic and Mutants in A World Apart
     
    ---
     
    Technology in this world is often well advance of our own, but in general application of said technologies still happened across a same time frame as world. For instance, while cellphones and similar small sized communications equipment were deployed much earlier than the real world, their overall usage didn't really take off any faster than in the world of A World Apart. Super science and technology has been rampant since just before WW2. Early superhumans were almost all the result of genetic alteration (even if they didn't understand genetics until later) via biological and chemical augmentation. Early computers and even cybernetics/robotics existed in very experimental forms from the start but they didn't really get used/applied until later. Things like power armor and robots saw service in WW2 but they were crude compared to what developed in the so-called Silver Age. The internet bloomed in the same time frame as the real world but things like broadband and fiber optics supplanted dial-up  in much quicker timeframe and so on.
     
    Mecha and super robots exist, with mecha largely supplanting super robots in modern times - the difference in the two is mostly a matter of appearance and size. Mecha tend to be smaller, look like real robots/vehicles and far more numerous than you'd expect. Super robots tend to be giants, and outlandish looking and most have been long retired by the modern era. Yes there were giant monsters and yes they fought. Just in general, they did so outside the public eye or were actively covered by outside forces. Japan was super crazy in the 60s and 70s for them and had no less than 7 super robots (many of which were combiners!) but over the years they've all been destroyed, dismantled or mothballed and in modern times, Mecha have taken their place. The USA, Russia and China maintain the largest numbers with most other inclined nations have a one to three dozen such machines.
     
    Similarly from the 1970s onwards, there was a tremendous increase in power armored and cybernetic using superbeings. In modern times, particular since the 2000s the military, police and other security agencies all have access to such technology though the ultratech versions used by the likes Paradigm and Doctor Destroyer are far beyond anything in common use. Life extension technology is extremely common with the wealthy or powerful easily able to double their natural life expectancy.

    How the North Korean superhuman program works is completely unknown, even to Doctor Destroyer though he's of the opinion it's based on alien technology. UNTIL thinks it's some form of magic. There seems to a different series of techniques involved, because they have developed quite a few variations over the years. The most typical power set is a low-powered brick with low-powered speedsters and telekinetics being the next two most common power sets. However, there are a number of much more powerful versions of the above that combine all the previously mentioned characteristics and even some unique abilities. What IS known, that the process is ultimately fatal to the user - dramatically shortening their lives. Typically the subject is endowed at 18-20 years of age (and possibly earlier) and the average lifespan is reduce to 30 to 35 years of age and often less, depending on how much they use their powers. Lives are very expendable in the DPRK and women are expected to have as many children as possible as result.
     
    ---
     
    Magic on the other hand is wildly disputed topic in IC terms. There's as many truths and fictions as there individuals, creatures, and entities and it becomes muddled fast to normals. All that people can really agree on is magic exists, that supposed patheons of Gods amd Demi-Gods exist and the rare Dragon makes an appearance. For the people who are actually involved in the magical world, they know magic has existed for much longer than current record of history and that is has largely waxed and waned over the years and since the 1920s it has been absolutely exploding beyond any level ever experienced by humanity. For as many people who claim they have the answers, just as many people try to disprove them.
     
    Magic, like superpowers is only wielded by a small fraction of the population and in many forms. There are a handful of "Arch Mages" or high-powered magical beings seen in public but for the most part, they keep quiet on the vagaries of magic. They're usually just viewed as superhumans with a difference. Governments tend to really dislike magic as they cannot control, quantify or regulate it effectively.
     
    The speculation concerning the seven (or are there more?) great wards - all of which predate the structures placed over top of them - focuses on the idea that there was some precursor of modern man, who lived in an age unknown to those that came after it and of no record of it remains. Certainly geographic and archeological evidence does not support this but magic is... weird. What IS known, is that three of the wards have completely failed each leading to a small catastrophe in the modern world. Four more are believed to exist and are all compromised and will fail eventually. But nobody knows where or how or what will happen when they do. As to what the wards were intended for, it's believed that they channel Earth's magical energies into a containment spell which quelled magic for thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of years. Both the Circle of the Scarlet Moon and DEMON have their own theories, ranging from entombing some great precursor mage to sealing away primordial beings but is it the truth? Nobody knows.
     
    Magical creatures from Trolls to Goblins to Fae and the frequently mentioned Dragons exist, but are very rarely seen by the general public and often will be just be confused with superhumans in general. After all is there any difference between an Orc and a person who LOOKS like an Orc thanks to a mutation? Magic is... weird. 
     
    ---
     
    Mutants are believed to be the result of the radical increase in radioactivity resulting from nuclear weapon usage for the past 70+ years. Like normal humans who have undergone experimental superhuman augmentation, they've been affected somehow at the deepest genetic levels which manifest in all sorts of superhuman abilities and powers. However, in direct contrast to the results of experimentation, technology or even magic or the divine - mutants face allot of public mistrust and blowback for mostly hypocritical and religious reasons. The negative view of mutants is not nearly held as strongly as classic racism, sexism or classism divides but certainly is a rising problem.
     
    According to Rhodesia and South Africa (which both remain as isolated White dominated Apartheid states in A World Apart) there are no mutants nor magic using people in either country. The truth is, as soon as anyone, emphatically non-white shows a speck of superhuman ability, regardless of it's origins they are tracked down and murdered. Whites with superhuman abilities, even mutants are required to serve the state in perpetuity, and maintain the cover than their abilities are the result of enhancement technology. Those that don't get with the program are likewise eliminated unless they manage to flee outside of Africa.
     
    ---
     
     
    Not at the moment but perhaps sometime in the future. I'm putting out the campaign notes in full first.
  25. Thanks
    Opal got a reaction from Duke Bushido in A World Apart [A TMX Campaign]   
    It doesn't take particularly strong Libertarian views to want to point out that the Right Wing is not Libertarian, at all - like, ew - 
     
    But you did kinda throw down the gauntlet there, I mean, I assume unintentionally:  The board's policy - and less casual denizens can correct me if I'm wrong - is not go into RL politics much in the gaming forums, and that gives you the option to say "hey, enough with the politicks" when someone does go off on a political tangent you don't care for - but to preemptively say you don't want to hear about politics /from one side/ is kinda introducing politics into the discussion, in itself.  
     
    (And, it's straight-up politics, call it history because it was 30 years ago, but a Third Party President?  That's possibly the least plausible thing in the whole batch - magic is real, ley lines unstoppered by Tut's tomb, gods & monsters, alien invaders ..OK, sure, it's genre... but a 3rd Party winning the Presidency?) 
    Blogs are a good option, too, you can keep all your writing together, and you can moderate comments, yourself.
     
    So, I've noticed several bits of alternate history so far, and I am curious how that happened.  IRL, Rhodesia was immediately beset from all sides - UN sanctions, the Russians, and the Chinese, /and/ their neighbors in Africa all backing their foes and basically no one backing them.  Did Doc D or Viper intervene as part of a long game plan for world domination that simply called for more unstable minority-rule states muddying international waters?  Did specific home-grown supers intervene?  
    South Africa is easier to see - if the mass program of divestment hadn't held together, for instance - though it also makes me think they probably stayed Nuclear.
     
    Also North Korea is an interesting choice for super-powered army.  What resources did they get that somehow the world's superpowers couldn't uncover or duplicate with decades of trying?  A mystery that might offer possible plot threads and origin stories.   It'd also completely change the PRC/DPRK dynamic, and give 'juche' some real teeth.
×
×
  • Create New...