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Duke Bushido

Widening Gyre

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I have no idea where to put this, and "other genres" seems appropriate.

 

No; I'm not looking to tear it apart or ask questions about it.  I just wanted to say that I spent this afternoon reading it.  Yeah; I'm probably the last guy to buy it (that's just the way it tends to go for me  :lol:  ), but I read it today-- the PDF, anyway.  I intend to read it again when the printed book shows up.

 

First: it took me far to long to make the connection between the Bill Keyes listed on the cover and our own Bill Keyes.   That was humorously embarrassing.  :lol:

 

Second:  I thoroughly enjoyed it.  It was well-written, with an easy, comfortable writing style that read quickly and lightly.  I want more!  :)    I have to say that overall, it's not my thing-- well, Steampunk is something I've enjoyed for quite some time, but the over-all tone built into the offered setting is a bit 'dark' for my tastes, or rather, to be more accurate-- a bit dark for what I like in Steampunk.  I suppose I'm a Verne at heart. ;)

 

Still, I can't say enough good things about this book, over all.  Even though it tends to be a bit dark by default, it's not overtly depressing or dehumanizing, and is filled, particularly near the end, where the suggestions start coming hard and fast-- with suggestions on lightening things up.  I wasn't too keen on the baked-in presence of magic, but again-- lots of suggestions on ignoring that, and they worked well.  Oddly, I didn't mind magic as it relates to the talents of Savants.  It seemed almost appropriate there.

 

One thing I would liked to have seen was a bit more information on the "ancient evil beasties."  No; I don't need write-ups for a piece of background, particularly one that is expressly described as not taking direct action in the setting, ever.  But I would like to know just _why_ they are interested in humans and technology-- at least, more than the vague mentions that they are in fact interested-- and why this interest waxes and wanes across generations.  To a lesser extent, I would like to know the effects on humans of this waxing and waning.  I suppose to sum it up: is this something unique to the setting?  Is it important to the history or the future adventures of the game?  Or was this an afterthought to bring this wordbook in line with the much-unloved universal timeline dropped on us in 5e and not yet abandoned?

 

Still, that's rather minor, as if I chose to run with this book, I could always invent what I needed and ignore what I didn't.  And I confess that it _is_ helpful that the provided introductory adventure leaps directly to the machinations of these great evil beings and their attempt to use Savants to open a dimensional gateway.  But that also seems pretty close to direct intervention.  Still, it does provide an idea of the motives the evil and how they influence the world.  I'd just like something a bit more concrete.

 

 

However, if you haven't checked it out, I can't recommend it enough, if only for pleasure reading.  It's just really well-done, and should be considered a high-water mark for third-party products.  

 

(What I really wish, though, was that the HERO version got the same cover as the Savage Worlds version.  :(   )

 

 

 

 

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I've started running a "Victoriana" campaign, and Widening Gyre is of of my minor sources.  It's a good book.

I'd love to see a Victorian Hero or Steampunk Hero the size of Pulp Hero, but that won't happen.  In my campaign I'm combining pieces from Cowboy Hero, Horror Hero, Widening Gyre, GURPS Steampunk, Victoriana, Castle Falkenstein, and several others just to get the pieces of all the things happening in a magictech world of 1866. Lots of stuff!  And since mine is based in the San Francisco, not London, there are different assumptions about the goings on.

But I digress. Bill Keyes did a great job with his Widening Gyre. 

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On 8/17/2019 at 11:36 PM, Duke Bushido said:

First: it took me far to long to make the connection between the Bill Keyes listed on the cover and our own Bill Keyes.   That was humorously embarrassing.  :lol:

 

I never developed the habit of paying attention to author names when I was younger. At the time, the internet didn't exist and I didn't exactly live in a hotbed of authors so I never really expected to ever see or speak to an author.

 

With no ingrained habits of paying particular attention to authors' names...well, these days now that I have documentation from doctors and the government that my short term memory isn't reliable enough to use for official/legal purposes, it's a shock to me on the rare occasions that I do make such connections.

 

I've had a number of conversations with an author about what he wrote without realizing that I'd been talking to the author. So I'm sure it's happened on any number of occasions when I never realized at all that I was speaking to the author. :)

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