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zslane

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zslane last won the day on February 18 2020

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  1. Fair enough. Unfortunately, that slots so effortlessly into Snyder's aesthetic that it becomes difficult to discern who's creative vision I'm experiencing. I never read Teen Titans, so to me it just feels like Snyder's deconstructionist agenda is dragging most of the characters down, including Cyborg. The main thing that saved Cyborg for me was Ray Fisher's palpable charisma.
  2. Aquaman had entertaining moments, but was mostly a mess from a filmmaking perspective. I'm not inclined to give it a pass, as other are so willing to, just because it was colorful and kept my retinas stimulated. As for characterization, well I just could never get on board with Snyder's vision for Aquaman, Superman, or the Flash. The only DCEU characters who favorably impressed me were Wonder Woman and Cyborg, though I would have liked to see a Cyborg that wasn't just a walking dark cloud of brooding angst most of the time.
  3. Yes, it was. However, most folks I've heard discussing the movie since its release acknowledge that its massive success was entirely due to being the prelude to Avengers: Endgame rather than being a particularly great movie or because it carried the banner for female representation in the MCU. In my estimation, had it not been the lead-in film to Endgame, it would most likely have squeaked past the $600M mark and not much further.
  4. Yep. Technology moves faster than society. After a new media format becomes profitable, it always takes a few contract renegotiation cycles before the unions (SAG, WGA, DGA) manage to get their fair share. Usually they have to threaten to strike to get any kind of concessions from the studios, which shows the necessity of the unions (though there's also a downside to unions for their rank and file members).
  5. Hard to imagine that since she was working with Disney on a Tower of Terror movie. It's possible that project was dead and that fact had yet to ooze out into the trade press. But if not, then she sacrificed it on the altar over a fight she won't win.
  6. With any luck, Namor will be portrayed so well in the MCU that everyone will just forget about Momoa's Aquaman. I find the entire DC cinematic line-up completely underwhelming except for Wonder Woman, and even there Jenkins managed to foul that up in her sequel.
  7. Scarlett was tapped to be part of the Tower of Terror movie with Disney, but that won't happen now. The worst thing you can do (for your career) in Hollywood is become litigious. This will end her relationship with Disney full stop. And other studios will be very cautious to work with her, afraid that they might get sued if she doesn't like something. She should have saved this fight for the next SAG contract negotiation, and used her clout to assist the entire union, rather than making herself persona non grata in Hollywood.
  8. Or Dr. Who. Yes, thanks to the revolving door of actors who have played Bond (or Dr. Who), you have a highly fractured fanbase. This is the same problem DC has with their characters. They go through Batmen the way the Broccolis go through Bonds, and it creates a complete mess within the fandom. No one version ever acquires enough traction to become truly iconic, except maybe the very first one (e.g., Sean Connery). Marvel largely avoids this problem by only very rarely switching out actors. Moreover, they don't reboot their franchises every few years, they expand upon them instead. Star Wars had become as fractured as DC, but now there is a glimmer of hope now that Favreau and Filoni are taking on a larger role in that franchise. I'd like to believe that Disney has learned their lesson with Star Wars, and that they have formulated a plan to avoid the kind of sh*tshow that live-action DC has been.
  9. Unlike comic book characters who can remain the same age for decades, actors get older, they want to move on to other things, or they social-media their way out of a job. Clearing the decks of one set of characters to make room for the next generation of characters is an unfortunate necessity of live action cinema. Until we perfect digital actors who look 100% real, with no uncanny valley effect, and can be performance-captured and voiced by numerous actors over time, we won't have superhero characters that continue on for two, three, or more decades. The Iron Mans will have to give way to the Ironhearts, and one Captain America (or Black Panther) will be replaced by another, and then another, etc. All we can hope for is that Kevin Feige does a good job of this. I, for one, have no problem with Kate Bishop taking over for Hawkeye, to take just one example. As long as they do a good job with these new characters, I'm still all in on the MCU.
  10. As Greywind's link explains, Brie Larson never said anything about not wanting a "particular demographic" to go see Captain Marvel, or anything to that effect. But this is the Internet where misinformation becomes mythologized and believed without much question.
  11. I stopped the video about 1/3rd of the way because it was evident to me that he was mostly just harping on DC, and I don't need to be reminded of just how misguided and inept WB/DC is. But the future of the genre isn't dependent on them; they've managed to make themselves almost completely irrelevant, in my view. I'd say that as long as Feige is in charge of Marvel Studios, the future of the genre on film is still pretty bright. And the fact that he has successfully supplemented big-screen MCU with connected small-screen content shows that there is still an awful lot of life still left in the genre.
  12. I don't tire of superhero movies. I just tire of action movies that pretend to be superhero movies. Naturally, that statement is entirely based on my personal definition of "superhero", which not everybody shares. So the movies that disappoint me don't necessarily disappoint others, and the trends that make me weary don't necessarily make others weary, etc. I think that as long as Marvel keeps mixing things up--at least a little--in their MCU movies, there should be something for everyone, even me. As for DC, well, I lost faith in them a long time ago, and not even the first Wonder Woman movie was able to change that. They are a lost cause as far as I'm concerned, and I won't be looking to them to supply me with any superhero entertainment worth my time.
  13. So at what point did everyone realize it was Luke Skywalker coming to the rescue in the finale? When Ahsoka said that a Jedi might come searching for Grogu (and that not many were left), three episodes earlier? The moment an X-Wing fighter landed on the light cruiser? The moment a black-cloaked figure appeared on the video monitors? The moment the figure swung a lightsaber? The moment the lightsaber was shown in color (being green)? Only after Luke pulled back his hood? (I don't know how to make this into a poll).
  14. I would have loved to see a prisoner break-out sequence. It would have been far more entertaining, and it would have made a lot more sense. But it would also have taken a lot of time out of the episode (to do properly), and they had a very important date with an Imperial terminal to focus on instead.
  15. Hollywood is becoming dependent on Chinese box office the way western society is dependent on Middle Eastern oil. It is difficult to be the master of your own destiny when you are beholden to someone else's resources.
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