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#2641 Old Man

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 02:13 PM

Boeing selected to develop High Energy Laser pod for tactical aircraft


...and that's when the destruction began.

#2642 Christopher

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 02:39 PM

C&C Generals - Zero Hour Confirmed!



#2643 tkdguy

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 02:16 AM

Purple rocks on Mars


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#2644 Nolgroth

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 04:59 AM

 

Well, looks like Prince is settling in nicely. :D



#2645 DShomshak

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 06:15 PM

Discover magazine's latest issue features its end-of-year roundup of the top science stories of 2016. No surprise, #1 is the detection of gravity waves from colliding black holes. This isn't just another successful prediction from General Relativity -- it's a whole new form of astronomy, since the LIGO detectors are precise enough that scientists can calculate the direction and distance of the event, the masses and spins of the black holes, and other details. The article says that since that first detection, other black hole collisions have been observed, too.

 

#2 was the Proxima planet.

 

A bit further down the list was something not observed. The Large Hadron Collider has not detected evidence of a new class of particles predicted by a theory called "supersymmetry." This theory is an important part of the "Standard Model" for unifying the weak and strong nuclear forces with electromagnetism. The greatest triumph of the Standard Model was perhaps the successful prediction of the Higgs particle.

 

Among other things, the hypothetical supersymmetric particles, or "sparticles," are necessary for explaining the mass of the Higgs particle. (Without them, its mass should be quadrillions of times greater.) Sparticles, predicted to interact only weakly with normal matter, are also one of the leading contenders for dark matter. So, failure to detect them is a problem for physicists and cosmologists.

 

(This comes on top of other experiments meant to detect weakly-interacting dark matter particles, which have also failed.)

 

Theoreticians can tweak and complicate supersymmetry to raise the mass of sparticles, explaining why the LHC hasn't found them yet. But it's one more cosmological puzzle to add to the pile.

 

Dean Shomshak



#2646 Lawnmower Boy

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 06:31 PM

Well, duh. Dark matter doesn't exist. I mean, how could it? haven't seen any. 


Feh. Logic is overrated gibberish.


#2647 Christopher

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 11:00 PM

Among other things, the hypothetical supersymmetric particles, or "sparticles," are necessary for explaining the mass of the Higgs particle. (Without them, its mass should be quadrillions of times greater.) Sparticles, predicted to interact only weakly with normal matter, are also one of the leading contenders for dark matter. So, failure to detect them is a problem for physicists and cosmologists.

direction and distance of the event, the masses and spins of the black holes, and other details. The article says that since that first detection, other black hole collisions have been observed, too.

"Gravitons? WE. ARE. SPARTILCES!"

I guess with that name, a "this is sparta" joke was asked for.


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#2648 Zeropoint

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 12:55 AM

It's pronounced sparti-kleez.

 

You know, because Greek.


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#2649 Christopher

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 01:37 AM

It's pronounced sparti-kleez.

 

You know, because Greek.

And now I am thinking of the "I am Spartacus" scene.

 

Would explain why it is so hard to find - others keep claiming to be it.



#2650 DShomshak

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 05:56 PM

The Dec. 2016 issue of Scientific American features an article about more new discoveries about the formation of the Solar System. As the author notes, 20 years ago we had a clear and simple model of planet formation: In the course of a few hundred million years, a spinning disk of dust and gas condenses into dust bunnies, then pebbles, boulders, planetesimals and planetary embryos, that finally consolidate into planets. Thanks to studies of exoplanetary systems, accretion disks around other stars and new techniques for very precise measuring of isotopes and magnetic fields in meteorites, that stately picture is now dead.

 

The author recounts new evidence that a lot of early planetesimals generated enough internal heat for their insides to melt, segregate and even generated their own magnetic fields. (Radioactive aluminum-26 is proposed as the chief heat source.) Along the way, it looks like the entire process of planet formation took less than 10 million years. In fact, planetesimals with liquid iron cores might have formed in only 500,000 years.

 

The article concludes with a proposed mission to asteroid Psyche, a big nickel-iron asteroid that may be the stripped-off core of one such planetesimal.

 

Dean Shomshak



#2651 Christopher

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 06:53 PM

The Dec. 2016 issue of Scientific American features an article about more new discoveries about the formation of the Solar System. As the author notes, 20 years ago we had a clear and simple model of planet formation: In the course of a few hundred million years, a spinning disk of dust and gas condenses into dust bunnies, then pebbles, boulders, planetesimals and planetary embryos, that finally consolidate into planets. Thanks to studies of exoplanetary systems, accretion disks around other stars and new techniques for very precise measuring of isotopes and magnetic fields in meteorites, that stately picture is now dead.

 

The author recounts new evidence that a lot of early planetesimals generated enough internal heat for their insides to melt, segregate and even generated their own magnetic fields. (Radioactive aluminum-26 is proposed as the chief heat source.) Along the way, it looks like the entire process of planet formation took less than 10 million years. In fact, planetesimals with liquid iron cores might have formed in only 500,000 years.

 

The article concludes with a proposed mission to asteroid Psyche, a big nickel-iron asteroid that may be the stripped-off core of one such planetesimal.

 

Dean Shomshak

Okay, AL-26 sounds interesting. It has a half life of about 70.000 years and only cosmic radiation hitting magnesium is likely to produce more. Wich means you can use it to "Carbon Date" asteroids

The relatively short halflife combined with Magnetic Fields preventing it's existence, means that AL-26 might delay the formation of planets quite a bit (if it is indeed the souce of the heating). But as a result it will not actually hinder it forever (as the magnetic fields+decay will result in stopping to exist).



#2652 tkdguy

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 02:00 AM

A new theory on how the moon formed


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#2653 tkdguy

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Posted Yesterday, 01:15 AM

ALMA captures images of Sun

 

Cassini photographs Mimas

 

Dark energy, but no dark matter?


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